Substitute For Thinking? Sort Of...

I been paying attention to how my brain feels every time I think, I noticed certain parts of my brain receives a sensation depending on the type of thinking (doing mathematics, focus on speech,etc.. so if I can identify the specific part of my brain being used and just focus on it intensely will it help me to think faster? Is this basically how the brain "lifts"? 


After finishing a hard math problem there would be a radiating feeling in a specific part of the brain kind of like after working out a specific part of the body. So what if I just skip the math problems and just focus on achieving the same intensity in the specific area of my brain?


 


Indomitable- when you break you get right back up

Comments

  • edited March 2013

    sorry, but you're not remotely as close to understanding neural function as you seem to think..


    (to use the crude example of comparing the brain to a muscle, consider the burn in your biceps after a good set of curls- how much growth will your biceps receive from such a burn?  Well, turns out the burn isn't even necessary to muscular growth, and that you can achieve burns that are catabolic, not anabolic.  Further, even for 'burning' that is the result of proper stimuli to the bicep, growth isn't guaranteed, it's a function of more than just the stimuli in teh muscle, it's influenced by everything from diet to sleep to mood to hormonal environment.  Then, even if the stimulus is the proper one for growth, and all of the other relevant factors are controlled to promote growth, there's still very strong linkage between generic muscle fiber types-ratios, size/# of fibers, etc, and neuronal recruitment of both fibers on an individual level, and motor units as groups, ie different stimuli to different growht (think sprinters versus marathoners))


     


    hopefully that clarifies why your line of thinking doesn't even apply to muscular growth in a manner like you're looking for (keeping in mind that we know less about the brain's response to stimuli in these regards, and that they're likely to be many magnitudes more complex than anabolic/muscular signaling)


     


    definitely stick to the math problems, not something that merely makes you feel like you did.  while we're not as far along in understanding muscular growth and adaptation in response to stimuli as we would like to be, and are FAR less along in this regard with the brain, it is abundantly clear that the brain, like muscles, will respond/adapt favorably to many types of stimuli, so keep active mentally and physically, and structure these activities as best you can to foster the goals you have :D


  • sorry, but you're not remotely as close to understanding neural function as you seem to think..


    (to use the crude example of comparing the brain to a muscle, consider the burn in your biceps after a good set of curls- how much growth will your biceps receive from such a burn?  Well, turns out the burn isn't even necessary to muscular growth, and that you can achieve burns that are catabolic, not anabolic.  Further, even for 'burning' that is the result of proper stimuli to the bicep, growth isn't guaranteed, it's a function of more than just the stimuli in teh muscle, it's influenced by everything from diet to sleep to mood to hormonal environment.  Then, even if the stimulus is the proper one for growth, and all of the other relevant factors are controlled to promote growth, there's still very strong linkage between generic muscle fiber types-ratios, size/# of fibers, etc, and neuronal recruitment of both fibers on an individual level, and motor units as groups, ie different stimuli to different growht (think sprinters versus marathoners))


     


    hopefully that clarifies why your line of thinking doesn't even apply to muscular growth in a manner like you're looking for (keeping in mind that we know less about the brain's response to stimuli in these regards, and that they're likely to be many magnitudes more complex than anabolic/muscular signaling)


     


    definitely stick to the math problems, not something that merely makes you feel like you did.  while we're not as far along in understanding muscular growth and adaptation in response to stimuli as we would like to be, and are FAR less along in this regard with the brain, it is abundantly clear that the brain, like muscles, will respond/adapt favorably to many types of stimuli, so keep active mentally and physically, and structure these activities as best you can to foster the goals you have :D


    I think I was doing too much reading the other night on the focusing of chi energy and mantras and yes thanks for the clarification.

    Indomitable- when you break you get right back up

  • edited March 2013

    haha absolutely :)


     


    I think there's something to be said for keeping your mind 'on' as frequently as possible, and that at most times this is beneficial compared to the oh-so-cherished "standby" most love living in, but in no way does this really approach higher-functioning like mathematics or other abstracts (i'd consider it more the way i consider ppl who stay frequently active compared to sitting at a cubicle, and i'm NOT referring to 'active' as in exercise or anything, but just as in 'the opposite of sitting/sedentary', which is incredibly bad for us.  


    Even if you're not going for a run, or doing math problems (in fact you shouldn't aim to be so active all of your waking hours), you should make a point to never let mind/body go into 'standby' until it's time (ie bedtime)


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