Nausea And Vomiting After Eating Eggs

I have been BP since January of this year and at some point this summer developed a sensitivity to eggs. If I eat one egg I get very nauseous anything more than one, like say, a scramble I will throw up. This has happened with pastured eggs and the $6.50 Omega-3, free-range, no hormone Trader Joe's eggs. It has even happened when eating eggs in other countries in the past 6 months. I have poked around online a bit (someone on Mark's Daily Apple was experiencing something similar), but everyone else I found with this had been eating multiple eggs every day. I have only occasionally been eating eggs (thus the 6 months to figure out what was going on). I have also considered this could be an egg allergy but I am 30 years old and that seems very late in life to develop that according to other sources I have found. Has anyone else experienced a sudden sensitivity to eggs after going BP? Didn't Dave say something about developing one after doing his Eskimo diet (not that my version of BP resembles that)? Do you think it would be worth the cost of getting an allergy test for eggs?


 


Thank you so much everyone.


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  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited November 2014

    have you tried just the yolks...? to see if the issue lies with the whites. 


     


    if not, give it a test. egg whites seem to be the most problematic part of the egg.


     


    (& all the good stuff is in the yolks)


    fake it till you make it

  • The reason Dave developed a sensitivity to eggs is that he went extremely low carb for a couple months, and stopped properly producing mucous, including the mucous lining his gut. So he gave himself leaky gut. 


     


    Have you gone excessively low carb or had some other gut permeability issue?


     


    Also, omega-3 eggs come from chickens that are fed flax and other weird stuff, they are not good quality, even if free-range. But I don't think eating omega-3 enriched eggs is the cause here. That's just a sidenote. 


  • @daz You know, now that you mention it, I would feel worse when I would eat the yolks. I would always try to eat the yolks because as you say, that is where the good stuff is. When eating hardboiled eggs at lunch I would always feel better if I didn't eat the yolk or only half the yolk. Bummer if it's the yolks with all their goodness! I kept it up because I just assumed the icky feeling was all part of the Keto flu, but the sickness has stopped since I took the hardboiled egg out of my lunches.


     


     


    @ACH85 Thanks for the tip about the Omega-3 eggs, a good reminder to always keep your guard up when dealing with "health food" marketing.


    I was (am) doing between 30 and 50 grams a day of carbs, mostly veggie/nut carbs and mostly at dinner. Then a refeed once or twice a week. So I am pretty new to all of this, but I don't think that is extremely low carb... But then again I am also aware that there is a huge difference between the way men and women respond to low-carb and I am not clear on all the details. Maybe it is too low for me, I didn't even think about leaky gut...


     


    Thanks both of you for the reply!



  • I was (am) doing between 30 and 50 grams a day of carbs, mostly veggie/nut carbs and mostly at dinner. Then a refeed once or twice a week. So I am pretty new to all of this, but I don't think that is extremely low carb... But then again I am also aware that there is a huge difference between the way men and women respond to low-carb and I am not clear on all the details. Maybe it is too low for me, I didn't even think about leaky gut...




     


    A lot of that is probably fiber (depending on the vegetables and nuts in question) and not really usable carbs, so you might be lower than you think. Activity level also matters. I believe I once crashed from low carb, and gave myself a bit of leaky gut. At the time I was actually around ~70g a day (though 20-30 was fiber) and doing refeeds/cheat days Friday night through Saturday. I was running hill sprints at least 4x a week, and doing weight lifting 2-3x a week. It went well for about 3 weeks, then I got dry eyes and sinuses, and woke up with 4 pounds of bloat and diarrhea. So low carb and mucous production issues is my assumption. 


     


    Dave recently posted this article on BP diet hacks for women. Based on that, you might look at a bigger refeed, or sticking to twice a week. Not that that would solve the immediate problem, my understanding is the way to solve food allergies is to totally eliminate the problem food until you lose the antibodies for those proteins – which could be 6 months, unfortunately. That is, of course, assuming a food allergy is the problem. 

  • The nuts I am doing are almost always macadamia nuts and the veggies vary a lot but are mostly broccoli, green beans, kale, or carrots (all steamed and covered in Kerrygold) but it is whatever the farm share brings usually. Now that I think about it this, these problems did present this summer when I was training for a race and doing combination of hill sprints and long runs 5 or more times a week. Sometimes it is so hard to get away from the "more is more" mentality...


     


    Thank you for the article! It looks like will be more sweet potatoes, carrots, and white rice for me for a while.


     


    Thanks again!


  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭
    edited November 2014

    Yeah, most of those veggies are not starchy, I think you're low. Check out Jason Miller's "Bulletproofing the Athlete" thread in the Athletic Performance forum if you are going to be training like that. He's focussed on lifting, but any intense exercise requires more carbs because it burns glycogen (stored carb energy.) Most people's fat burning capacity can't keep up with intense athletic efforts at or near max effort. 


     


    The carbs won't solve a potential egg allergy. You should eat enough starchy carbs to cover your exercise and keep your metabolism humming, which will also maintain mucous levels, and if your gut has healed, that mucous will ensure you don't have additional permeability issues. Then it's a matter of avoiding foods to which you are sensitive to for a long time. If you are sensitive to egg proteins, you will still have a reaction even if your gut lining is perfect. 


     


    If you suspect your gut lining is still compromised, l-glutamine can be used to help heal it. 


     


    Now, that said: generally these food sensitivity issues cause inflammation, bloating, etc. I have not heard of immediate vomiting. So an egg sensitivity due to compromised gut lining is still at best a working hypothesis. You might take a look at the Bulletproof Food Sense app, which is designed to help you discover more subtle sensitivities (ones that don't cause immediate vomiting.) 


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