College Education/career Path Suggestions For A Biohacker?

My background:

My passion has always been working out, and I have always been obsessed with taking supplements to optimize my reults (I have always been the go to guy for help whenever my friends wanted to know about bodybuilding supplements).

I am one of those people that are good at everything, but great at nothing. I have to many interests and not many passions. My passion has, since 7th grade, been exercising. I injured myself in late 2009 at the age of 16, (severly torn labrum), and I do not have health insurance, nor money to see me healed. My shoulder has prevented me from exercising, from golfing, playign volleyball, weight lifting, crossift (my favorite), you name it. Not being able to workout had caused me to fall into a severe deppresion for the past couple years. I had saved for about 3 years for the 12,000 dollar surgery and had it performed in May 2013, but it was a really long and painful recovery... In fact, I found out last month by getting a second opinion, that the surgery indeed fixed my tear, but did not adress my severly stretched out and loose labrum and that I wont be able to excercise until I get a surgery to tighten my labrum. I probably wouldn't even have full range of motion or normal use of my arm right now if it weren't for me using large doses of a healing peptide called Thymosin Beta 4 or "TB 500" last year (this is my first time telling people about it, as I feel people wouldn't judge me for it here.)


I have been now Paleo for a couple months, trying to lose weight I had packed on from not working out since I was 16 (I am now 19). I heard about Dave's coffee on the Joe rogan Experience Podcasts and I thought, wow, that Dave Asprey guy seems smart, I'll give his coffee a try and add Bulletproof IM fasting to my Paleo diet (lifestyle). I have been drinking the coffee for about 2 months and have loved it..... this led to to trust Dave Asprey. And when I found out that I need another surgery, and wont be able to ever workout until after I recover from that, I thought to myself  "Okay, I still cant workout. But I HAVE to do somehthing, I have to find a become fit again, and feel better, and be happier.". Thats when Bulletproof changed my life.

The Now:


 


I went on the bulletproofexec.com and started reading, and reading, and reading..... I probably have around 150 hours worth of reading posts by dave Asprey under my belt now. I am hooked! When I was a child, I wanted to be a scientist, when I was 13, I wanted to be a gentic engineer, I have always been obsessed with improving things through sciecne. Then I realized that math and science wasn't for me, and that a career in it would not make me happy. My shoulder, coupled with 2 years of poverty, led to me growing up very fast. I became determined with improving myself, and develoed my motto: "Never Stop Moving", it means to never stop progressing, or moving forward, in every apsect of your life:your relationships,your discipline,your education, your body, etc. I ask myself at the end of everyday if I had done anything to move forward in an aspect of my life, and if I say no, I know to work harder the next day (or stop being a bum).

I have been struggling for the past year, I am going into my second year of college, and I do not know what I want to be or what I want to do with my life. I have no hobbies or interests, other than hanging out with friends, working out ( I cant though), and my love for food (I am a foodie). Then I realized by reading Dave Asprey, and trying out what I can... has become my one of my biggest hobby and interest. I had never heard of bio-hacking until I started reading posts from Dave Asprey, but is perfectly aligned with "Never Stop Moving".  And now, looking back, being a biohacker is very similar to what I actually aspired to be when I was a child, and I have even been doing it since I was 13, by hacking my workouts and exercise progress by using supplements, and I even hacked my shoulder into halfway healing.

The Question:


So now, my question to you all is: What can I do NOW, in college, to set myself up with a career in biohacking. I do not want to be the next big biohacker, or anything like that. In fact, I hardly see me coming up with new or innovative methods. Rather, I would just like to be able to fully understand biohacking, perform it to improve myself, and be able to help other. I would like to know everything Dave Asprey or Tim Ferris does, there's only so much they can actually teach us (I still have a lot more to read, and a lot more books to buy though).


