First Attempt At Bone Broth - No Gelatin!?

McTech0911McTech0911 RAW Grass Fed Protein Bars

I finished my first batch in bone broth and after it cooled there was no gelatin at all. After cooling since last night It has a watery consistency. I followed this recipe: http://balancedbites.com/2011/04/easy-recipe-mineral-rich-bone-broth.html


 


I used a crock pot on the low setting starting at 8pm and the following morning it was lightly boiling so shut it until it cooled a little then put it back on. I tried not to let the broth boil during the 24 hour simmer, so was turning it on and off. After 20 hours I moved it to a large covered pot on the stove and simmered which is how I plan to cook next time.


 


I used large marrow grass-fed beef bones from here: http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Detail.bok?no=557


 


I boiled it for 24 hours because the bones were extremely hard and did not show any signs of breaking down whatsoever. Even after the 24 hours the bones were still rock solid with barey anything missing off the surface. I saved the bones to add to the next batch because they seemed like they still have plenty to give.


 


I used 3 bones and added 2 tbs apple cider vinegar and 1 tsp himalayan sea salt to the mix. 


 


It tastes good, but no gelatin at all


 


Did I use the wrong bones? 


Did I cook too long?


Did I not cook long enough for those kinds of bones?


Should I use different bones next time? What kind for beef?


Did I overcook and destroy the collagen/gelatin?


 


Thanks!


 


RAW Grass Fed Protein Bars

 

Supplier of 100% Grass Fed Pasture Raised Whey Protein Bars

 

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  • i've cooked mine for days and days, so i doubt that's the issue.  i always soak the bones in the water with close to a quarter cup of apple cider vinegar for at least an hour before boiling (which kills the enzymatic activity of the vinegar).  if it's about the amount of water, i bet you're still getting the gelatin, but it's dilute.  kinda perplexing, though


  • McTech0911McTech0911 RAW Grass Fed Protein Bars

    Attempt #2 and were gellin!! Used GF beef knuckle bone cartlidge and oxtail and reused the marrow bones from last batch. Cooked 24 hours on low- no boil and were gellin magellan!


    RAW Grass Fed Protein Bars

     

    Supplier of 100% Grass Fed Pasture Raised Whey Protein Bars

     

    www.rawgrassfedproteinbars.com

  • I made mine in a slow cooker too and i found that you have to have it set to 'high'.  It makes a huge difference.  I hate the idea of using that much electricity because i ran it for 48 hrs but if you want to get the gelatin out ya gotta do what you gotta do.  


  • McTech0911McTech0911 RAW Grass Fed Protein Bars

    It was my understanding that cooking on high or boiling can break down the collagen and gelatin and prevent gelling from occuring. Either way the broth still stays mineral rich I read.


    RAW Grass Fed Protein Bars

     

    Supplier of 100% Grass Fed Pasture Raised Whey Protein Bars

     

    www.rawgrassfedproteinbars.com

  • older thread but I wanted to contribute my experience. I couldn't get bone broth to gel, then made a simple shift and now it's almost too thick, like applesauce.  For me, the key was mentioned above. I put the water in the crockpot, mix in a couple tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, stir it up, then put the bones in and I let them sit in the water at room temperature for 2 hours before I start heating them. Then I put the crockpot on low and with batch 1, I go 48 hours. Then I repeat the process with the same bones and go for 72 hours. Now I get two batches of bone broth. Awesome. Had never thought to re-use the bones but was advised to do so by an experienced bone broth person and it worked great.  The second batch wasn't as thick as the first batch, but still tastes and looks great.


  • I'm skipping into the world of home made bone broth this weekend for the first time. I'm worried about leaving the cooker on overnight so plan on just doing it for 12 hours? is that enough? I have some grass fed bones and some marrow in bones which i plan on roasting first to eat the marrow itself. I actually have a bag of the BP Collagelatin so as it's only going for 12 hours i could beef it up (huh huh) with some extra powder.


    Do you add any veggies towards the end for flavour?


  • googlealchemistgooglealchemist Alchemist

    I always thought the vinegar was having the effect from it's acidity...is adding it to hot/boiling water right away really a problem enzymatically?


