Maybe, You Should Gain Weight

http://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/03/06/maybe-you-should-gain-weight/?singlepage=true


 


For all of the 140 and 150 pound guys lurking around here... you know who you are.


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Comments

  • Feeling it. I'm not in that 150'ish lb range, but I have been working on putting on more muscle. It just feels right to do so, as a dude. 


    Great article.


  • NoogisNoogis
    edited March 2014
    I have been looking into this lately. The problem is affording the food. I'm thinking decent cheaper whey protein might not be as bad as cheaper meats. I'm sure upping my omega 6s via cheap meats wouldn't be optimal.

    My weight started to plummet when I was doing weekly carb reloads. I have had to add reloads every evening.

    Haha my goal is to get UP to 150, but I'm only 5'7
  • yep, thats me. that's why i'm doing BBS...i've been seeing lots strength increase in my legs but not as much in my arms. i kind of wonder if a 3-days a week protocol instead of the 1 day a week thing i've been doing would help, or if i should just stay the course with BBS.... at least they agree with the small amount of reps though. 


  • I haven't done BBS. Doing P90X3 right now. But it's generally best to stay the course with the protocol that's set out (for workout programs), rather than adding a bunch of extra, which might just add undue stress to your body, and thus offset any potential gains that you might get.


     


    So probably stay the course. See what comes up at the end of it.




    yep, thats me. that's why i'm doing BBS...i've been seeing lots strength increase in my legs but not as much in my arms. i kind of wonder if a 3-days a week protocol instead of the 1 day a week thing i've been doing would help, or if i should just stay the course with BBS.... at least they agree with the small amount of reps though. 



  • SystemSystem mod
    edited March 2014

    Aren't you the same dude who said High School Diploma > College Degree?


     


    LMAO! I can't take anything you say seriously, sport. The dump I took this morning has more credibility than you.




  • I haven't done BBS. Doing P90X3 right now. But it's generally best to stay the course with the protocol that's set out (for workout programs), rather than adding a bunch of extra, which might just add undue stress to your body, and thus offset any potential gains that you might get.


     


    So probably stay the course. See what comes up at the end of it.




     




    yeah i'm gonna stick with it for at least a while longer with this particular protocol (except might try the double dose protocol this week because next week i have a weekend training intensive). the weird thing is that i've been adding weight each week with the leg press, and if there is anything that ISN'T getting adequate rest between BBS workouts its my legs - capoeira and yoga has me working my legs all the time, and my legs do seem to have a constant slight soreness lately. but for some reason my arms, which i'd say get a lot more rest (aside from handstands and other arm balances) seem to be gaining strength much slower, and are only sore for a day or two after my workout. maybe just because my legs have more strength to begin with? or maybe because these machines lack the cam profile that would help me fatigue them more deeply? 




    Aren't you the same dude who said High School Diploma > College Degree?


     


    LMAO! I can't take anything you say seriously, sport. The dump I took this morning has more credibility than you do.






     


    who are you talkin about? are you suggesting the article posted isn't credible or garrett's comment?



  • I have been looking into this lately. The problem is affording the food. I'm thinking decent cheaper whey protein might not be as bad as cheaper meats. I'm sure upping my omega 6s via cheap meats wouldn't be optimal.

    My weight started to plummet when I was doing weekly carb reloads. I have had to add reloads every evening.

    Haha my goal is to get UP to 150, but I'm only 5'7




     


    Eggs... Find some high quality eggs and eat a dozen a day. Maybe $4 max, full of good protein and fat.

  • SystemSystem mod
    edited March 2014

    I'm talking about the OP.


     


    He's still mad about what happened in the "What's your height and weight" thread I started about a month ago. 


     


    The poor guy probably lost sleep over it.






    yeah i'm gonna stick with it for at least a while longer with this particular protocol (except might try the double dose protocol this week because next week i have a weekend training intensive). the weird thing is that i've been adding weight each week with the leg press, and if there is anything that ISN'T getting adequate rest between BBS workouts its my legs - capoeira and yoga has me working my legs all the time, and my legs do seem to have a constant slight soreness lately. but for some reason my arms, which i'd say get a lot more rest (aside from handstands and other arm balances) seem to be gaining strength much slower, and are only sore for a day or two after my workout. maybe just because my legs have more strength to begin with? or maybe because these machines lack the cam profile that would help me fatigue them more deeply? 




     


    who are you talkin about? are you suggesting the article posted isn't credible or garrett's comment?




  • drumminangoleiro,

    You're experiencing the novice effect, it will work for some time and eventually the gains will stop. Of course at the novice stage of weight lifting any sort of stimulus will work, for some time.


