Question On High Insulin Levels And Health

So already from starting this topic, I realise that this is a very complicated topic to discuss with multiple angels of approach, however I do not see a problem with establishing a baseline of information that explains the notion ''high insulin levels are dangerous''. Therefore, I hope that by posting a topic dealing with this matter, we all can become a little more enlightened on how to manage such a vital part of our lives that health is. I will start with the one major problem that I see in relation to chronically elevated insulin levels:


 


1. Chronically elevated insulin levels reflect multiple spikes of blood glucose a day, something which in it self is dangerous.


 


Okay, so from a very simple point of view, let us look at this in depth. Elevation in insulin occurs when the level of blood glucose starts to go up, as a consequence of food intake, primarily thinking proteins and carbohydrates (Fat partially blunts the elevation of insulin? Anybody agree?). In itself this is not a problem, without this mechanism humanity would have succumbed to diabetes a very damn long time ago. However, as I understand, the problem arises when this happens on a regular basis, in effect leading to chronically elevated levels of insulin, thereby setting off a whole array of metabolic mechanisms. The consequences of this we identify as diabetes 1/2(3), Alzheimers/dementia (What can also be called type 3 diabetes, or dysfunctional energy usage in the brain). In relation to diabetes, a high level of insulin in the blood becomes a problem for a variety of reasons. First, the islet cells of the pancreas can only handle so much, as is evident in people with type 1 diabetes. Of course, there is a genetic component at play here, however, these very cells still do stop to function properly no matter what is causing it, leading to the inevitable outcome of loss of endogenous insulin production, diabetes 1. By extension, people become sick, because they no longer retain the ability to regulate their own blood suar, at least not without medicine, big problem. For type 2 diabetics the problem is a little different, however just as interesting. So for people with diabetes 2 the question is not too little insulin, it is insensitivity, the receptor molecules in the cells cannot make use of the insulin hormone because the body is already full of energy, the cell is literally saying ''Well we are full, maybe somebody down the road needs whatever it is that you are selling mr Insulin''. So Mr Insulin has to go somewhere else to sell off his glucose to other housewives on Body Street (yeah bad metaphor, however I hope that I am getting my point across). The problem is, nobody needs that glucose, or at least the body has now become so insensitive to insulin because of prolonged exposure to elevation of this hormone, for such a long time that this regulation is just knocked out. So now there is all this glucose running around in the tissues of people, and let me point out here, sugar cannot carry around oxygen, so at some point people with both type 1 and 2 diabetes will experience necrosis in their peripheral tissues like feet and hands. All in all, MAJOR PROBLEM. 


 


Furthermore, as noted above, elevated insulin levels are a reflection of something else, continuous spiking of blood glucose. What does this tell somebody having a look at, let us say the blood panel of somebody where this is the cas? The person must obviously be ingesting a hell of a lot of carbohydrates, in fact so many, that the body is taking damage from it, and on top of this, this person is likely to be sedentary for most the day, because all this energy is clearly not being utilised for anything constructive like building muscle etc. So here is why I am posting this topic in the first place:


 


Is it reasonable that one could very likely assume that these chronically elevated insulin levels reflect poor dietary choices, and therefore use it as evidence to consult the individual with this blood reading that these ways are ways of the past, shit has got to go buddy and anybody with this profile should make drastic lifestyle changes? - My answer would be, yes. 


 


An interesting side note to this is: What about people who cannot control the release of insulin? Like, people who have rare neuroendocrine tumors called insulinomas. They will also have elevations in their insulin levels, BUT imagine that such a person would follow a 100% BP diet, do you think the consequences would be similar? 


 


Man, I have to finish this now as I am heading out the door, however I would really appreciate thoughts on this :D Thank you in advance guys.


Comments

  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    Fat will blunt the insulin index of certain foods by stretching out the absorption profile of the food.  Fat itself does have an insulin index though.  Its nothing like eating some pure fat will lower your insulin levels.


     


    Chronically elevated insulin levels only would not have the same effects of chronically elevated insulin levels with elevated blood sugar levels.  The combination of those 2 thing is what increases your risk factors for different diseases.


     


    It would be difficult to have chronically elevated insulin levels without the accompaniment of elevated blood sugar unless there was some preexisting condition like you mention.


  • Fat will blunt the insulin index of certain foods by stretching out the absorption profile of the food.  Fat itself does have an insulin index though.  Its nothing like eating some pure fat will lower your insulin levels.


     


    Chronically elevated insulin levels only would not have the same effects of chronically elevated insulin levels with elevated blood sugar levels.  The combination of those 2 thing is what increases your risk factors for different diseases.


     


    It would be difficult to have chronically elevated insulin levels without the accompaniment of elevated blood sugar unless there was some preexisting condition like you mention.


     


    Aha! Yes, I was sure that the combination was the trick. Thank you for your answer :)

  •  

    An interesting side note to this is: What about people who cannot control the release of insulin? Like, people who have rare neuroendocrine tumors called insulinomas. They will also have elevations in their insulin levels, BUT imagine that such a person would follow a 100% BP diet, do you think the consequences would be similar? 

     

    Man, I have to finish this now as I am heading out the door, however I would really appreciate thoughts on this :D Thank you in advance guys.


     





    You went through loads of points


    - a ketogenic diet might cause a problem with circulating insulin and may increase circulating levels

    -High fat/high protien diet/low carb = lower circulating insulin



    -If a diabetic combined Fat with carbs he will release more insulin than needed

    this isnt the same for someone who isnt.


    -Combining protein with carbs will release more insulin than if they were eaten seperatly



    Foods which cause the lowest amout of insulin to be released

    - protein : egg whites

    - fat : what ever, Omega 3 might releases the least but the difference is minimal for normal people

    - carbs: veg, whole wheat pasta (but not gluten free)



    -Spiking insulin by eating carbs throughout the day isnt a bad thing as long as your not gaining weight and or diabetic
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