     


    Never really thought about gellatin/consistency before either, but it varies...I just let it rip for at least 24hrs and figured that sucked out all the good stuff


     


    Would be interesting if someone somehow ran some tests to see what level of minerals, collagen, etc came out in the first batch vs the second...or by using different heats, timing of vinegar, length of times etc




    i've cooked mine for days and days, so i doubt that's the issue.  i always soak the bones in the water with close to a quarter cup of apple cider vinegar for at least an hour before boiling (which kills the enzymatic activity of the vinegar).  if it's about the amount of water, i bet you're still getting the gelatin, but it's dilute.  kinda perplexing, though




     


     




    older thread but I wanted to contribute my experience. I couldn't get bone broth to gel, then made a simple shift and now it's almost too thick, like applesauce.  For me, the key was mentioned above. I put the water in the crockpot, mix in a couple tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, stir it up, then put the bones in and I let them sit in the water at room temperature for 2 hours before I start heating them. Then I put the crockpot on low and with batch 1, I go 48 hours. Then I repeat the process with the same bones and go for 72 hours. Now I get two batches of bone broth. Awesome. Had never thought to re-use the bones but was advised to do so by an experienced bone broth person and it worked great.  The second batch wasn't as thick as the first batch, but still tastes and looks great.





  • I'm skipping into the world of home made bone broth this weekend for the first time. I'm worried about leaving the cooker on overnight so plan on just doing it for 12 hours? is that enough? I have some grass fed bones and some marrow in bones which i plan on roasting first to eat the marrow itself. I actually have a bag of the BP Collagelatin so as it's only going for 12 hours i could beef it up (huh huh) with some extra powder.


    Do you add any veggies towards the end for flavour?




     


    12 hours isn't enough. What is your concern leaving it on overnight? Is it a slow cooker, like a crockpot? Those are designed to be left on overnight and/or for extended periods of time. Or maybe you have electrical issues you're concerned about?  I just had mine on for 72 straight hours. I won't do it for less than 48.

  • So 12 hours is essentially pointless? The main worry is i will be using an electric hob to cook with a standard cooking pot and naturally feel uneasy leaving it on over night, even though it's obvious nothing can really happen. What about cooking for 12 hours, turning off over night then doing another 12 hours the following day? I'll be reinforcing with the CollaGellatin powder.


     




    12 hours isn't enough. What is your concern leaving it on overnight? Is it a slow cooker, like a crockpot? Those are designed to be left on overnight and/or for extended periods of time. Or maybe you have electrical issues you're concerned about?  I just had mine on for 72 straight hours. I won't do it for less than 48.



  • No clue. I wouldn't say it's pointless, you'll have a nice base for soup, but in 12 hours I think you're going to get a fraction of the nutrients and benefits you'd get going 48-72 hours. 


     


    you can get a great crockpot for under $50. This is the one I got, love it.


     


    http://www.amazon.com/Crock-Pot-SCCPVL610-S-Programmable-Cooker-6-Quart/dp/B004P2NG0K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461324815&sr=8-1&keywords=crockpot


  • I think it's clear I'll get more out of it from 24 hours minimum and my life will be so much easier if i get a slow cooker, so i ended up ordering one. Cheers for the advice!


    In the interim i found an awesome pop up shop selling 24 hour cooked grass-fed bone broth here in the UK. Tasted incredible, forgot to ask what veggies they add for taste etc.


  • I have a similar question as the original post. I'm using larger bones in a batch right now. I couldn't break them up. Does this reduce the mineral content? Is there extra prep I could be doing?


  • I have been making bone broth for years in my pressure cooker. I have an aversion to leaving home with appliances running. I have neve had to break bone up as mentioned in other posts. I simply put them in my pressure cooker, add water to 3/4 full, 2Tbsp of vinegar, and fire it up. Once the pressure jiggler jiggles, cut the heat down so the jiggler releases pressure once a minute, in ONE hour....broth is done! My broth gels once it's in the refrigerator. I use my bones about 3 times, the collagen is pretty cooked out by then.
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