After Low Calories

RekaReka ✭✭✭
edited February 2014 in The Bulletproof Diet

After one follows a low calorie diet, how much time is needed to get back to "normal"? The amount of food people suggest to eat here is just terrifying. Not because I couldn't eat it but because I always had to watch out very carefully not to gain.


 


 


After being fat most of my life, I lost the fat with the bodybuilding method (high protein, low everything else, lots of weights and cardio). I got lean on a 1000-1100 kcal diet with lots of exercise, and had the best time of my life. Lost nearly 60 pounds in 1.5 years, kept it off without problems for three years.


Enter high fat diets two years ago, I removed toxins, added fat and started eating around 1500 kcal. I gained almost 15 pounds, and I don't like this. Perhaps only half of it is fat because I gained strength too, and don't look much larger, but I still don't need to gain any.


 


 


I see two ways: either higher fat (and calorie) doesn't help me stay lean / get lean again and I have to get back to a lower intake and switch between low calorie and high fat, depending on how much I gain during high fat periods. Though I'm no fan of the low energy and cold sensitivity that comes with it.


The other way is that perhaps my body should adapt to eating more and start burning more. I still don't see this happening. How much time does it take? Does it ever happen? Most of the time I see the suggestion "you should eat more", but this obviously didn't work for me. I'm far from being perfectly BP but I live much healthier than I used to so I doubt that it is due to toxins. I used to consume much more toxins yet lost fat like crazy. :)


 


I see many benefits of this lifestyle but fat burning is not one of them. I don't want to lose those benefits but I want to see that 15 pounds gone again. :) I give the cyclic keto approach one more week and after that let a month of reduced fat intake come (let's say 40% protein, 30%-30% carb and fat). I will keep track of it and hopefully will be able to lose the extra and get some balance. Of course I will still eat as BP foods as I can.


 


 


If anyone has some advice on how to proceed after huge calorie deficits (which was the only thing that worked for me), it will be appreciated. :)


 


 


I want to understand what that factor is that made me lose fat and keep it off on a high stress, higher toxin lifestyle with not nearly as many supplements (for example, no D at all, and I haven't even heard of K), and it makes me gain fat on a healthy lifestyle. This just doesn't make sense to me right now (haven't made sense for the last year or so).


It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

 

Is your social worker in that horse?

 

Success has a price, not a secret.

Tagged:

Comments

  • I seriously wish I had that answer! My story is similar, except that I am a lifelong yoyo dieter. I've never been obese, but I found myself at a high point (in a bad way) after finishing grad school in '05. So in '06 I lost all my grad school weight plus 20 more by eating 1000 calories per day and limited exercise (that was then). I kept it off eating low calorie, high carb, high crap food until last year when it became clear my lifestyle wasn't sustainable (thyroid, ovaries crashing; no energy). I put on 10 lbs last year for a number of reasons.


    I too am finding it hard to take those pounds off. My metabolism seems to be bouncing back slowly. The best I can tell you is to work multiple angles because there is no one magic bullet to take you back in time to when your body did work.


    Here are my thoughts:


    1. Build more muscle (no explanation needed). Won't fix everything but you might get a little more calorie burn.


    2. Work on resetting your leptin. We've both been on Jack Kruse's website. I think his leptin reset plan might give us both some mileage.


    3. If you are actively trying to lose weight, cycle your calories (low most days, but 200-400 calories higher once or twice/week) to prevent your metabolism from tanking again.


    4. Try cold thermogenesis to see if that'll increase calorie burn. I'm more fearful than skeptical -- I don't like the cold :(


    5. Get really awesome sleep as much as possible.


    6. Be patient with your body.


    And if you find additional "secrets", let me know !


    Mary

    Mary

  • Hi these videos break down exactly what you're asking about:-.


     


    How to recover from low cal diets:



     


    Expansion on metabolic damage:



     


    He was a guest on Dave's podcast this Octobre I believe


     


    glhf


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    Thanks, Mary! I really need to read that leptin reset. :)


    As for building muscle, I'm already built like a wrestler :D Around 160 lbs now, and around 25% body fat. When I got very lean I was around 145 and around 22%.


     


    I made some modifications in my plan for the upcoming weeks. Been tracking everything religiously for the last four weeks since I started Jason's athlete protocol. Now that I checked that thread out again I found I could get stricter with my intake and the cycling as well.


     


    Good luck with the cold! :-D I've been getting some exposure, haven't seen any fat loss from it but at least I don't hate it anymore, it makes me feel free and powerful.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    Solving this will help me a lot to understand things better.

    One thing is, I haven't damaged myself by that low calorie diet, the damage had been done much earlier, probably earlier than I could remember. That bodybuilding approach helped a lot to fix it and it was just what I needed. I consider this new gain a temporary price of hacking done not smart enough, just like the ice burn. (though that was gone very fast. :D )



    In terms of the bucket metaphor (see here: http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/4597-why-calories-in-vs-calories-out-is-wrong/ ) my bucket has always been dysfunctional. My body would naturally just eat tons, and would have been happy by laying in bed all day, it refused to even produce heat. So there was nothing to damage when I started working out and doing a BB type diet. Now, after losing that fat then spending two years experimenting with the hacker approach, the bucket is still not perfectly healed but in a much better shape. :) Thermogenesis jumpstarted, and whenever I don't train for a few weeks I notice myself walking around more so my body wants a higher energy output, which is a very good sign, compared to how lazy it used to be.



    One thing important: I didn't do a crash or yo-yo diet, I did a BB style cutting diet very carefully and taking my time, I was pretty strong when I started and got much stronger in the process.



