Three Questions Before I Begin The Bp Diet

I've spent the past couple of days reading the majority of the literature on the website and searching the forums, but I've been unable to find an answer to my question.


 


Question #1: How are we measuring our protein, fat, fruit, carb, etc. intake? If we aren't counting calories then how is the measuring done?


 


Question #2: Is it possible to lose weight quickly by using the BP Diet only w/ out the fasting? 


 


The BP Diet sounds a lot like a diet I was on some years ago. It went something like: Eat two eggs in the morning, an orange twice a day in between meals, and for lunch and dinner, have unlimited protein/fat/green vegetables. No dairy products was allowed. You were to do this for two days before entering the second phase of the diet. It wasn't unusual to lose 2-3 lbs. during those two days. I'm thinking that the BP diet only could work because of its similarity to the 2 day routine I described. Don't get me wrong, I plan to carry out the fast but I wanna try the BP diet for at least a month first.


 


Question #3: How would you do the BP diet and IF at the same time? 


 


On the main site, the author says that one could lose weight quickly by doing the BP diet and IF. How would one do both? What I mean is: what would be the weekly breakdown of days spent on each?


 


Thanks for any helpful responses.


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Comments

  • I've spent the past couple of days reading the majority of the literature on the website and searching the forums, but I've been unable to find an answer to my question.


     


    Question #1: How are we measuring our protein, fat, fruit, carb, etc. intake? If we aren't counting calories then how is the measuring done?


     


    Question #2: Is it possible to lose weight quickly by using the BP Diet only w/ out the fasting? 


     


    The BP Diet sounds a lot like a diet I was on some years ago. It went something like: Eat two eggs in the morning, an orange twice a day in between meals, and for lunch and dinner, have unlimited protein/fat/green vegetables. No dairy products was allowed. You were to do this for two days before entering the second phase of the diet. It wasn't unusual to lose 2-3 lbs. during those two days. I'm thinking that the BP diet only could work because of its similarity to the 2 day routine I described. Don't get me wrong, I plan to carry out the fast but I wanna try the BP diet for at least a month first.


     


    Question #3: How would you do the BP diet and IF at the same time? 


     


    On the main site, the author says that one could lose weight quickly by doing the BP diet and IF. How would one do both? What I mean is: what would be the weekly breakdown of days spent on each?


     


    Thanks for any helpful responses.


     


    Answer to question #1:


     


    I take it that most people do it in their heads, for example, if you throughout your day have eaten the following: 


     


    3 eggs and a few slices for breakfast with coffee


     


    Handful of nuts as snack around noon


     


    Few slices of beef with a bunch of vegetables


     


    Steak with avocado and sorted vegetables


     


    By then you would be quite sure that your diet is either a high protein or high fat, depending on those cuts of meat that you ate and what type of nut you chose for snack. It is primarily a gut-feeling in this example. If you are pretty meticulous about your tracking, use an app, like FitDay for example. It allows you to be pretty precise in journaling your diet. 


     


    Answer to question #2:


     


    YEAH! Of course it is, IF is just a shortcut to weight loss. It of course depends on the very composition of your diet, you can do an all around moderate diet and still be totally BP, or you can do a ketogenic diet, being BP, and loose weight faster. 


     


    Answer to question #3:


     


    Well IF generally works this way: You have a window in where you will eat, this can be a 8/6/3 hour window depending on how you choose to do it. So in the window of eating you will just consume foods as if you were eating on a 24 hour schedule. 

  • 1. I simply would not measure especially at first.  You need to customize things according to your goals and what you can handle.  For example, you can just move to BP coffee and adding more fat to your diet.  The change is going to depend where you started from.  It sounds like you are wanting to lose weight.  Before starting get a handle on where you are with measurements, photographs and a scale.  You could get a body fat caliper too, depending again on where you are beginning from.


    2. You will lose weight but not quickly.


    3. With IF you are eating the same amount, just within a smaller time frame.  So normally I eat breakfast at 7am, lunch at noon, snack at 3 and dinner at 7.  On IF day I have BP coffee at 7am then lunch at 3, snack at 5 and dinner at 7pm.


  • Thanks for the replies. But in question 3, I was asking how does BP Diet and IF scheduling typically work throughout the week. For instance, do you normally do 5 days on the BP diet and 2 days on IF?


