Basic Chocolate

mmejoannammejoanna ✭✭
edited June 2013 in Recipes

• In double boiler* put cocoa butter and coconut oil. Use more cocoa butter than coconut oil.


• When melted, add cocoa powder - about as much powder as your fats.


• Add sweetener to taste****


• Add optional stuff to taste (vanilla, spices, salt, nuts, berries)


• You will have a vat of melted chocolate.


• Pour it into something and put into fridge to solidify**


 


****Sweetener:


I took a class on this, and the teacher was all about using raw honey. This is what I will try next time. You can use almost anything. I used to use Xylitol - my only warning is before you pour the chocolate into your molds make sure the Xylitol is really blended - it can become a little sludgy at the bottom of your vat of chocolate. Also, when you eat the chocolate you may notice the crystals of Xylitol as you chew - so the finer grain the better.


 


**Pouring:


I own silicone ice cube trays for this purpose, and candy-making molds.


A good idea I saw on You Tube:  someone poured his chocolate mixture into a thin puddle on a cookie sheet- to be shattered later for chocolate chips.


 


*Double Boiler:


It's a big pot partially filled with water, with a bowl on top. Boil the water in the pot to heat the contents of the bowl. Bowl size: a bigger bowl can ride high on the pot, or a smaller bowl can be partially submerged in the water. For this purpose, I'd go for the latter. Next time I make chocolate I'll take some step by step photos.


 


Advanced:


Sometimes the fat separates a little, and you get white edges on your chocolate (see my photo). The good news: It still tastes awesome.


Possible fix?? I was in Paris last summer and spoke to a for-real chocolatier about my basic process. He said I should not put the chocolate into the fridge right away, but wait 24 hours. I am not sure if this will solve or exacerbate the separation issue, but I plan to try that next time.


 


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Comments

  • Awesome. 'Preciate cha!


  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    What is your unit of measurement for this recipe?  Volume or mass?


  • No measurement. Eyeballs. This is how the teacher in my class taught. 


     


    I've thought about measuring - to be able to try variations and improve the recipe in a repeatable way...  But I haven't got around to it.  At the time I was more concerned with getting the Xylitol to behave itself  : )


  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    Oh ok.  Eyeballing is a volume measurement believe it or not.


  • Oh ok.  Eyeballing is a volume measurement believe it or not.


     


    Hm... I can see that!   : )

  • katolotuskatolotus ✭✭✭

    Looks great, but I can't control myself around too much BP food. I'd eat the lot in one go :-( No self control


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  • Looks great, but I can't control myself around too much BP food. I'd eat the lot in one go :sad: No self control


     


    I know what you mean, I can overdo on the sweets especially.

  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭

    I might try it with coconut nectar or sugar I will let you know how ti goes.


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  • From what I know of Chocolate making the problem may not be with Xylitol it may actually be with the way that chocolate forms itself. Often when you see Chocolatiers preparing chocolate they pour it onto a marble slab and start to mix it as it cools. This is known as tempering chocolate and it makes sure chocolate forms the right structure as it cools and doesn't seperate. Now you can get a giant slab of marble and spend a ton of time mixing it as it cools or you can get some premade chocolate (either a batch with no Xylitol crystals or a store brand 85% cacao bar) and put it into your next batch of chocolate, make sure to put it in as the vat of chocolate is cooling. From my understanding this aligns the molecules to the appropriate structure.


    Using honey would probably cut out the need to temper the chocolate because it is never in a crystalized state and would mix better and not want to recrystalize in the chocolate as it cools.




  • I might try it with coconut nectar or sugar I will let you know how ti goes.




     


    Ron, since u mentioned it I am interested to hear your thoughts on Coconut Palm Nectar .. I have a bag in my pantry right along side the Eythritol and Xylitol but always wondered how "bulletproof" Coconut palm sugar is


     


    I love the taste but try to use it sparingly 

  • Just got some butter and powder during the sale for the first time. Will be trying this out. Thank you
  • mmejoanna, you might be my hero. <3


     


    I was just contemplating how much I was going to miss chocolate covered coffee beans because of the bad chocolate/bad beans.


    You just taught me how to make good chocolate.


    I have the good beans on order.


     


    Bulletproof chocolate covered coffee beans, anyone?


  • No bitterness with the Xylitol? Do you have a brand recommendation? I know from past experience (pre BP) stevia cannot be used for chocolate making. I've had some luck with Truvia.
  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    I read they make coconut sugar from the same part they use for coconut oil, and they can only make either sugar or oil, not both... so if coconut sugar gets popular that means less coconut oil will be made and that's not good.


     


    I have a question, I've seen "raw honey" mentioned everywhere, is that something special, or simply a fancy name for honey which has not been heated?


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  • Reka, raw honey typically refers to "straight from the hive". Most honey is ruined (pasteurized, blended, filtered, or other things) before hitting shelves.
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