Beef Stock

I made a big batch of grass fed beef stock. I was planning on drinking a cup or so a day for all of the various benefits (collagen etc.) After cooling, there is a large amount of hard fat on the top. I'm used to removing it and throwing it out like I used to do before BP (and like I still do when making homemade chicken soup,) but I'm now thinking I shold probably be eating it. Should I save it in pieces and as I heat up each cup to eat add a chunk back in? Or shold I use it for cooking? It's basically been slow cooked for about 12 hours.
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Comments

  • Yeah everything i've read says that fat is oxidized and should be thrown out.  I give it to my dog.


  • RodRod The Rodfather
    edited February 2013

    Yeah everything i've read says that fat is oxidized and should be thrown out.  I give it to my dog.


     


     


    lol Fail!  ;)


    Everything I learned about "biohacking" has been baby steps to "circadian biology", that's where the real biohacking comes in. You can buy a bunch of cool shit to "hack" but if you don't have context, you're not winning. Paleo is just a brand now and too many have opinions, it's on you to read and reread the material to not only find truth but to connect the dots. Much love to everyone who has helped me on my journey for restoring my health, please keep in touch. Feel free to message me with health questions [email protected] 

  • Ha ha yeah don't worry I only give her a little...   I like to put a layer of bones in my crockpot and put a roast on top so I'm making a broth while cooking the meat.  Then when the meats done I'll add more water and let it go overnight.  It makes super gelatinous concentrated broth.  


  • We're supposed to skim all the fat off? EVen if it's been simmered at low heat the whole time? Just checking, I've heard both sides of this and am unsure.


  • We're supposed to skim all the fat off? EVen if it's been simmered at low heat the whole time? Just checking, I've heard both sides of this and am unsure.


    I assume the fat would be less oxidized if you use a lower heat.  But I get a lot more gelatin and all the good stuff out of the bones when I put my crockpot on the "high" setting.  

  • I assume the fat would be less oxidized if you use a lower heat.  But I get a lot more gelatin and all the good stuff out of the bones when I put my crockpot on the "high" setting.  


     


     


    For beef stock, I cook it low and slow.  I use the stove top and have it barely simmering which I think equates to about 325 degrees in an oven.  And I cook it for a minumum of 12 hours.  It basically makes a nice bowl of beef jello when it cools.  If my wife runs out of the room so she doesn't throw up I know that I've got the right consistency or that I forgot to put on pants.

  • Thanks for the tips. :)


  • edited March 2013

    I'm new to cooking meat, so decided to try and make some broth in my crockpot, which I will later use to cook some short ribs.  I did not roast the bones, simply covered them with a lot of water and some veggies and spices and had it on the "low" temperature for approximately 24 hours.  The broth was not super gelatinous (probably bc the fat didn't completely liquify, but mostly stayed solid) but I'm wondering what you guys think about keeping the fat from the bone in there?  It seems that there's a lot of good stuff in this fat, and I'd like to consume it if I can.  I'm just worried about oxidization and keep seeing it mentioned, but I'm not sure exactly HOW worried I need to be about this. 


     


    This will also be relevant to when I cook the meat later, since short ribs are very fatty.  I don't want to throw away all that tasty goodness, it seems a waste :-)


  • Throw away the fat, its most likely oxidized.
    Please email me instead of PM

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  • I'm new to cooking meat, so decided to try and make some broth in my crockpot, which I will later use to cook some short ribs.  I did not roast the bones, simply covered them with a lot of water and some veggies and spices and had it on the "low" temperature for approximately 24 hours.  The broth was not super gelatinous (probably bc the fat didn't completely liquify, but mostly stayed solid) but I'm wondering what you guys think about keeping the fat from the bone in there?  It seems that there's a lot of good stuff in this fat, and I'd like to consume it if I can.  I'm just worried about oxidization and keep seeing it mentioned, but I'm not sure exactly HOW worried I need to be about this. 


     


    This will also be relevant to when I cook the meat later, since short ribs are very fatty.  I don't want to throw away all that tasty goodness, it seems a waste :smile:


     


     


     


    Depending on the level of heat (I don't know how hot your crock pot is on low,) there are people that simmer their stock for up to 5 days.  It should be pretty dark brown when done and definitely gelatinous when cooled.  The minimum is about 12 hours to make sure you get the most out of the bones (collagen, minerals etc.)

  • You gotta put the crockpot on high.  I never got any gelatin in my broth on low and tried it several times.  Then one fine day I did it on high for 12hrs and holy shit it's like brown jello.    magical


  • I did mine in a crock pot on low for two days and it did not gel at all, but the wife told me that was due to the citric acid i threw in.  I will try high next time, that's only one night Brandon?


  • The newer the bones the less time it takes to get a lot of gelatin.  I boil the same bones over and over until they basically crumble apart.  But I always try to keep at least one fresh bone in there.  I usually do at least 12 hours with fresh bones and go longer with used ones but i've never done more than 24 hours. I'm assuming the longer the better though.  I just don't think it's necessary.  I'm not sure what the temp of my crockpot is on high but it's a hamilton beach 8-quart.  I use bones, spring water, apple cider vinegar, and a bayleaf.  It won't turn gelatinous until it's been in the fridge for a while. 


     


    Does anyone have any creative ways to consume their broth?


  • I drink my broth like tea, beef tea.  Yummy, but then I always loved cow.  I found out that for sure citric acid makes the stock not gel. 


  • i use it to cook veggies, like kale or collards (or zucchini, broccoli, whatever). i salt it pretty well while simmering and then throw in a nice chunk of butter after removing from heat.  sooooooo good!


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