Hydrated Sodium Calcium Aluminosilicate (Hscas) (Aflatoxin Binder)

I keep coming across references to Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) in literature on mycotoxin detox, but only in animals. I can't find any mention of its use in humans, nor any supplement for humans. 


 





 


"7.5.1.1. Aflatoxins-adsorbingagents



Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS)


Results of studies indicate good correlation between the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS). They show that HSCASclay can adsorb AFB1 with high affinity and high capacity in aqueous solutions (including milk) and in the meantime it can markedly reduce the bioavailability of aflatoxins in poultry; it can greatly diminish the effects of aflatoxins in young animals, i.e., rats, chicks, turkey poults, ducklings, lambs, and pigs; and it can decrease the level of AFM1 in milk from lactating cows and goats."

http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/scdocs/doc/22e.pdf (p. 127)






 


It looks like Azomite clay might be what I'm looking for:


http://www.amazon.com/Lbs-Azomite-Additive-Fertilizer-Minerals/dp/B000E7MTT4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1394148084&sr=8-2&keywords=azomite


 


"Azomite (pronounced ā-zō-mite, officially all-caps AZOMITE) is the registered trademark for a complex silica ore (hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate) with an elevated ratio of trace minerals unique to the Utah mineral deposit from which it is mined."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azomite


 


From Weston A Price:


"Azomite Mineral Powder: This powdery mineral supplement, containing montmorillonite clay and many other compounds, comes from an ancient seabed. It is an excellent source of silica, calcium, magnesium and the gamut of trace minerals. Clay also has detoxifying effects as the negatively charged clay particles attract positively charged pathogens and take them out of the body. Technically sold as an anticaking compound and available only in 40-pound bags, Azomite is incredibly cheap when used as a mineral supplement, costing less than one dollar per pound delivered. Take a heaping teaspoon mixed with water daily as an insurance of adequate macro- and trace mineral ingestion in these days of soil depletion through intensive farming."


http://www.westonaprice.org/basics/guide-to-superfoods


 




 


Any experience or comment?


Comments

  • Great, thanks


  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭



     


    Chlorella would work wonders. Good source of chlorophyll and binds with heavy metals and dioxins.

    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

    I also offer coaching:  http://fixyourgut.com/health-coaching-information/

     

    Please join or like the Fix your Gut Facebook. Also please add me on twitter @FixYourGutJB.

     

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  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭


    I keep coming across references to Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) in literature on mycotoxin detox, but only in animals. I can't find any mention of its use in humans, nor any supplement for humans. 


     






     


    It looks like Azomite clay might be what I'm looking for:


    http://www.amazon.com/Lbs-Azomite-Additive-Fertilizer-Minerals/dp/B000E7MTT4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1394148084&sr=8-2&keywords=azomite


     


    "Azomite (pronounced ā-zō-mite, officially all-caps AZOMITE) is the registered trademark for a complex silica ore (hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate) with an elevated ratio of trace minerals unique to the Utah mineral deposit from which it is mined."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azomite


     


    From Weston A Price:


    "Azomite Mineral Powder: This powdery mineral supplement, containing montmorillonite clay and many other compounds, comes from an ancient seabed. It is an excellent source of silica, calcium, magnesium and the gamut of trace minerals. Clay also has detoxifying effects as the negatively charged clay particles attract positively charged pathogens and take them out of the body. Technically sold as an anticaking compound and available only in 40-pound bags, Azomite is incredibly cheap when used as a mineral supplement, costing less than one dollar per pound delivered. Take a heaping teaspoon mixed with water daily as an insurance of adequate macro- and trace mineral ingestion in these days of soil depletion through intensive farming."


    http://www.westonaprice.org/basics/guide-to-superfoods


     




     


    Any experience or comment?




    Aluminum? Its the bad part of the compound. Silica is okay though.

    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

    I also offer coaching:  http://fixyourgut.com/health-coaching-information/

     

    Please join or like the Fix your Gut Facebook. Also please add me on twitter @FixYourGutJB.

     

    http://www.fixyourgut.com

     

  • MilaMila
    edited March 2018

    Hydrated aluminosilicate minerals ARE zeolites — the key ingredient in almost every detox formula. My Grandfather, Rollin J. Anderson, discovered AZOMITE in the 40s and ate it with every breakfast of his very long life, as does his son, my Uncle, who is 91 and still acts like a 35 year old. It was instrumental in helping me recover from mold poisoning — a gift from Hurricane Sandy and a bad NYC landlord who is now serving time at Rikers. There are various livestock studies on immunity — a byproduct of detoxification support — their international (read not U.S.) website. I don't take it daily, but alternate pulsing it with rounds of cholestyramine or DE, depending on what I've been exposed to. It isn't marketed for human consumption because the huge rigmarole involved isn't yet a priority with current focus on livestock feed and soil amendment use. Outside of its detox potential, I prefer to get my minerals though plants that have been grown with AZOMITE, rather than take it directly. It makes more sense to me.

    Aluminum is not the 'bad part of the compound'. AZOMITE does not contain 'aluminum', per se, because the 'alumina' in AZOMITE is not biologically available. It is bound to the silica as an "aluminosilicate". Sand, clay, most rock deposits, and soil deposits are primarily aluminosilicates. In the words of Sally Fallon, President of the Weston Price foundation, "It does contain aluminum, but it is also rich in silica, which counteracts the aluminum. People have been eating clay and dirt as a tradition for thousands of years and all clay contains aluminum and silica."

    A great resource for learning more about AZOMITE (and Rudolf Steiner's biodynamic agriculture) is a book called Secrets of the Soil, by Christopher Bird and Peter Tompkins, which has devoted Chapter 17: Savory Soil to my Grandfather and his acronym for the "A to Z of Minerals Including Trace Elements".

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