Recovery From Workouts

I have been giving some thought to recovery as I heard here and there of it's high importance.  I heard from someone I am not sure I trust too much(a massage therapist)of taking alternating 30 seconds cold then hot showers would be useful.  I have started doing this after workouts when possible.  I have also spent about 30 min in the spa and done the bulk of my stretch routine there, holding each stretch 1 min.  I am not sure this is great either but I do enjoy the spa even if it doesn't really help.  I have tried deep tissue massage and again not sure it's any good but I do like it.


 


Can anyone advise if they found some measurable results one way or the other from some recovery technique?  I don't usually get any aches and pains from my workouts save when I alter them monthly so I cannot point to any tangible results from what I have tried.  I have made no small amount of progress myself but as I have altered in relatively short order diet and supplements so much it's hard to point to any one factor as being the difference.


 


If there was one thing that I would recommend it's stretching in the spa: as the muscles are warmed up after a work out and the hot water allow me to have made pretty good progress in gaining greater flexibility.


Comments

  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    Cold therapy will help with recovery.  Ditch the stretching and just stick with the deep tissue massage/foam roller/pain balling.  You might be surprised to find that those alone can be of great benefit to flexibility.


  • Stick with active stretching pre-workout rather than static stretching post-workout.  Static stretching can actually reduce performance and increase the risk of injury. 




    I agree with these guys that a foam roller and a lacrosse ball will do wonders, but if you've never used them before, go see a physical therapist or a chiropractor.  You can do some damage if you don't know what you're doing.  And although they can be a bit "uncomfortable," I'm a huge fan of ice baths.  A few minutes will leave you feeling better than stretching in the sauna any day!


     


    Last but not least, make sure you're getting plenty of sleep!  Lack of rest coupled with over-training will definitely hinder your results.


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    I've been using the Recharge suit from Under Armour on my rest days during a fight camp. Seems to make a difference, but is a bit restrictive as you're suppose to where it for 24hrs. As I train 6 days a week, normally twice-a-day, wearing it for 24hrs mean I can only really wear it on my rest day. Not sure if it's a placebo or if it actually does something. Got it 50% off as I probably wouldn't have bought it at full price.


     


    http://www.underarmour.com/shop/us/en/mens-recharge-energy-suit/pid1207677


     


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWbOWXV0BI0


     


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awnDnOP7kYc


    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well

  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    Thats all completely ambiguous.  What the hell does it do?  Pics? Details?


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    Thats all completely ambiguous.  What the hell does it do?  Pics? Details?


    _____________________


    You talking to me....? ;-)

    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well

  • While I've never seen a post-workout version, compression garments have been around for a long time, and do have a substantial effect.  I've used some from CEP with good results (information about the technology here http://www.cepcompression.com/Technology.aspx).  At the most basic level, compression garments used during a workout increase arterial flow, and with it, the amount of oxygen available to your muscles.  Not only helps with performance, but also recovery.


     


    I use ice-baths because it forces all of your blood to the core, effectively pumping all of the built up toxins and lactic acid out of your muscles.  When you get out, fresh blood rushes in, and you feel refreshed and recharged. 


     


    I could only wonder if the under-armour compression suit is attempting to accomplish one of these two things? I'd also be curious as to the effects of a vibration plate for post-workout recovery (since it would also help to pump all the waste material out of your muscles in theory?). 


     


    While I'm not working out nearly as much as Katolotus, I do crossfit 2-3x a week, and jiu-jitsu another 2-3x a week, so recovery is a pretty important topic for me (I know Dave would probably just say "do less!").  Keep the ideas coming!


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭
    edited April 2013

    Under Armour was the first company to convince athletes to wear skin-tight clothing during competition. Now they want you to sleep in it. The Under Armour Recharge is a compression garment designed to be worn after a workout.


    The Recharge, available July 15th, consists of a long-sleeve shirt ($99.99) and full-length pants ($89.99) with targeted compression in certain muscular regions. Athletes are instructed to change into the suit within two hours after a workout, and to continue wearing the garment for a full twenty-four hours. According to Under Armour, those willing to sleep and shop in a skin-tight leotard will be rewarded handsomely during future fitness endeavors.


    While UA won't release quantitative data, they promise the following to those who wear the suit for just 24 hours:


    • Significant reduction in muscle damage quantified by levels of creatine kinase in the blood
    • A reduction in subjective fatigue level by 50 percent
    • A reduction in subjective muscle soreness by 50 percent
    • A reduction in muscle swelling based on ultrasound muscle thickness
    • An increase in power based on bench-press throw

    The suit may sound similar to an Adidas garment we covered a few months back. Under Armour is quick to emphasize that they claim no performance benefits during competition, unlike the Adidas Powerweb, which uses thermoplastic strips to provide a mechanical advantage. The Recharge is focused solely on recovery.


     


    UA claims the Recharge's compression system prevents water from rushing into the muscles, which can lead to post-workout swelling. They also cite, as one of the benefits of the Recharge, something a bit more ambiguous: "dynamic casting" that supports muscles and therefore facilitates healing. As with the Adidas garment, a certain posturing support is obvious when worn, but how this helps recovery is not as clear. UA also notes that other compression garments focus on increasing blood flow, which they believe is not something most athletes struggle with after a workout. It is reasonable to wonder, independent of what the different garments' claim, whether others on the market would provide similar benefits if worn to bed under your flannel pajamas.


     


    The suit is currently a one-sport-fits-all model, which seems illogical. Presumably, different sports would accentuate different muscle groups, requiring modified compression. It's also uncertain how the effects of the suit vary for different body types of varying muscle size. You know, like for those of us who may not be as comfortable walking around Wal-Mart in head-to-toe Spandex...


    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well

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