"got Some" Chocolate Ice Cream (My Tweaks To Original "get Some" Recipe)

edited July 2013 in Recipes

I've been tinkering with the original "Get Some" ice cream recipe and here's what I've come up with. I call it "Got Some" chocolate ice cream because in my opinion it's better served as a post-coital treat  :mrgreen:


 


«1

Comments

  • Out of interest, what does the Vitamin C do for the recipe? Is it just for added health benefits, or does adjust the taste slightly? I keep meaning to try the ice cream recipe, but don't have an ice cream machine. I might just make it into a smoothie or try some of the more old school methods of manually making ice cream.




  • Out of interest, what does the Vitamin C do for the recipe? Is it just for added health benefits, or does adjust the taste slightly? I keep meaning to try the ice cream recipe, but don't have an ice cream machine. I might just make it into a smoothie or try some of the more old school methods of manually making ice cream.




     


    I believe it's added for taste (imparts some tartness) - you could use a few drops of apple cider vinegar as well. However, some people seem to leave it out altogether.


     


    If you don't have an ice cream maker, you can get a yogurt-like consistency in a blender - I would then freeze the blended mixture for 20 minutes to thicken it, then re-blend and you should have a good milkshake!

  • Since he says to use it "...or 10 drops apple cider vinegar or lime juice to taste" I guess it is just for taste...


  • For a second there I thought the vitamin C could be acting as a stabilizer... but it's not on the list of ice cream stabilizers I found:


    http://www.icecreamgeek.com/?p=664


     


    BTW are any of these BP?


    • Guar gum comes from guar beans, which are mainly grown in India. The beans are processed into a white powder and used as an emulsifier and as a thickener that’s eight times as powerful as cornstarch.
    • Locust bean gum comes from the seeds of the Carob tree, which anyone unfortunate enough to be allergic to chocolate will be familiar with, because carob is often used as a chocolate substitute (ehh, sort of, anyway).  It also has a nicer-sounding name: carob bean gum. The white powder is used as a thickener, stabilizer, emulsifier, and gelling agent. It’s also fairly expensive, as ice cream stabilizers go.
    • Carrageenan comes from seaweed (yep, that’s right) and is another type of thickener and stabilizer. It also helps keep milk from separating into water and solids.
    • Xanthan gum comes from glucose or sucrose that’s been fermented with a bacteria, and is then processed into a white powder and used as a thickener and stabilizer. It’s another relatively expensive stabilizer that’s not as widely used in ice cream.
    • Polysorbate 80 is derived from sorbitol, which comes from glucose, or corn sugar. It’s an emulsifier used in ice cream to provide a smooth texture and to help prevent melting.
    • Mono- and diglycerides come from vegetable fats such as soy bean, canola, and palm oils, and are another type of emulsifier.
    • Gelatin, which is found in homemade ice cream recipes more often than the ingredients above, comes from animal collagen.  I think that’s enough said on that topic.  ;-)  Moving on…
  • I've also wondered whether Xanthan gum and guar gum are bulletproof?  How about acacia gum?


     


    (I'm thinking that xanthan may be a corn derivative and because of that it might not be BP)




  •  


    For a second there I thought the vitamin C could be acting as a stabilizer... but it's not on the list of ice cream stabilizers I found:


    http://www.icecreamgeek.com/?p=664


     


    BTW are any of these BP?


    • Guar gum comes from guar beans, which are mainly grown in India. The beans are processed into a white powder and used as an emulsifier and as a thickener that’s eight times as powerful as cornstarch.
    • Locust bean gum comes from the seeds of the Carob tree, which anyone unfortunate enough to be allergic to chocolate will be familiar with, because carob is often used as a chocolate substitute (ehh, sort of, anyway).  It also has a nicer-sounding name: carob bean gum. The white powder is used as a thickener, stabilizer, emulsifier, and gelling agent. It’s also fairly expensive, as ice cream stabilizers go.
    • Carrageenan comes from seaweed (yep, that’s right) and is another type of thickener and stabilizer. It also helps keep milk from separating into water and solids.
    • Xanthan gum comes from glucose or sucrose that’s been fermented with a bacteria, and is then processed into a white powder and used as a thickener and stabilizer. It’s another relatively expensive stabilizer that’s not as widely used in ice cream.
    • Polysorbate 80 is derived from sorbitol, which comes from glucose, or corn sugar. It’s an emulsifier used in ice cream to provide a smooth texture and to help prevent melting.
    • Mono- and diglycerides come from vegetable fats such as soy bean, canola, and palm oils, and are another type of emulsifier.
    • Gelatin, which is found in homemade ice cream recipes more often than the ingredients above, comes from animal collagen.  I think that’s enough said on that topic.  :wink:  Moving on…

     




     


    Non-GMO Soy lecithin, I believe, is bulletproof and can be used as a stabilizer in Ice Cream .. tried it myself and it definitely made a difference from the first batch I made without it.. Creaminess!!