 I do not enjoy math or science, nor am I particulary good at it, but I am very fascinated in the endocrine system and learning about our hormones and how to manipulate them (that is the basis of biohacking, right?).I am currently on path to get my undergrad in Bussiness Administration at FSU, as I would LOVE to own my own successful bussiness. Im thinking of doing that, while learning everything I can from Dave Asprey, Time Ferris, Jack Kruse, etc. Then MAYBE? going back and taking pre-med and then go to medical school to get a doctorates in endocrinolgy, then maybe opening up a biohacking utopia center. A place with an upgraded resteraunt, upgraded cafe, upgraded food delivery, blood tests and consultations, seminars, upgraded foods and a co-op, and most improtantly-- all the lastest bio-hacking technologies available for sale or lease.


My point is, I am not exactly sure what I want to do. I know I would enjoy doing this for a proffession. And I know that no one can know what would make me happy. But my question is: Have any of you thought about somehow making this into a career too? Do any of you have any suggestions for college classes or potential career paths?


Thank You.


Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!

Comments

  • edited July 2013

    I'm currently completing my B.Sc in Information Technology because I've always been interested in IT and computers, although I still do not know specifically what kind of career I want. I'm focusing more on the data security / penetration testing side of IT simply because there is a great demand for it here in South Africa and it isn't necessarily a job that requires my full 100% attention in a typical 9-5 work setting. Many jobs in IT give you quite a lot of lenience, letting you concentrate your productivity and then earning yourself quite a lot of free time for the remainder of the day. To me that is ideal because then I can dabble and research and plot and plan and learn in that spare time.


     


    I'm also very business orientated and help run a local health and fitness community/business on the side in my free time, and use it to fuel my motivation for improving myself, staying healthy, biohacking, etc.


     


    I can see how your thoughts of doing pre-med etc would be very useful for this kind of thing.


     


    I don't really have any recommendations for a specific career path in becoming a biohacker, because I only dabble in it for self-interest. But with that said, my thoughts are:


     


    1) Get experience under your belt. Broaden your biohacking exploration into as many different methods and devices as you can. Use them on yourself, experience first-hand results, make sure to build connections and find other people with similar interests that you can network with.


     


    2) Make sure you have something to show for your biohacking progress. Set up a blog or website where you document what you are doing. What biohack are you specifically working on that week? Have you added anything new recently, and if so what's the progress so far or at least what are your expectations? Have you stopped a certain type of biohack recently, and if so why? Gives others some insight into your thought process and use your experiments to teach others. This will help garner you a bit of a following and some respect, and it will immediately open more doors up for you in future biohacking employment opportunities and professional connections.


     


    Especially when it comes to biohacking, having certifications to your name doesn't mean all that much. Just look at Dave Asprey for a good example, sure he is qualified and certified to some extent, but his success as a biohacker comes from actually DOING stuff and having success/failure/effort to show for it.


     


    Also remember, there is no speed limit on learning. Don't wait for a college degree to come along and teach you what you think you need to know. Identify what you want to know and start learning. 


  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress
    There's a quote in the four hour body which a Dr tells Tim he can do far more outside the system than inside it.

    I'd agree with that. So many laws, tenure and grants, reputation etc will be hard to deal with if you're doing weird and wacky things as a medical professional or something.


    But!


    Follow your passion!


    I studied business because my thinking was that I can apply it to anything that takes my fancy. Dave wouldn't have a successful blog if he didn't have business skills, and well, just look at Tim Ferriss.
  • Dave RaelDave Rael
    edited July 2013

    i have incomplete information, so i could be completely wrong, but it does not sound to me like college is aligned with the path you desire.  if you want to start a business, the best time to do that for you is now.  a college degree isn't going to mean anything in that realm and while there is a lot to learn in college, there are a lot of other places to learn as much or more.  reading tim ferriss and and listening to pat flynn's podcast and reading his material (smartpassiveincome.com) will teach you a lot more that is applicable to your goals than college will ever even approach.


     


    i'm assuming at 19 you are unmarried and childless, meaning you don't have a lot of requirements for income and some very small employment will take care of your immediate needs, leaving lots of time to think about and work toward your long term goals.  college probably gets in the way of that more than helping.


