Fry Pans And Carcinogens..?

Hi all,

I know the kind of cooking that one does is important for being bulletproof. I live in student accommodation with only a stove and a microwave. Besides buying a steamer, I would like to try to stick with my pan if i can. (steamed meat and or eggs can be lame)



The question is, i fry in oil such as coconut or organic butter, if I have a non stick pan (that seems to burn itself) do i need to worry about the carcinogens from the burnt irremovable patches on the pan getting into the food? Or is it okay as long as i dont burn the food itself? Or should i get a non stick one? I've heard about the carcinogens coming from the 'non stick' part of non stick pans too...



Thanks heaps for your help,

Kittykat

Comments

  • Cast-iron is best, but a decent restaurant-quality non non-stick pan would be fine too.



    I use this one: http://www.amazon.com/Winware-3-Ply-Stainless-Silicone-Sleeve/dp/B001BFX5A0/ref=sr_1_57?ie=UTF8&qid=1337787388&sr=8-57



    It has held up beautifully.



    I think over time you'll be able to experiment with cooking styles in a pan like that and be able to gently fry, baste, or saute your meat/veg without scorching it or over-heating the oil.



    Anything you're able to do is going to be better than eating dorm-food! Also, check out the FlavorWave oven. I think there's a small version you could use in a dorm.



    For steaming, I use this type of set-up: http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Quart-Stainless-Steamer-Cooker/dp/B000SSSVGY/ref=sr_1_6?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1337787622&sr=1-6



    Allows you to save the steamer water for use in soups...like if you steam asparagus, just plop it back into the steamer water, add butter and salt, blend into a soup...delicious image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
  • Awesome, what do you know about the potential carcinogenic particles that could come from a non stick pan with burnt patches, onto ones food? I am assuming if burning ones actual food is bad, then getting burnt patches from the pan onto the food would also be bad...



    Kittykat
  • Dave mentioned in one of the podcasts that one of the benefits of cast iron can come back to bite you. Cast iron retains and reradiates heat very well. This will cause your food to continue cooking well after it's removed from the heat. Instead he has turned to a light-weight enameled cookware after being "burned" buy the expensive Le Cruset cast iron enameled stuff. He mentions the brand name "Tivoli" which he picked up at his local department store.



    I use Scanpan cookware. It's pricy, and based on what I heard Dave say about Titanium exposure, maybe not what I should be using. I started using it in response to teflon exposure. Scanpan cookware uses a titanium-ceramic "alloy" fired at 30,000 degrees. According to the manufacturer (not the least biased source) this finish just doesn't come off at normal temperatures. I don't understand enough about how things might interact with the titanium in the pan at a molecular level to know how much exposure to titanium if any you would see cooking with this stuff. I can say that while expensive, the pans and their non-stick finish last for years and years. I have a 12" pan that was in rotation for 7 years before I replaced it because the finish chipped tragically when I dropped the pan on a rock while camping. I know, a 12" fry pan on a camping trip? There wasn't an unlucky sherpa carrying this thing on a trek to Everest or anything. It takes a lot of eggs to cure the hangover of 6 adults "camping" in the Santa Cruz Mountains where there are so many great wineries within driving distance.
  • 'kitty' wrote:


    Awesome, what do you know about the potential carcinogenic particles that could come from a non stick pan with burnt patches, onto ones food? I am assuming if burning ones actual food is bad, then getting burnt patches from the pan onto the food would also be bad...



    Kittykat




    There's not really any reason to get burnt patches...and I'm not suggesting you get a non-stick pan...use a little water and cook at lower-temps and you should be fine. There's really no reason to use a teflon pan or a scan-pan (I have one, but don't use it anymore...I just don't trust that it's safe and the finish has worn significantly after two years of use). Yes, cast-iron holds heat, but if you use it properly, it's fine. I use it to cook steaks or burgers; start them on the stove top, then pop in the oven so I don't smoke up my apartment.
  • 'dpwdan' wrote:


    Yes, cast-iron holds heat, but if you use it properly, it's fine.




    Yes, my immediate thought was "just remove the food from the pan, then the radient heat from the pan doesn't matter".
  • Okay thanks guys, Yeah i have a massive smoke problem with my apartment. Its a tiny student box. So the smoke alarm is right next to my kitchen. image/sad.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':(' /> really frustrating. I will do my best with the one i have, and if i really struggle with it then i will go and find a good non stick one. I dont know if we have the flavour wave in australia, but likely a variant i could always ask for for my birthday.. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />



    kittykat

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