Cortisol

The BP Diet has helped me to really tune in to my body. I have been having a pretty stressful week at work and am realizing that my body is stressed out too. I have found it to be more difficult to focus, and I am antsy and constantly moving. 


 


Any ideas for ridding my body of this excess cortisol so I can work well under the pressure? Thanks in advance for your responses.


"Most women in our culture, then, are disordered when it comes to issues of self-worth, self-entitlement, self-nourishment, and comfort with their own bodies; eating disorders, far from being ‘bizarre’ and anomalous, are utterly continuous with a dominant element of the experience of being female in this culture."— Susan Bordo 

 

Comments

  • edited January 2014

    I'd recommend exercise and sleep as the cheapest fixes. 


     


    emWave is also great. Mine is broken right now but all you really need to do is take 5 seconds to breath in and 5 seconds to breath out and focus on your heart. Having the realtime feedback the emWave gives is very good because know you're doing it right (and when you get distracted) but you'll almost certainly get the same benefits from looking at a stopwatch and just doing the breathing bit. Try that for 5 minutes before sleep and see if it helps :)


  • Stress comes from a fear that many times is not real and our body goes into a fight or flight mode. It is made into bigger problems in our own heads. How we mentally deal with stress causes all sorts of issues and there is no magic pill for that one. So treating the symtoms is not always the way to go, but get to the root cause which requires a change of thinking in stressful situations. This is where I struggle, but am getting better.


     


    For me sleep and exercise is the only thing that removes cortisol. If I am in a state of stress... too late. For me the key is avoiding that whole situation and there is no suppliment I can take once I am in that stressed state.


     


    When I have exercise and sleep, good suppliments can improve my mood. I take Vitamin B Complex, Vitamin C and L-Tyrosine plus several others.


     


    Using the emwave2 over the course of my day seems to help as I am more cognizant of my +/- thinking and it helps me breath through the situation or at least recognize the situation and realize I am getting stressed.


     


    HTH


  • GarrettGarrett
    edited January 2014

    http://chicagofloatationtanks.com/


     


    Floatation Tank. An amazing source of stress relief :) And you have a float centre in Chicago! 2, actually! Space Time (the link I gave) is one of America's longest running float centres. 


     


    A nice quote from Graham Talley, one of the owners of FloatOn, in Portland


    "Your spine decompresses, your muscles relax like you've gotten a massage, and your brain starts releasing extra dopamine and all these other feel good neurotransmitters; it’s like taking a bath in outer space."


  • Awesome. These are actually a reasonable price too. I have looked into places charging 2 or 3 times this much. 


     




    http://chicagofloatationtanks.com/


     


    Floatation Tank. An amazing source of stress relief :) And you have a float centre in Chicago! 2, actually! Space Time (the link I gave) is one of America's longest running float centres. 


     


    A nice quote from Graham Talley, one of the owners of FloatOn, in Portland


    "Your spine decompresses, your muscles relax like you've gotten a massage, and your brain starts releasing extra dopamine and all these other feel good neurotransmitters; it’s like taking a bath in outer space."



    "Most women in our culture, then, are disordered when it comes to issues of self-worth, self-entitlement, self-nourishment, and comfort with their own bodies; eating disorders, far from being ‘bizarre’ and anomalous, are utterly continuous with a dominant element of the experience of being female in this culture."— Susan Bordo 

     

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    The breathing helped me a lot too, with some meditation (not far enough yet, I should do much more!). It quickly became a second nature to do the "box breathing" whenever I want to relax, or whenever I feel a stressor coming.


    Until about a year ago I used to get those rushes of anger with the desire to punch someone in the face very often (like 10-20 times a day at least), and also fear or uneasiness (living with the feeling that something is always going on in the background and as soon as I turn my back someone will stab me in the back, and spinning around all the time to avoid this and sleeping with one eye open is quite a stressor). Now the same situations that made that feeling of stress raise in my body hardly evoke any reaction, I experience a calm instead more and more often. The breathing and the little meditation already helped a LOT.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • Try your absolute hardest to control your breathing and your heartbeat. If you don't know what I'm talking about when I say this, holler back.