     


    the value of college is grotesquely overstated and the price of college is incredibly out of touch with the value it delivers.  i don't think it's worth it for most people.  i went to college and didn't have to pay anything in tuition because it was covered by scholarship.  looking back on it, there was a lot i learned in college and i have fond memories and there was value to my life experience.  i'm not sure, though, it was worth the 4 years and all the time i put into it.  even without paying tuition, i'm not sure it was worth it.  add racking up hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt (or throwing away massive savings or working your ass off to pay in real time) to that equation, and i think avoiding college is a no-brainer in most cases.  i'm not saying it's definitely your best move to get out of college, but i'm saying you should consider it.  in the case of geek gone strong, being close to finished, it's probably worth finishing.  not because of the sunk cost of what is already invested, but because the cost of finishing is less than the cost of completion for someone in their first or second year.  still, i think young people should think long and hard about whether their current course is really the best use of their time and other resources in moving them forward toward their desired future.


     


    i currently work as an employee and have ambitions of starting businesses, but that is difficult while having to support a family of 5 and wanting to give what time i have outside my job to my family.  if i could go back to being your age and single and free of obligations, i'd be working toward building a future, rather than learning things that may or may not apply to my future.  asking someone at the age range of 18-20 to pick something they want to do for the rest of their lives and making enormous investment in both time and money is asking too much, in my opinion.  i think you should try things and see if you like them, educate yourself instead of outsourcing your education to overpriced institutions with overly inflated senses of self-worth and with attitudes that they are doing you favors by taking your money.  we live in a youtube world where education is available for free in your home and the price of formal education keeps going up and up.  i'd argue that there are now much better ways of learning than attending college complete with interaction with the producers of material and everything.


     


    it used to be that when i would interview people for software development positions, i'd look at a degree as a plus, almost a must.  not anymore.  i don't care if you've been to college if you want to get into my organization and i see no correlation between a degree and being a better developer.


  • lostfalcolostfalco
    edited July 2013

    These are just my humble opinions, so please take them as such. =)


     


    How To Become The Greatest Biohacker In The World


    1. Become a biomedical engineer (preferably a computational biomedical engineer). http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/biomedical-engineers.htm  Computational Biomedical Engineer http://www.bme.utexas.edu/research/research-areas/computational-biomedical-engineering


    2. Master 3d Printing. http://www.amazon.com/Printing-Technology-Distributed-Manufacturing-ebook/dp/B00B1UKZC6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1374251243&sr=8-1&keywords=3d+printing   AND/OR   http://www.amazon.com/Fabricated-The-New-World-Printing/dp/1118350634/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1374251243&sr=8-2&keywords=3d+printing


    3. Take as many nutrition and chemistry electives as you can (especially biomolecular chemistry). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomolecule


    4. Learn propositional logic and combinatorics. Propositional Logic http://www.amazon.com/Concise-Introduction-Logic-Book-Only/dp/0840034164/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374251788&sr=1-1      Combinatorics http://www.amazon.com/Course-Combinatorics-J-van-Lint/dp/0521006015/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374252057&sr=1-1&keywords=combinatorics   Optional: Study for the LSAT (even though you're not going to take it) and use your scores to measure the efficacy of your brain hacks. cambridgelsat.com/ (it wouldn't let me post it as a link, but this the BEST place to get LSAT practice questions)


    5. Extensively study and practice social skills, style, and humor, especially humor. http://www.amazon.com/Comedy-Bible-Stand-up-Sitcom---Ultimate/dp/0743201256/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374252566&sr=1-3&keywords=comedy Watch every episode of The Colbert Report and 30 Rock and watch massive amounts of stand up comedy including Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock, Jimmy Carr, Demetri Martin, Steven Wright, and Mitch Hedberg. Study their 'principles' and create your own style of humor.  


    6. Use this juggernaut of a skill set to help the poor and needy, enhance your own healthy brain as well as the healthy/unhealthy brains of others, and change the world for the better! 


    7. Plan on incremently finishing these steps by your 25th-28th birthday, and you will be a star. We need as many people like this as we can get.  


     


    Note: I know you said that you don't like math and science that much, but try to if you can. 


    Note 2: Biomedical Engineering is 100% worth the money you pay for a university degree, imo. You'll never have to worry about a job again, given the skills you acquire and the massive need. 


