How Do You Decrease Mental Resistance To Doing Your Work?

edited October 2014 in General Discussion

My mental clarity is now much better and no longer the bottleneck in my work.


 


But now the bottleneck is that "ugh I don't want to do this " feeling after I solve a few homework problems then get to the next one, I feel like ugh this problem is going to take a while I don't want to do this. I feel a sense of maybe anxiety in my legs like I want to get up and leave my problem even if the study topic overall is pretty interesting or I somewhere in my head believe that the task is worthwhile I still want to get up and leave 


 


The other bottleneck in my work seems to be getting stuck, trying a bunch of things to fix getting stuck on a problem, and then getting distracted along the way, doing another task, and then never returning to the problem set until much later 


 


I am sort of expecting people to say "well just work harder" or "toughen up" or "focus harder" but that kind of response is somewhat lazy and in my opinion is not getting down to the core issue of why human minds resist doing the work we try to get it to do. 


 


I don't mean this as a joke. Has anyone - any psychologist or whatever, studied this academically, made names for this,  or found good techniques for dealing with these mental resistances to doing your work even if your mental clarity is good? 


 


Just the way Dave Asprey looked into how willpower is a exhaustible resource, I am wondering if any one has seriously academically studied this separate but related issue of why our brain resists doing work.


 


I think about why my brain is resisting doing homework problems at some point and I don't quite have a rational reason. My fingers, eyes, and body are rested and the topic is interesting but it looks like there is alot of work ahead at various points when my mind had previously thought I am about done with my work. Then this causes sort of a sinking feeling when I realize how much work there is ahead and then I want just to walk away. 


Comments

  • edited October 2014

    I could have summarized the entire post like this:


     


    1. What strategies do you use when you get distracted to remember to get back on task? I often forget to go back to the original task. - when the problem isn't mental clarity : it is just not having a system to deal with distraction that drag you away from your main task


     


    2. What are some concrete strategies you use to overcome your mind's resistance when your mind says "ugh I don't want to do this" to the stack of papers or problems in front of you? 


     


    I don't fully understand what it means chemically or even practically when one part of your brain is telling you to do a task and another part of your brain is resisting the task. 

  • edited October 2014

    Just a theory, but it could help. The more primitive part of your brain cannot see into the future; it wants immediate reward. Dave likes to call this the labrador in your head part of your brain; responsible for flight or fight responses. The part of your brain that developed later in the human evolution time frame can recognize the value of suffering now for a bigger pay off later. The problem is that the more primitive part of your brain is more powerful. Try something along these lines... break up your tasks into small chunks so that one of the procrastination triggers (sense of being overwhelmed) isn't set off. Reward yourself after these chunks of time spent doing work with something like playing angry birds for a minute or whatever you fancy. Make sure you don't allow yourself to get access to whatever reward you choose so that your brain only associates that reward with the completion of a chunk of work. Conditioning your brain this way will create a motivation for work that stems from the anticipation of a small reward. Eventually other motivating factors can come into play such as mastering a subject giving you a sense of progress and fulfillment. 


  • Most powerful: See responsibility as a privilege. See everything you are doing as a privilege. Look at what you gain by doing it, and what you move away from by doing it. Examine what you lose by not doing it, and what unfavorable things are more likely to happen by not doing it. Remind yourself of that and then appreciate that you are able to do it. That you can make the change in your life.


     


    Do this consistently and it works wonders.


     


    #2: Zembrin CILTEP, phenylpiracetam, oxiracetam, noopept.


     


    Experiment with them one at a time and work it out. I find that these shut down behavioral inhibitions for me. They have other cognitive boosting effects as well. You can also stack them once you understand each individually if desired.


     


    I'd do your research into them first, though. Smart drugs are powerful, but not something you want to dive into without understanding them.


    Biggest takeaway after several years as a hardcore biohacker: think long-term. Focus on health first before adding in boosters. It works a lot better.
  • War of Art, by Steven Pressfield
  • Star ChaserStar Chaser Powered by Shred
    edited October 2014
    Similar to what was mentioned above, it has been studied in evolutionary psychology. Working expends energy and your body and mind are going to do anything they can to conserve energy.


    Lucky for you your focus problem could be something as simple as a nutrient deficiency. Do you supplement with iodine?

    I am a Video Game composer under the pseudonym Star Chaser.

    twitch.tv/starchaservgm (streaming most saturday and sunday nights EST)

    Guitarist:

    https://youtu.be/8L0SkovqEf4

    Next cover is Die by the Sword by Dragonforce.

    Music/Health/Biohacking Blog and Podcast currently under construction.

    Thanks to the internet, health experts, and my unending curiosity, I have overcome: excessive sweating (adrenal fatigue), anxiety and panic attacks, extremely high estrogen levels (man boobs), chronic brain fog (yeast overgrowth), depression, and am currently battling SIBO (took it from being so bloated it felt like my stomach skin was going to rip, slept 2 hours per night for a week because of upset stomach and being chronically fatigued to very mild, manageable but still annoying symptoms) and currently battling sleep deprivation/insomnia probably due to the SIBO/Leaky Gut and resulting histamine intolerance.

  • Perhaps read the book "Eat That Frog" by Brian Tracy. Fantastic book for enhancing productivity, and gettting past blocks in one's mind.
  • 60-60-30 formula by Eben Pagan: Work for 50-59 minutes, take a short break, 50-59 minutes, and then take 30 minutes to eat a small meal and rest before working again. Fits body's ultradian cycle.


     


    "Miracle Morning" by Hal Elrod. Start day with exercise, meditation, visualizations, affirmations, etc. I like to visualize myself overcoming hurdles, and imagine the feeling of satisfaction when I accomplish my goals.


     


    I agree with the "Eat That Frog" suggestion.


  • Eat That Frog also has 2 great little tricks - The "Swiss Cheese" method, and The "Salami Slice" method. Both are fantastic - just taking little punches out of a task at a time. Just for a few minutes. Then taking a bit more out of it. Then a bit more :) Soon the task will be completed!


    The better you can get on focusing for longer time, once you get going... the better. There is definite effectiveness loss which happens if/when a person rapidly moves between tasks... :) Though when a person JUST needs to get some momentum going.... both methods are quite effective :) And more time can be allocated to it, once you get going. You may even find yourself SWEPT along into task completion!


     


    :D




  • 60-60-30 formula by Eben Pagan: Work for 50-59 minutes, take a short break, 50-59 minutes, and then take 30 minutes to eat a small meal and rest before working again. Fits body's ultradian cycle.


     


    "Miracle Morning" by Hal Elrod. Start day with exercise, meditation, visualizations, affirmations, etc. I like to visualize myself overcoming hurdles, and imagine the feeling of satisfaction when I accomplish my goals.


     


    I agree with the "Eat That Frog" suggestion.




     


    The meta-idea is solid. But to be offset based on other factors as well. If you are experiencing chest constriction and stress, going further just because you need to reach 60 minutes for your ultradian cycle ... will just return negative results compared to recovering sooner.


     


    Also, breaks are lesser required when taking many different supplements and smart drugs. E.g. my mental recovery time when using phenylpiracetam is about 30 seconds instead of 5 minutes. Similar for other things.


     


    You'll be go able to go longer and with shorter breaks the more you train your mind as well. Start with where you are at and go from there.

    Biggest takeaway after several years as a hardcore biohacker: think long-term. Focus on health first before adding in boosters. It works a lot better.
Sign In or Register to comment.