Layman Terms: Ces Vs Tdcs Vs Heg

Guys, can someone breakdown in like a 2-3 sentence breakdown in layman terms between all three of them. I'm still trying to differentiate between the three. I think CES is for sleep, tDCS is for concentration and HEG is for mood/performance/concentration? How do they differ?  Thanks !


Comments

  • Sure thing, Mike.  Let us begin by first categorizing different brain tools into two areas.  First, the devices that put things into your brain and Second, the devices that measure how your brain in functioning.  In the first category we have sensory input like binaurals and isochronics, electrostimulation like CES and tDCS, and I will even dare to put nootropics in this category.  In the second, we have different forms of bio and neurofeedback like HEG, heart rate variability, tap nervous function, and others.  Depending on your goals, you could use one, or a combination of methods to stimulate your brain and quantify your results.  Now that you have the big picture, let me address some of the specifics:


     


    CES (Cranial electrostimulation) - This is a device that clips onto the ears, or is affixed to the temples to stimulate your brain using a specific frequency.  Each frequency has a different effect on the brain.  You could use CES to "entrain" your brain into an Alpha state for focus, Gama for alertness, Theta for creativity (sub-theta for sleep,) and others.  CES is a bit more subtle than tDCS, but it involves the brain on a global scale.


     


    tDCS (transcranial direct-current stimulation) - This uses anode and cathode points to stimulate specific centers of the brain.  Most people use a dual channel setup, but I have seen sixteen point stimulation with some fairly advanced programming.  The effects of tDCS are more profound than CES, but the risk is a bit higher too.  Neurologists have used tDCS to target certain areas of the brain to decrease pain, stop depression and anxiety, enhance motor control, enhance quantitative reasoning, enhance communication, and I am sure that there are other proven applications as well.


     


    HEG (Hemoencephalography) - This uses inferred sensors to measure the blood flow in the brain.  Unlike EEG, HEG is thousands of times faster which has a huge advantage when doing neurofeedback training.  Unlike other stimulation methods, you must stimulate your own brain with an HEG device and an associated program will let you know how you are doing.  One could potentially use HEG for numerous types of applications.


     


    I hope that that helped, Mike.  Let me know if you have further questions.  If you have specific goals that you would like to achieve, I may be able to recommend a few products that will get you where you want to go at a faster rate.


  • Sure thing, Mike.  Let us begin by first categorizing different brain tools into two areas.  First, the devices that put things into your brain and Second, the devices that measure how your brain in functioning.  In the first category we have sensory input like binaurals and isochronics, electrostimulation like CES and tDCS, and I will even dare to put nootropics in this category.  In the second, we have different forms of bio and neurofeedback like HEG, heart rate variability, tap nervous function, and others.  Depending on your goals, you could use one, or a combination of methods to stimulate your brain and quantify your results.  Now that you have the big picture, let me address some of the specifics:


     


    CES (Cranial electrostimulation) - This is a device that clips onto the ears, or is affixed to the temples to stimulate your brain using a specific frequency.  Each frequency has a different effect on the brain.  You could use CES to "entrain" your brain into an Alpha state for focus, Gama for alertness, Theta for creativity (sub-theta for sleep,) and others.  CES is a bit more subtle than tDCS, but it involves the brain on a global scale.


     


    tDCS (transcranial direct-current stimulation) - This uses anode and cathode points to stimulate specific centers of the brain.  Most people use a dual channel setup, but I have seen sixteen point stimulation with some fairly advanced programming.  The effects of tDCS are more profound than CES, but the risk is a bit higher too.  Neurologists have used tDCS to target certain areas of the brain to decrease pain, stop depression and anxiety, enhance motor control, enhance quantitative reasoning, enhance communication, and I am sure that there are other proven applications as well.


     


    HEG (Hemoencephalography) - This uses inferred sensors to measure the blood flow in the brain.  Unlike EEG, HEG is thousands of times faster which has a huge advantage when doing neurofeedback training.  Unlike other stimulation methods, you must stimulate your own brain with an HEG device and an associated program will let you know how you are doing.  One could potentially use HEG for numerous types of applications.


     


    I hope that that helped, Mike.  Let me know if you have further questions.  If you have specific goals that you would like to achieve, I may be able to recommend a few products that will get you where you want to go at a faster rate.


     


    Are there specific programs/devices you would recommend for each category? I use 'Magic Mind' on the iPhone for isochronic beats, which seems to work pretty well so far.


     


    I'm looking for a good CES device to beginning to experiment in this area of brain hacking ;).

  • The best CES out there is the Oasis Pro:


     


    http://www.mindalive.com/Products_OASIS_Pro.htm


     


    You can special order one with "Bulletproof" firmware (with doubled frequencies to recreate Dave's experiment.)  I would really like to own one of these, but my wife will not let me spend four hundred and fifty American dollars on cranial stimulation.


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