    Check out my new site on Revolutionary Cognitive Enhancement! http://www.lostfalco.com/

     

     

  • Wow, I am truly grateful for all of your replies and I feel bad that I haven't replied any sooner. I am currently working 4pm-1am at a Deli until school starts, its really screwed up my circadian clock, and made time much harder to manage. I mostly just work, try to sleep, and eventually sleep. lol. I will though, try to repsond to each of you.


    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!

  • edited July 2013


    I'm currently completing my B.Sc in Information Technology because I've always been interested in IT and computers, although I still do not know specifically what kind of career I want. I'm focusing more on the data security / penetration testing side of IT simply because there is a great demand for it here in South Africa and it isn't necessarily a job that requires my full 100% attention in a typical 9-5 work setting. Many jobs in IT give you quite a lot of lenience, letting you concentrate your productivity and then earning yourself quite a lot of free time for the remainder of the day. To me that is ideal because then I can dabble and research and plot and plan and learn in that spare time.


     


    I'm also very business orientated and help run a local health and fitness community/business on the side in my free time, and use it to fuel my motivation for improving myself, staying healthy, biohacking, etc.


     


    I can see how your thoughts of doing pre-med etc would be very useful for this kind of thing.


     


    I don't really have any recommendations for a specific career path in becoming a biohacker, because I only dabble in it for self-interest. But with that said, my thoughts are:


     


    1) Get experience under your belt. Broaden your biohacking exploration into as many different methods and devices as you can. Use them on yourself, experience first-hand results, make sure to build connections and find other people with similar interests that you can network with.


     


    2) Make sure you have something to show for your biohacking progress. Set up a blog or website where you document what you are doing. What biohack are you specifically working on that week? Have you added anything new recently, and if so what's the progress so far or at least what are your expectations? Have you stopped a certain type of biohack recently, and if so why? Gives others some insight into your thought process and use your experiments to teach others. This will help garner you a bit of a following and some respect, and it will immediately open more doors up for you in future biohacking employment opportunities and professional connections.


     


    Especially when it comes to biohacking, having certifications to your name doesn't mean all that much. Just look at Dave Asprey for a good example, sure he is qualified and certified to some extent, but his success as a biohacker comes from actually DOING stuff and having success/failure/effort to show for it.


     


    Also remember, there is no speed limit on learning. Don't wait for a college degree to come along and teach you what you think you need to know. Identify what you want to know and start learning. 




     


    Your reply was escpecially helpful and appreciated. As I am currently struggling to find out exactly what I want to do with my life, I can not excactly drop everything and focus on biohacking alone. I do not have that much faith in myself as of this point. Though, it is a HUGE interest of mine, and will deffinately continue to be so for the rest of my life. I am seriously thinking about taking you up on your suggestion in numbers 1 & 2. Even though, I am positive I am one of the least educated membrs of this forum, in terms of biohacking, and anything I say for a few years will be elementary and most likely just knowledge I've gathered from Dave Asprey, Tim Ferris, Jack Kruse, Robb Wolf, etc.


     


    I do know that people who know me personally may take the information more seriously coming from someone they know and might benefit from it.

    A blog would also be a huge (and a fun) motivitation and a great outlet for me to expand upon biohacking as a more serious hobby that may or may not eventually blossum into a career. As of right now, I think I may keep doing exactly what I am doing, and make steps towards launching a blog by the end of this year if not sooner--as my hobby.


    What better of a hobby can one ask for than one of advance self improvement? NONE! :)


     


    THANK YOU


    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!



  • There's a quote in the four hour body which a Dr tells Tim he can do far more outside the system than inside it.

    I'd agree with that. So many laws, tenure and grants, reputation etc will be hard to deal with if you're doing weird and wacky things as a medical professional or something.


    But!


    Follow your passion!


    I studied business because my thinking was that I can apply it to anything that takes my fancy. Dave wouldn't have a successful blog if he didn't have business skills, and well, just look at Tim Ferriss.




     You have brought two very valid points to my attention, and I thank you for that. Going through med school would may only be beneficial because of the a sense of legitimacy it brings.....Every doctor should be a biohacker.... or AT LEAST every doctor should tell the patient what they can do in order to fix or prevent something instead of prescribing medicine for something that can be fixed. I would like to do that.