     


    Supplements I'd recommend would be:


    Phosphatidylserine   Dave is a huge fan of this


    Theanine  to at least help you relax what your cortisiol levels are elevated


    5-HTP to help support serotonin production and mood


    L-Tryptophan to help support serotonin production and mood


    check out this brand --> https://www.onnit.com/new-mood/


    Coconut charcoal You might need to remove toxins 


     


    Also


    Try eating a ton of fiber. Chia seeds and Psyllium are my favorites for removing toxins. The fact that they both form a gel when mixed with water make them incredible at flushing toxins.


    ~ The Universe goes inward just as much as it goes outward ~

     

  • Is there any good research on what exercise is best at reducing/releasing cortisol?


  • GarrettGarrett
    edited January 2014

    Pizzabagel - yoga. Yoga. Yoga. Yoga. Yoga yoga yoga yoga yoga yoga yoga. Yoga.


     


    Have you seen the people who do yoga frequently? They're some of the most chill and relaxed people a person knows... stress just namaste's away from them.


  • I guess yoga is an obvious answer.  I consider myself to be pretty chill but my stomach and bloodwork suggests otherwise. :D 


     




    Pizzabagel - yoga. Yoga. Yoga. Yoga. Yoga yoga yoga yoga yoga yoga yoga. Yoga.


     


    Have you seen the people who do yoga frequently? They're some of the most chill and relaxed people a person knows... stress just namaste's away from them.



  • Has anyone used a flotation tank as their full-time bed?


  • Have you seen the people who do yoga frequently? They're some of the most chill and relaxed people a person knows...


     


    This doesn't mean that there is a causal relationship. Like most people I know that start with yoga are already relaxed. 


     


    That said I wouldn't be surprised if it helped at all.


  • GarrettGarrett
    edited January 2014

    Stinko: I've done extended floats on numerous occasions. My longest is single float is 6 hours, so far (I've done a bunch of 6 hour floats, which are usually broken up in the middle by getting out for bathroom breaks), and I've floated quite a lot :)


    Floating is wonderful to do for some overnight/longer floats... and super rejuvenating. I have found that it's nice to have a balance between both the float tank, and a physical bed. Sometimes I feel like floating overnight, sometimes it's so nice to have the physicality of an actual bed. 


     


    I'd recommend getting a float tank, have it properly set up, then do overnight floats. Or speak to your local Float Centre about doing some overnight floats in their tanks.


    Don't get rid of your bed, though. Test to see how you feel by doing overnight floats on a consistent basis. Your body will tell you (in very clear ways) what it wants, and if it wants bed sleep, or float tank REST  :) It might end up that it'll gravitate exclusively to the float tank for overnight sleep/work, though we do generally say that floating isn't a replacement for sleeping - it is, however, an excellent addition to one's sleep / REST regiment.


     


    ~~~~~~~~


     


    Actually, there is a causal relationship. A lot of the moves are designed to release stress and strain in the body, which brings about significant amounts of relaxation. As well as presence through deep breathing



    There is a science in Yoga. I'd recommend doing deeper research into it :)


     


    I've known a LOT of wound-up people who have started doing yoga, who have then noticed that their stress levels drop through asanas and meditation, which brings about a state of relaxation.




    Have you seen the people who do yoga frequently? They're some of the most chill and relaxed people a person knows...


     


    This doesn't mean that there is a causal relationship. Like most people I know that start with yoga are already relaxed. 


     


    That said I wouldn't be surprised if it helped at all.



     


  • Sweet!


     


    Never done it before, so I'll definitely have to give it a try! There's one here in my city!


  • Garrett - I'm in a walking boot from breaking my ankle a couple of days ago.  Is there a yoga class for me?


  • GarrettGarrett
    edited January 2014
    Awesome! It's a lot of fun. I recommend doing it at least 3 times, since your first float (or 2) will be mostly getting used to the environment, and each float builds on the last :)


     




    Sweet!


     


    Never done it before, so I'll definitely have to give it a try! There's one here in my city!



     



     


    ~~~~~~~


     


    I'd recommend calling one of your local yoga studios, explain what's happening with your foot, and see what advice they give you :)


     




    Garrett - I'm in a walking boot from breaking my ankle a couple of days ago.  Is there a yoga class for me?



  • Tapping/EFT is simple and effective

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