  • That`s up for debate honestly.  I normally go Monday, Tues, Thurs, Fri IF and off the other days.  To keep it random if a lunch date came up on an IF day I would do it.


  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful

    Everyone does IF every day, it's called sleep. Unless you're a meth addict that also eats a lot of food. So it's a bit of a misnomer. What we're suggesting here is that we trick the body (by only consuming fats for breakfast) to think that's it's in an extended fast - from 8pm until 2pm the next day. 


     


    If you need to lose weight:


    Bulletproof coffee EVERY morning. Then eat foods from the green side of the infographic between 2-8pm, no carbs. Carb refeed once a week.


     


    If you don't need to lose weight:


    Eat whatever you want from the green side. IF is up to you - this is where the biohacking comes in. 


    No sorcery, just science. 

  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress ✭✭

    Q1: if you have a smartphone get an app called MyFitnessPal where you can log your food. It gives you a breakdown of macros and lots more details. It's quite good!


  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    Fasting is liberating once you learn to do it.  I love it.  I go a full 24 hours every 2 weeks or so.


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    Thanks for the replies. But in question 3, I was asking how does BP Diet and IF scheduling typically work throughout the week. For instance, do you normally do 5 days on the BP diet and 2 days on IF?


    ______________________


    I do 6 out of 7 days

    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well

  • Conzed92Conzed92
    edited April 2013

    Have anyone seen the research on long-term fasting and corresponding elevation in glucocorticoids in the blood? An interesting question in relation to intermittent fasting is, when does the body adapt to IF and stop seeing it as a stressor? 


     


    Okay, as expected I found some very interesting material on the relationship between calorie restriction and elevation in plasma glucocorticoids:


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12392776


     


    Long-term glucocorticoid exposure, in practice, this would mean elevation of cortisol primarily, is well documented to be a factor in hippocampal atrophy, leading to expected symptoms of malfunction in the part of the brain that is the center for memory and emotional control such as cognitive impairment, emotional instability etc. This happens often to people that suffer from Cushing's disease (chronic elevation of cortisol, due to a tumor somewhere along the hormonal axis, often in the pituitary gland or the adrenal cortex) and is one of the disease's more permanent consequences, as it takes a much time to recover lost brain function and regenerate brain volume (though this is entirely possible, to state that the brain cannot grow new cells is simply stupid, and to all you males, testosterone seems to have a very important role in neurogenesis, YAY!). So, seeing how calorie restriction or long-term intermittent fasting causes your body to release both mineralcorticoids and glucocorticoids, both as a result of the calorie restriction which in itself is stressing to the body and also, primarily thinking the mineralcorticoids, to keep up blood sugar levels - might there be a trade-off to this methods for weight management/life extension? The researchers that published the above paper do recognise the possibility, however they deem that the pros outweigh the cons, calling this the glucocorticoid paradox. VERY MEGA INTERESTING FOR US PEOPLE :D


  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    Have anyone seen the research on long-term fasting and corresponding elevation in glucocorticoids in the blood? An interesting question in relation to intermittent fasting is, when does the body adapt to IF and stop seeing it as a stressor? 


    _______________________________________


    So I take it's good that it's a stressor?

    Katolotus

    MMA Fighter

     

    SUCCESS: A lot of little things done well

  • _______________________________________


    So I take it's good that it's a stressor?


     


    Well... If I was my body, all I would want for the day was just to be in homeostasis as long as possible. So the question is, really, when does a stressor become negative? It's positive or negative nature may be decided by a few factors, this would be expected, the body is not a simple mechanism by a long shot. Some interesting questions would be, how long am I exposed to this stressor, what kind of stressor is it (I believe that we humans are very well-adapted to physical stress, however the mental, I am convinced, will be the downfall of man :D) and can I in any way control my exposure to it? 


     


    I think when it comes to IF, one is balancing on the edge, a very nice edge because you reap a fantastic amount of benefits from it, like increased longevity, fat loss, increased insulin sensitivity and more time to do work now that food is temporarily taken out of the equation. However, do this in a not so clever way, coming close to mimicking anorexia, and boy, are you in for some trouble. One problem I have with Dave's enthusiastic recommendation of coffee as a primary delivery-vehicle for energy when doing IF is that, and I might be totally off track here, so please do excuse me, I am concerned about how much stress this puts on one's body. I think it is a very important thing to consider.    