     


    But going through all the trouble just to be ridiculed  and not taken seriously would be horrible, it may be better for us to educate or change the people of the world, and let the doctors follow instead of fix the doctors and hope the people follow.


     


    I do know that Dave has an MBA too which makes me feel a little good about my current major, I do not know too much about Tim Ferris yet though, since I just started my bio-hacking education this summer. I am currently foccusing on learning about the science behind the Paleo diet from Robb Wolf, and how to upgrade it from Dave Asprey.... and pretty much everything else Dave Asprey says. All of Time Ferriss's books are on this years reading list as a start!

    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!

  • Your post is too long.


  • edited July 2013


    Your post is too long




     


    I appreciate you taking the time to add your  input. I was trying to make sure to provide what I thought to be adequate information on my background, interest, and about  my question to make sure people had a good understanding in order to answer it. I did separate parts into sections so no one had to read everything if they didn't want to, and even underlined the basic question, so you could have only read one sentence. However, one member told me my information was "incomplete", I will make sure to complete my future posts, while simultaneously shortening them. :)


    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!



  • There's a quote in the four hour body which a Dr tells Tim he can do far more outside the system than inside it.

    I'd agree with that. So many laws, tenure and grants, reputation etc will be hard to deal with if you're doing weird and wacky things as a medical professional or something.


    But!


    Follow your passion!


    I studied business because my thinking was that I can apply it to anything that takes my fancy. Dave wouldn't have a successful blog if he didn't have business skills, and well, just look at Tim Ferriss.




     


     


    I didn't consider this, but I do agree. It would suck to spend years and thousands of dollars to get important credentials to establish a strong sense of validity,  only to be mocked by my peers and labeled an idiot or heretic. I would love to own my own business. I am currently studying business because it seems to be one of the subjects am naturally good at. I am not gifted in math, nor sciences, or history, basically anything that has to be taught/memorized/ and applied. 


    Logic based subjects I do really well in, such as economics and political classes, because I can have a great understanding of them simply from observing, instead of having to force memorize formulas and data.


    Your comment has helped me feel more secure about my current major, as I am still 19 and struggling to figure out want I want to do in this life.... its a question that truly haunts me. 

    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!



  • i have incomplete information, so i could be completely wrong, but it does not sound to me like college is aligned with the path you desire.  if you want to start a business, the best time to do that for you is now.  a college degree isn't going to mean anything in that realm and while there is a lot to learn in college, there are a lot of other places to learn as much or more.  reading tim ferriss and and listening to pat flynn's podcast and reading his material (smartpassiveincome.com) will teach you a lot more that is applicable to your goals than college will ever even approach.


     


    i'm assuming at 19 you are unmarried and childless, meaning you don't have a lot of requirements for income and some very small employment will take care of your immediate needs, leaving lots of time to think about and work toward your long term goals.  college probably gets in the way of that more than helping.


     


    the value of college is grotesquely overstated and the price of college is incredibly out of touch with the value it delivers.  i don't think it's worth it for most people.  i went to college and didn't have to pay anything in tuition because it was covered by scholarship.  looking back on it, there was a lot i learned in college and i have fond memories and there was value to my life experience.  i'm not sure, though, it was worth the 4 years and all the time i put into it.  even without paying tuition, i'm not sure it was worth it.  add racking up hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt (or throwing away massive savings or working your ass off to pay in real time) to that equation, and i think avoiding college is a no-brainer in most cases.  i'm not saying it's definitely your best move to get out of college, but i'm saying you should consider it.  in the case of geek gone strong, being close to finished, it's probably worth finishing.  not because of the sunk cost of what is already invested, but because the cost of finishing is less than the cost of completion for someone in their first or second year.  still, i think young people should think long and hard about whether their current course is really the best use of their time and other resources in moving them forward toward their desired future.