     


    and don't let the "Soy" scare you .. i'm sure there are forum members that can explain it better than me but i'll give it a shot:  the lecithin is derived from soy and doesn't contain the harmful soy proteins (or something like that)


     


    If you still don't like that it is soy you can use sunflower lecithin

  • Non-GMO Soy lecithin, ay? I think I'll try it. Sounds fun.


     


    I put in a TBSP of Vodka now and then...  not very BP, but it also makes the ice cream more creamy.


  • You could also use the Upgraded Whey or Collagen as stabilizers if you wanted. Dunno on ratios though. I imagine trying 1tbl to start.


    Just getting started in BP and would love feedback - myfitnesspal profile
  • Anyone know about using rock salt in cream makers?  I just bought one to make this ice cream and it calls for rock salt.


  • yep, thats what i use, you can find it in most (maybe all?) grocery stores. sometimes its also called ice cream salt. just make sure it doesn't find its way into the ice cream.


  • deeperdeeper
    edited November 2013

    Carageenan is some nasty shit 


     


    Mono- and diglycerides -     pretty self explanatory. Got poly unsat. written all over it. 


     


    The best ice cream you can buy is Haggen Dazs. I stick to coffee. Fewer ingredients.


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     




     


    For a second there I thought the vitamin C could be acting as a stabilizer... but it's not on the list of ice cream stabilizers I found:


    http://www.icecreamgeek.com/?p=664


     


    BTW are any of these BP?


    • Guar gum comes from guar beans, which are mainly grown in India. The beans are processed into a white powder and used as an emulsifier and as a thickener that’s eight times as powerful as cornstarch.
    • Locust bean gum comes from the seeds of the Carob tree, which anyone unfortunate enough to be allergic to chocolate will be familiar with, because carob is often used as a chocolate substitute (ehh, sort of, anyway).  It also has a nicer-sounding name: carob bean gum. The white powder is used as a thickener, stabilizer, emulsifier, and gelling agent. It’s also fairly expensive, as ice cream stabilizers go.
    • Carrageenan comes from seaweed (yep, that’s right) and is another type of thickener and stabilizer. It also helps keep milk from separating into water and solids.
    • Xanthan gum comes from glucose or sucrose that’s been fermented with a bacteria, and is then processed into a white powder and used as a thickener and stabilizer. It’s another relatively expensive stabilizer that’s not as widely used in ice cream.
    • Polysorbate 80 is derived from sorbitol, which comes from glucose, or corn sugar. It’s an emulsifier used in ice cream to provide a smooth texture and to help prevent melting.
    • Mono- and diglycerides come from vegetable fats such as soy bean, canola, and palm oils, and are another type of emulsifier.
    • Gelatin, which is found in homemade ice cream recipes more often than the ingredients above, comes from animal collagen.  I think that’s enough said on that topic.  :wink:  Moving on…

     




     


     


     


     




    Non-GMO Soy lecithin, I believe, is bulletproof and can be used as a stabilizer in Ice Cream .. tried it myself and it definitely made a difference from the first batch I made without it.. Creaminess!!


     


    and don't let the "Soy" scare you .. i'm sure there are forum members that can explain it better than me but i'll give it a shot:  the lecithin is derived from soy and doesn't contain the harmful soy proteins (or something like that)


     


    If you still don't like that it is soy you can use sunflower lecithin



  • QBob,


     


    Did you not use salt with your ice maker?


  • Carrageenan is a polysaccharide that eats holes in your gut.  There isn't anything closer chemically to plastic.  It is like a phantom and can move right through cell walls, even ending up in your bloodstream.   Dangerous stuff. 


  • just drops temp 


     


    http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/why-there-salt-ice-cream


     


     




    QBob,


     


    Did you not use salt with your ice maker?



  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    Oh shit, thanks for the info about carrageenan. Here there is no cream without it... so I guess that means no more cream.


    :sad:


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

Sign In or Register to comment.