Consolidated Cooking Methods And Daily Meals

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Comments

  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful


    I took a Coursera on molecular gastronomy over the summer and have a few comments about food flavor:


     


    (1) Vegetables in oil vs. water: Some flavor compounds are oil-soluble, and some are water-soluble. The ones in asparagus are oil-soluble, so cooking it on low heat in ghee or another stable fat will bring out the flavor as the oils in the asparagus mingle with the oil.


     


    (2) I know that throwing uncooked shrimp in a plain brine (1 tsp salt to 1 cup water) for 15 minutes will make its meat plumper if it is cooked in boiling water from the Coursera I took. It was one of our homework assignments. It stands to reason that this is something that might be common to meats. How about brining the meat in water, or at least mixing it with a reasonable amount of salt, before cooking it? It probably wouldn't hurt, and if it helps ... hey. :)


     


    Dave has mentioned on his podcasts a few times that molecular gastronomists have diverged from biohackers in that the molecular gastronomists pursue the peaks of flavor over the peaks of health, to put it kindly. I still think that there is a lot to learn from scientific cooking techniques. I saw Nathan Myhrvold give a talk in Boston back in February, and it was mind-blowing.




     


     


    Exactly! I love my molecular gastronomy. Heston Blumenthal is my favourite cook. I learnt so much from reading his book. 


     


    My asparagus only gets cooked in butter. Do it on low and it's still fine. 


     


    Would you recommend that coursera course?

    No sorcery, just science. 



  • Exactly! I love my molecular gastronomy. Heston Blumenthal is my favourite cook. I learnt so much from reading his book. 


     


    My asparagus only gets cooked in butter. Do it on low and it's still fine. 


     


    Would you recommend that coursera course?




     


    Yes. It's really good. They will ask you to do some non-BP things occasionally (usually involving testing sweetness), which I did -- but the bread assignment went way too far, so I didn't do that one.


     


     




    You don't need the water, ground beef on 3 with a lid dry, steaks on 3 with a lid and butter.




     


    My gas stove from the 1970s* has a "low" setting and a "high" setting, and the low setting will boil water. Adding water to the pan helps prevent browning.


     


    * One of the burners is also broken. The joys of renting.

    -- Kaye

  • Samir aka JudoSamir aka Judo The Grass-Fed Beast
    edited January 2014


    Samir - Your Sweet Potato recipe isn't Bulletproof. 375 for 50 mins.... 350 is BP green zone max.


     


    A recommendation that Jason gave to me - Peeling sweet potatoes, cutting them into smaller chunks. Boiling them for ~5-15'ish mins (or until your spoon goes through them easily), then blending them up with some butter (and a bit of water). Makes it easy to portion out, and great for smoothies / shaker cup.




     


    Thank you for the recommendation that Jason gave you for boiling the sweet potato, I added it to the list! Remember though, BP is on a sliding scale!  So Yes, boiling it is much better but to have the mindset that something is "not bp" could cause some mental blocks for yourself in the future.. Trust me I have experience with that lol.


    Be your own best friend instead of your own worst enemy. You are the only person who will always truly be there for you.
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