     


    i currently work as an employee and have ambitions of starting businesses, but that is difficult while having to support a family of 5 and wanting to give what time i have outside my job to my family.  if i could go back to being your age and single and free of obligations, i'd be working toward building a future, rather than learning things that may or may not apply to my future.  asking someone at the age range of 18-20 to pick something they want to do for the rest of their lives and making enormous investment in both time and money is asking too much, in my opinion.  i think you should try things and see if you like them, educate yourself instead of outsourcing your education to overpriced institutions with overly inflated senses of self-worth and with attitudes that they are doing you favors by taking your money.  we live in a youtube world where education is available for free in your home and the price of formal education keeps going up and up.  i'd argue that there are now much better ways of learning than attending college complete with interaction with the producers of material and everything.


     


    it used to be that when i would interview people for software development positions, i'd look at a degree as a plus, almost a must.  not anymore.  i don't care if you've been to college if you want to get into my organization and i see no correlation between a degree and being a better developer.




     


    I appreciate your comment. You are right....and I think about this often. Only my understanding of biohacking is at a beginner status right now, and I am wary of making any rash decisions on it. I actually love college, I went to 5 high schools in 3 states, and even had to drop out for 2 semesters, and my gpa suffered, I only got a 3.3, so I am currently at community college (tallahassee community college, about 20,000 students attend) with a 75% scholarship, and grants cover the rest, even leaving me with spending money. I am really enjoying proving to myself that I can be a great student, I just got accepted into my college's honors program, and honors society. I am going to transfer to Florida State University down the street.


    Until I know for-sure what I want to do or how, outside of college, I am going to take advantage of all this free knowledge... mostly because I really enjoy it, the teachers, the classes, the students, my crappy student apartment with 3 roommates, all of it.

    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!



  • These are just my humble opinions, so please take them as such. =)


     


    How To Become The Greatest Biohacker In The World


    1. Become a biomedical engineer (preferably a computational biomedical engineer). http://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/biomedical-engineers.htm  Computational Biomedical Engineer http://www.bme.utexas.edu/research/research-areas/computational-biomedical-engineering


    2. Master 3d Printing. http://www.amazon.com/Printing-Technology-Distributed-Manufacturing-ebook/dp/B00B1UKZC6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1374251243&sr=8-1&keywords=3d+printing   AND/OR   http://www.amazon.com/Fabricated-The-New-World-Printing/dp/1118350634/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1374251243&sr=8-2&keywords=3d+printing


    3. Take as many nutrition and chemistry electives as you can (especially biomolecular chemistry). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomolecule


    4. Learn propositional logic and combinatorics. Propositional Logic http://www.amazon.com/Concise-Introduction-Logic-Book-Only/dp/0840034164/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374251788&sr=1-1      Combinatorics http://www.amazon.com/Course-Combinatorics-J-van-Lint/dp/0521006015/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374252057&sr=1-1&keywords=combinatorics   Optional: Study for the LSAT (even though you're not going to take it) and use your scores to measure the efficacy of your brain hacks. cambridgelsat.com/ (it wouldn't let me post it as a link, but this the BEST place to get LSAT practice questions)


    5. Extensively study and practice social skills, style, and humor, especially humor. http://www.amazon.com/Comedy-Bible-Stand-up-Sitcom---Ultimate/dp/0743201256/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374252566&sr=1-3&keywords=comedy Watch every episode of The Colbert Report and 30 Rock and watch massive amounts of stand up comedy including Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock, Jimmy Carr, Demetri Martin, Steven Wright, and Mitch Hedberg. Study their 'principles' and create your own style of humor.  


    6. Use this juggernaut of a skill set to help the poor and needy, enhance your own healthy brain as well as the healthy/unhealthy brains of others, and change the world for the better! 


    7. Plan on incremently finishing these steps by your 25th-28th birthday, and you will be a star. We need as many people like this as we can get.  


     


    Note: I know you said that you don't like math and science that much, but try to if you can. 


    Note 2: Biomedical Engineering is 100% worth the money you pay for a university degree, imo. You'll never have to worry about a job again, given the skills you acquire and the massive need. 




     


    Lostfalco, I appreciate your input very much, especially all the links. I agree that formula you have devised would definitely create one of the world's greatest biohackers. However, I do think those goals are out of my potential. I will however definitely do number 5, I will try to learn number 4, consider number 3, my goal in life to accomplish number 6, and I will meet with someone to learn more about biomedical engineering and if it is for me.


