Organic Valley Grassmilk (New Product?)

I saw this product at Whole Foods.



Normally I stay away from milk at all costs. I consider the carbs to be basically the same as sugar.



But the "100% grassfed" on the carton was too much for me to resist. So I bought a couple of the whole milk containers (which claim to be organic and non homogenized).



So... can this product be beneficial to a Bulletproof diet? If so, how and when is the best way to take it?

Comments

  • Even if it's grass fed you are really best to avoid dairy (aside from butter and Ghee) unless it's grass-fed and Raw.
  • Danno RedDanno Red Practical Man

    It should have the CLA/omega-3 a ruminant should have without the addition of fish oil as many organic milks are fortified with.


  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭
    edited April 2014

    Interesting! If it's organic, grass-fed and non-homogenized, then it's likely leagues above any other milk you'd be able to find in a grocery store. Raw would be better, granted, but if milk is something you want to include in your diet, then something like this is probably the best you'll find in a store.


     


    Now, is it BP? Probably not. But if you drink it in moderation and have no problems with dairy, it's probably not terribly harmful, either. Let us know how it tastes! I'll have to look for this stuff near me, as my kids ADORE milk. I refuse to buy them the regular crap, though. This sounds like a much better alternative.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • I think Organic Valley (the actual farm) is located near me. If it's the right one I see their cows grazing happily out in the fields. Unless it's just a "cover" ;)


    It's definitely not BP as was already said--but go for it, for a rare treat. I would also mention if you tolerate dairy; raw milk is best as it retains all the good enzymes and can be a source of good bacteria too. If I drive by this farm again and think of it I will be sure to update my post, maybe even with a picture for you.


  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭


    I think Organic Valley (the actual farm) is located near me. If it's the right one I see their cows grazing happily out in the fields. Unless it's just a "cover" ;)




     


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    Organic Valley is a co-op, which many different farms all over the country have bought into. So the farm you drive past may well be one of them, but it's one of many. OV has certain standards, which are generally very good, but even for eggs they are not entirely bulletproof. Because the farms are spread out, OV hens in California may always have access to the outdoors, whereas OV hens in Minnesota may be kept inside during the winter.


     


    You can read their standards and practices on their site. They are good enough for me, I buy their eggs and their cottage cheese, and their cultured butter is my go-to if Kerrygold is out of stock. But none of it is 100% bulletproof. Except maybe the butter, actually, I recall reading that Jack Kruse had it tested for K2 and it beat Kerrygold in year-round consistency. It's just that it's hard to find unsalted in my area. 

  • it is not grass fed


    even so..its still some how non organic


  • Danno RedDanno Red Practical Man

    Hey, I ran across this grass-fed regional creamery...it's low-fat milks are homogenized, but the 2% & whole (and cream products) are just pasteurized. No vested interest, just wanted to share for those looking for healthier dairy choices but not yet willing to go raw. I truly hope the FDA permits special labeling for a new, light-pasteurization criteria. I'll try it if I ever see it in a Costco! ;-)


     


    www.TricklingSpringsCreamery.com


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