    Based on the video, the best next step is to tweak my intake to a bit lower fat type for the following weeks, go back to around 1100 kcal (please don't get terrified) and then slowly raise it because right now this 1500ish is too much for me. I'm not too good at maintaining a steady intake or input, I rather vary it doing the week so I will give this time. I started this tweaking 4-5 weeks ago, based on Jason's great athlete plan, I began with the minimal recommendation then raised it because I was getting more tired, looks like I raised it too much, I will post my results there in a few weeks.

    Waiting for MCT, should arrive in a week, it will make it easier.



    When someone gets difficulties, this is where hacking gets really exciting. :)


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    So, an update: Mary, you were right. I didn't think I could gain muscle because I was pretty muscular and strong to begin with, but based on the changes in my training performance (strength and stamina increased a lot and boosted through plateaus), and what I see in the mirror and my clothes: probably half of the weight I gained is muscle / lean. I didn't really need it, but it's still a good thing.


    I switched my macros to 45-50% fat and 25-30 of both protein and carbs, but varying a lot from day to day, went back to train a bit more, and now I lost some of the fat, still not where I want to be but closer. I don't have a scale at home so I go based on mirror and clothes, but I can weigh myself in a couple weeks. Should have cut alcohol completely, but I only started to cut it now (drank only a little but that could get in the way, too).


    Getting stronger is always good but I don't want to end up looking like a Hell Knight from Doom 3, I prefer the Imp physique.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • ZenfoodZenfood ɹǝqɯǝɯ pǝɔuɐʌp∀
    edited April 2014

    Deadlift, squat, bench press, overhead press and do chin-ups. This will not make you "huge" or "too big". Thinking that is just hubris.

    It will make you an efficient fat burner. More than cardio. My body fat is 7.5% and I mainly do these exercises 2-3 times a week and I never do cardio and I don't count my calories.

    I just eat shitloads of carbs post-workout and low to moderate fat.


    On rest days I eat shitloads of healthy fats ;)


    And I used to be the guy that gained weight (extra fat) easily... never been fit, but this is me today.
    http://oi59.tinypic.com/pxc29.jpg


    Please note that change take times. Not weeks, but months to years. You want to stick to something that works for you for the rest of your life.

    You have to go high protein each day as well.


    Being sedentary and losing weight is quite impossible even if you eat perfectly. This means that you have to be on a caloric deficiency if you want to lose weight.

    You should exercise and if you're exercising for any reason (be it looking good or just healthy) just start doing heavy compound movements (the ones I listed) or something you actually enjoy purely with your heart and cannot get tired of (for me it used to be Krav Maga, but I got sick of being in pain all the time for several years).


    Let me quote Martin Berkhan:

    "Just because you’re female, doesn’t mean you should train like a bitch. A bitch is a bitch. Gender got nothing to do with it." :)


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited April 2014

    Yeah those you listed are my favourites, and I made a definite progress in these in the past 1-2 months. It was a huge relief to see that I gained strength and muscle, too, not just unnecessary fat.


    Motivating photo!


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • ZenfoodZenfood ɹǝqɯǝɯ pǝɔuɐʌp∀
    edited April 2014

    Then I believe that you are on the right path! Just stop worrying (it raises cortisol and makes you fat! :D) and trust that all is well. Continue with what you are doing and look back in two months.


     


    I would recommend fasted walking in the morning (45-60 min, pulse 120-130) with only coffee/tea and 10g of BCAA in order to lose extra fat faster!


    Best of luck to you, Reka!


  • I wouldnt get so hung up on the scale, easier said than done I know. Just focus on how you look and how you feel. You can try to continue to eat at maintenance while you weight train and maybe incorporate some HIIT a couple of times a week.


    I found that following a routine for a few weeks really helped me get myself in check and helped me chart my progress and tweak my diet accordingly.



    Also that layne norton vid is pretty good, he has a few others that are similar that you might find useful. Good luck!
  • you made me peaceful and inspired reading your struggle


     


    im mostly still on aerobic exercise, hoping to get rid of some fat and then start with cardio


     


    i would advise something thats been told me when i start to change my life


    - avoid preservatives, additives and processed foods 


     


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭


    you made me peaceful and inspired reading your struggle


     


    im mostly still on aerobic exercise, hoping to get rid of some fat and then start with cardio


     


    i would advise something thats been told me when i start to change my life


    - avoid preservatives, additives and processed foods 




     


     


     


    Try the exercises suggested by Zenfood above, they are way better than aerobic (not trying to make you stop aerobic if you like it but if you don't, no reason to do it)

    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited June 2014

    Guess an update is timely: in the last month I've been feeling much tighter and less puffy. Looks like I'm only 8 pounds heavier than in my leanest shape, and I suspect that half of it can be muscle, so that's sweet. After the full time work plus exams insanity ended I went back to more training two weeks ago. I began swimming twice a week this year because it's fun, do heavy lifting once a week, and the Randy Couture barbell complex once a week (six cycles of it is pretty tough).


     


    Very happy because today, after a 23-hours fast, I broke my record in chinups. I used to do four in a row, and now I did six!!! (It's the girlie type chinups, I have to put my feet down between them, but it doesn't change the fact that it's a huge improvement).


    Will post some photos as soon as I manage to synchronize my phone and newly installed Windows 7 (reinstalled a month ago but still too busy to fix everything on it).


     


    So, things are looking good.


     


    Big takeaway message: Whatever you do to your body has an effect, sometimes it is very hard to find out what works and what causes what effect, but we are actors, and in control. It's not just "doing everything but no results" (I used to be that person, too, until about six years ago). Whatever we do has some results, but sometimes it's a freaking huge work to find out how to proceed. But yeah, we have control.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

Sign In or Register to comment.