    I have been fascinated with bio-engineering since I was a kid (the gecko tape, the goats that produce silk, myostatin humans-dogs-cows-rats, glow in the dark pigs), and now we are creating human hearts, and 3d printing miniature livers etc. I love the outcome of bio-engineering, I just don't think I would be very great at creating it.

    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!

  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress


    I didn't consider this, but I do agree. It would suck to spend years and thousands of dollars to get important credentials to establish a strong sense of validity,  only to be mocked by my peers and labeled an idiot or heretic. I would love to own my own business. I am currently studying business because it seems to be one of the subjects am naturally good at. I am not gifted in math, nor sciences, or history, basically anything that has to be taught/memorized/ and applied. 


    Logic based subjects I do really well in, such as economics and political classes, because I can have a great understanding of them simply from observing, instead of having to force memorize formulas and data.


    Your comment has helped me feel more secure about my current major, as I am still 19 and struggling to figure out want I want to do in this life.... its a question that truly haunts me. 




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    Happy to hear it, mate!


     


    A few more things to consider: one of my friends did a Bachelor of Arts majoring in European History and Politics. Now he works as a metals trader. The point? You don't necessarily have to work in the exact field your degree is in. A business degree is more widely usable than say a Neuroscience degree. At the end of the business degree, you can always study further if you want to.


     


    Another point I like was on podcast #38 with SEALFIT's Mark Devine.


    He said something along the lines of: you can spend 4 years trying to figure out which degree you want to do, or you can spend 4 years doing a degree while you figure out which degree you want to do. At the end of 4 years, in the first scenario you have nothing and are still figuring things out. The second scenario, you have a degree and are still trying to figure things out. Which one is better?


    I have the quote totally wrong but that's my take on what he said. It inspired me to start Judo, because I want to continue doing Taekwondo with my daughter when she is old enough (she's 1 now). I want to go through the grades together. 


    So I could wait for 5-6 years until she can do it, then start, while just waste my time waiting until then. Or I thought I would probably be able to get my black belt in Judo by that time. So I joined up!


     


    Hope that makes some kind of sense ;-)



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    Happy to hear it, mate!


     


    A few more things to consider: one of my friends did a Bachelor of Arts majoring in European History and Politics. Now he works as a metals trader. The point? You don't necessarily have to work in the exact field your degree is in. A business degree is more widely usable than say a Neuroscience degree. At the end of the business degree, you can always study further if you want to.


     


    Another point I like was on podcast #38 with SEALFIT's Mark Devine.


    He said something along the lines of: you can spend 4 years trying to figure out which degree you want to do, or you can spend 4 years doing a degree while you figure out which degree you want to do. At the end of 4 years, in the first scenario you have nothing and are still figuring things out. The second scenario, you have a degree and are still trying to figure things out. Which one is better?


    I have the quote totally wrong but that's my take on what he said. It inspired me to start Judo, because I want to continue doing Taekwondo with my daughter when she is old enough (she's 1 now). I want to go through the grades together. 


    So I could wait for 5-6 years until she can do it, then start, while just waste my time waiting until then. Or I thought I would probably be able to get my black belt in Judo by that time. So I joined up!


     


    Hope that makes some kind of sense :wink:


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    It makes perfect sense! And again, you have also calmed my anxiety about my degree even more!  Thank you!


     


    On another note:


    I trained MMA for several years as a young teenager before i injured my shoulder, and though I never trained Judo, I HIGHLY suggest No-Gi jiu-jitsu. And of the various jiu-jitsu schools, I HIGHLY suggest the 10th Planet System. Its all about technique, and from their its a chess game. Highly addicting :), I do not know where you are located, but I would deffinately give it a try. If you are a Joe Rogan fan, he is also a 10th planet black belt, and his buddy; Eddie Bravo is the creator of this new and innovative system, its mostly innovative because Eddie Bravo is a stoner (in a good way).



    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!

  • What do you guys know of "Functional Medicine"? Would this be a plausible career path? I looked into it, and it sounds right down our alley, but are mocked as being "quacks"


    Never Stop Moving: Progress in some aspect of your life everyday, move forward in it, whether it be your job, school, body, mind, or relationships. Constantly better yourself!

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