Why Did Migraines Start On The Diet?

A friend of mine who started doing the diet in December noticed that she started getting regular migraines a few months after starting the diet, whereas she'd never had migraines before (she's 33 yrs. old, though they do run in her family).  She now has migraines after virtually every meal.  When she went back to eating badly (gluten, etc.) during one week, the migraines went away.  I know this is contrary to the usual experience of people on the diet (since usually migraines and other neurological symptoms can get better on a more ketogenic diet).  Could it be toxins that have accumulated over the years being released?  If so, any sense of when this might subside?  Is there anything anyone would recommend she do additionally to try to address the problem?


Comments

  • RodRod The Rodfather
    edited October 2013

    Yes, it's the toxins, well a greater chance. The food can cause an opiate effect so it's like a withdrawal. She needs to focus on detox to help her cope. We don't know the amount of toxin load, how good she dotoxes, etc...


    Everything I learned about "biohacking" has been baby steps to "circadian biology", that's where the real biohacking comes in. You can buy a bunch of cool shit to "hack" but if you don't have context, you're not winning. Paleo is just a brand now and too many have opinions, it's on you to read and reread the material to not only find truth but to connect the dots. Much love to everyone who has helped me on my journey for restoring my health, please keep in touch. Feel free to message me with health questions [email protected] 

  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    I agree with Rod. Do you know if she's doing anything to handle the detoxing? Activated charcoal, etc?


  • She takes activated charcoal on days when she eats things that aren't great and when she has particularly bad headaches.  She also occasionally takes bentonite clay.


  • RodRod The Rodfather


    She takes activated charcoal on days when she eats things that aren't great and when she has particularly bad headaches.  She also occasionally takes bentonite clay.




     


    Can you get me a list of what she eats and has the head aches and then doesn't? I'd like to take a look at the food. 

    Everything I learned about "biohacking" has been baby steps to "circadian biology", that's where the real biohacking comes in. You can buy a bunch of cool shit to "hack" but if you don't have context, you're not winning. Paleo is just a brand now and too many have opinions, it's on you to read and reread the material to not only find truth but to connect the dots. Much love to everyone who has helped me on my journey for restoring my health, please keep in touch. Feel free to message me with health questions [email protected] 

  • edited October 2013


    Can you get me a list of what she eats and has the head aches and then doesn't? I'd like to take a look at the food. 




     




    If I had a complete list of what she eats when she has headaches or doesn't, I'd know the likely source of the problem.  We've been trying to track it, but there's no clear pattern thus far.  (She's been using the Food Sense app.)  She generally tries to stick to the diet, but we live in NYC and eat out at least a few times a week, so it's not perfect by any stretch.  Also, we don't avoid dairy, she sometimes has sugar and more rarely a bit of gluten.  I'd say she has legumes (in small quantities) once or twice a month.  She avoids vegetable oils when not eating out. 


     


    Once, there was a migraine that was clearly the result of drinking a tiny bit of the free coffee at Trader Joe's.  (I had a bit of the coffee too and could tell it wasn't good, though I didn't have any adverse reaction because I don't have the same sensitivity.)  The migraine started about five minutes after she drank it (she'd had nothing else to eat around that time) and progressively got worse.  Because caffeine is known to be a migraine trigger and a hormone disrupter, she's tried to avoid it, but that hasn't seemed to help ... and when she's had good coffee, there hasn't been any bad effect.  I've never seen an effect from tea.  There are other times when I've been decently sure dairy was the cause, but she doesn't always get it in response to dairy, so I'm not sure what to think about that.  I know aged cheese is sometimes more dangerous for migraines due to the presence of tyramines, and once, I was sure some burrata was the cause, but at other times, she's had the exact same burrata without anything happening.  Sugar actually seems to help sometimes (maybe there's a low blood sugar thing going on?), and I know she sometimes has a strong need to eat immediately so there are probably sugar-related fluctuations going on.  Activated charcoal DEFINITELY helps.  When she's strayed from the diet and eaten gluten at various times, e.g., chocolate croissants, she's never gotten headaches from it.  Yesterday, we ate some Sri Lankan food at a restaurant (can't tell you everything that was in it; one dish had eggplant, plantains, chilis, beef and rice cooked in a banana leaf, one dish was the Sri Lankan spin on lamb curry, but I have no idea what was in it, since the flavor was pretty different from the Indian variety, and another dish contained I-don't-know-what), and she had a very mild headache afterwards, but perhaps we'd simply warded off a worse headache with activated charcoal immediately.  


  • The trouble I have had on Bulletproof is that it pushes my serotonin levels down even lower. As a migraineur I have lower than average levels to begin with and then following this diet can push them lower. It was trying to get a handle on the migraines that contributed to my significant weight gain after an accident, as the foods that reduce the likelihood of a migraine or reduce the symptoms, are also those that caused me to gain weight. All that I know is that if I follow Asprey's diet according to what he has set out, my migraine frequency spikes.


  • J-rockJ-rock
    edited March 2016


    The trouble I have had on Bulletproof is that it pushes my serotonin levels down even lower.




     


    Have you tried SAMe, tryptophan, or 5-HTP? Be careful if you are taking anti-depressants though.  Also, a B complex, Vitamin D3, magnesium, zinc, and DHA/EPA can help increase serotonin. Have you thought you may have gut issues and tried probiotics?


  • I take B2, D3, Magnesium, Taurine and Butterbur each day, which have reduced the frequency of the migraines. I am experimenting with Theanine right now to see about using it to raise my serotonin levels. I eat a fair amount of kimchee and sauerkraut, so my gut culture should be pretty good.


  • J-rockJ-rock
    edited March 2016


    I take B2, D3, Magnesium, Taurine and Butterbur each day, which have reduced the frequency of the migraines. I am experimenting with Theanine right now to see about using it to raise my serotonin levels. I eat a fair amount of kimchee and sauerkraut, so my gut culture should be pretty good.




     


    Try taking a basic B complex instead of just Riboflavin. Life Extension makes a good one that I am taking. Are you taking the l-theanine when drinking BPC? If so, mixing stimulants with depressants can trigger headaches. Even coffee alone can trigger headaches for some. Are you getting enough sodium and potassium in addition to magnesium? What form of magnesium are you taking?


     


    Changing the lighting in your home and decreasing time spent watching tv and being on the computer will help as well.


Sign In or Register to comment.