  • I've spent the past couple of days reading the majority of the literature on the website and searching the forums, but I've been unable to find an answer to my question.


     


    Question #1: How are we measuring our protein, fat, fruit, carb, etc. intake? If we aren't counting calories then how is the measuring done?


     


    Question #2: Is it possible to lose weight quickly by using the BP Diet only w/ out the fasting? 


     


    The BP Diet sounds a lot like a diet I was on some years ago. It went something like: Eat two eggs in the morning, an orange twice a day in between meals, and for lunch and dinner, have unlimited protein/fat/green vegetables. No dairy products was allowed. You were to do this for two days before entering the second phase of the diet. It wasn't unusual to lose 2-3 lbs. during those two days. I'm thinking that the BP diet only could work because of its similarity to the 2 day routine I described. Don't get me wrong, I plan to carry out the fast but I wanna try the BP diet for at least a month first.


     


    Question #3: How would you do the BP diet and IF at the same time? 


     


    On the main site, the author says that one could lose weight quickly by doing the BP diet and IF. How would one do both? What I mean is: what would be the weekly breakdown of days spent on each?


     


    Thanks for any helpful responses.


     


    1. Enter everything you consume onto myfitnesspal.com.  You can still use it if you dont have a smartphone.  Pay attention to your ratio of carbs/protein/fat.  This diet is not unlimited protein, most of the research or expert commentary I have seen lately basically says no one should be consuming more than 80g of protein per day, and not more than 20 or 30g of protein can be used by the body at a time (per meal).  I would also cut fruit out as well or eat it just a few times per week.


     


    2. You will lose weight at a steady, healthy pace the more you stick to the green side of the diet.  More importantly, you will lose fat and gain muscle mass.  You can do it without the fasting, just stick to the BP diet.  To echo what others have said, BP IF fasting is very easy to get used to and most people enjoy it.  For me, the best part about the diet is the BP coffee and the amazing mental boost you will get from it and eating a 'green zone' BP diet.


     


    3. Have BP coffee in the morning, than eat your meals in a 6 hour window each day.  For example: 6am BP coffee, 12pm lunch, 6pm dinner.  The Coffee will keep you satisfied for a while.  Add more butter if it is not keeping you satisfied.  I started with a lot of butter in my BP coffee (up to 6 tbsp.) but I am now down to about 2 tbsp. I can easily go about 6 to 7 hours without any feelings of hunger.


     


    Good luck!  Remember, the more you stick to the green side of the diet, the better off you will be.  

  • 1. Enter everything you consume onto myfitnesspal.com.  You can still use it if you dont have a smartphone.  Pay attention to your ratio of carbs/protein/fat.  This diet is not unlimited protein, most of the research or expert commentary I have seen lately basically says no one should be consuming more than 80g of protein per day, and not more than 20 or 30g of protein can be used by the body at a time (per meal).  I would also cut fruit out as well or eat it just a few times per week.


     


    2. You will lose weight at a steady, healthy pace the more you stick to the green side of the diet.  More importantly, you will lose fat and gain muscle mass.  You can do it without the fasting, just stick to the BP diet.  To echo what others have said, BP IF fasting is very easy to get used to and most people enjoy it.  For me, the best part about the diet is the BP coffee and the amazing mental boost you will get from it and eating a 'green zone' BP diet.


     


    3. Have BP coffee in the morning, than eat your meals in a 6 hour window each day.  For example: 6am BP coffee, 12pm lunch, 6pm dinner.  The Coffee will keep you satisfied for a while.  Add more butter if it is not keeping you satisfied.  I started with a lot of butter in my BP coffee (up to 6 tbsp.) but I am now down to about 2 tbsp. I can easily go about 6 to 7 hours without any feelings of hunger.


     


    Good luck!  Remember, the more you stick to the green side of the diet, the better off you will be.  


     


    On your answer to question #1.


    It is true that high protein diets are not the way to go long term. There is emerging evidence that high protein diets even block some of the channels in the liver. Stressing both the liver and kidneys seem like a the highway to physical damnation :D 

  • How high is high that this evidence states?


     


    How high the protein ratio is mr Miller?

  • I do IF with BP Coffee about 6 days a week and try to have less than 30 grams of carbs a day except for carb re-feed days. I measure how much I'm eating on myfitnesspal.

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