     


    Most likely you are not stressing your upper body enough, with volume or frequency to force adaptation. If you create a stressor and then wait too long between workouts, you will have returned to baseline by the time you train again, and no progression will be made. The goal is to create a stimulus, your muscles compensate, and at the peak you apply a more stressful stimulus, to make the progression continue.


  • yeah i dunno if i need to be 200lbs at 5'7" to be as strong as i need to be. at some point i'd think there's a tradeoff with agility and flexibility. maybe not though, as long as i continue to do things that require and develop agility and flexibility, thats kind of what i'm experimenting with. i'm all for "independence and self sufficiency" as the article suggests, but i think agility and flexibility are just as important as strength in that regard. picking up heavy stuff is valuable sure, but so is being able to catch yourself from a fall, crawl around on the ground, have a wide range of motion, and get out of the way of something quickly. 


     


    fun fact: a friend who is really into weightlifting tried to do a handstand pushup at my house the other day and did a grand total of.... one. i don't wanna be like that! 


  • SystemSystem mod
    edited March 2014

    What the hell?


     


    This is what the author wrote: "Bigger and stronger is better than being underweight for your health, your athletic performance in the vast majority of sports, and your longevity, as well as for your appearance."


     


    I read the rest of the article, hoping that the author would cite some evidence of his claim that muscular, swole people outlive their "underweight" counterpart. But he didn't. Instead, he kept writing about how to go about getting bigger. Wow. If you're going to make a claim like that, please give us some evidence.


     


    Secondly, what constitutes "underweight?" Also, how big is "big enough?" How big do I need to get to meet the author's requirement? He doesn't tell us shit.


     


    Poorly written article, at best. 1.5/10.




  • drumminangoleiro,


    You're experiencing the novice effect, it will work for some time and eventually the gains will stop. Of course at the novice stage of weight lifting any sort of stimulus will work, for some time.


     


    Most likely you are not stressing your upper body enough, with volume or frequency to force adaptation. If you create a stressor and then wait too long between workouts, you will have returned to baseline by the time you train again, and no progression will be made. The goal is to create a stimulus, your muscles compensate, and at the peak you apply a more stressful stimulus, to make the progression continue.


     




     


    so in your opinion/experience, the BBS protocol of one workout a week is just him capitalizing on the novice effect? 



  • What the hell?


     


    This is what the author wrote: "Bigger and stronger is better than being underweight for your health, your athletic performance in the vast majority of sports, and your longevity, as well as for your appearance."


     


    I read the rest of the article, hoping that the author would cite some evidence of his claim that muscular, swole people outlive their "underweight" counterpart. But he didn't. Instead, he kept writing about how to go about getting bigger. Wow. If you're going to make a claim like that, please give us some evidence.


     


    Secondly, what constitutes "underweight?" 






    yeah this came up in another thread.  i know there are old weight lifter folks out there, but i wonder how many of them there are compared to thinner-framed, lighter old folks. i think its important to differentiate between lean and strong and thin and frail. 



  • so in your opinion/experience, the BBS protocol of one workout a week is just him capitalizing on the novice effect? 




     


    Unfortunately a large percentage of workout protocols and programs/books written capitalize on that. Scientific literature does not recognize the different stages of training, novice/intermediate/advance, and therefore makes all recommendations based off of the novice, which literally respond to anything. P90X, Insanity, most crossfit programming. etc. etc..


     


    If you take an untrained person and put them on a leg curl machine, and have them do 10 leg curls at 75 lbs, maybe you have one group do it twice a week, and one group do it once a week. Then at the conclusion of the study after 8 weeks the findings are that the group doing it once a week had almost the same results as the group doing it twice a week, in regards to muscle hypertrophy therefore everyone should do leg curls, at 75 lbs, 10 reps.. once a week for maximum gains... It completely ignores the different stages of training and yes, YOU WILL gain muscle from something like that, but how far it will actually take you, now that's a different story, and unfortunately there are not scientific studies lasting years, having people do proper training using barbells and other people doing machines with the same weight for years at a time to compare them.


     


    Unfortunately the fictitious weight training scenario I described is how most of them are designed, and using that literature people design programming, and it works exactly the same way.. Novice untrained individual will gain for a period of time...

  • SystemSystem mod
    edited March 2014

    From what I've noticed, most of the people who seem to go on forever were slender their whole lives, especially the ones living in Japan and other Southeast Asian countries.


     


    I have nothing against dudes who pump iron all day and endeavor to compensate for whatever insecurity they have in life, but don't make some stuff up to strengthen your agenda.


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