Too Many Eggs?

Hi guys,


 


For the past 3 months I have increased my egg dosage to about 4-5 whole eggs a day, with an occasional day off or reduction in eggs (2-3 a day). I have also started to include yolks in my BPC for days where I train or I know will be fasting longer than usual. I know I've heard Dave mention he built up a food allergy from eggs when he tried going full Ketosis for several months, I'm guessing he was over consuming them, but not sure how many a day. 


 


I am curious as to what a good amount of eggs would be throughout the week as I don't want to build an intolerance to them because they really are an amazing food. I'm thinking about an egg fast/protein fast once a week, I'm sure this would help.


 


Thanks for your thoughts in advance.


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Comments

  • Dave's suspected reason for getting the allergy was reducing small intestinal mucous production by going extremely low carb for too long. This degrades the gut lining which allows undigested proteins to enter the blood stream, where white blood cells learn to view them as a threat and create an autoimmune reaction. 


     


    So, don't go too low carb for too long. 


     


    Unrelated, eating the same thing constantly can also lead to allergies. A day off or two a week is probably a good idea. 


     


    It's not really BP intermittent fasting if you are adding yolks to your BPC. 




  • It's not really BP intermittent fasting if you are adding yolks to your BPC. 




    Why not?


     


    Intermittent fasting is about not having carbs or protein until X-time... yolks = fat = does not matter if fat from butter or fat from yolk in BPC

  • i pity anyone without the ability to eat eggs. 10-15 a week for the last decade. Excellent food to throw in a glass and toss own the hatch aswel if in a hurry, I'm not sure why but I have a feeling they are simply more healthy raw, maybe all the goodness is just absorbed faster and has a quicker impact that is less sustained. 


     


    Has Dave actually explained why protein is breaking the fast yet fat does not break the fast??? What is the difference? 

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014


    Intermittent fasting is about not having carbs or protein until X-time...




     


    I would define that as BP Intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting to me...is to not eat/drink anything (water excepted) until X-time.


     




    Has Dave actually explained why protein is breaking the fast yet fat does not break the fast??? What is the difference? 




     


    The idea is that you want to stay in ketosis, so you do not want to raise insulin to a level that reduces ketosis, so safer to keep protein to an absolute minimum.


    Nearly all amino acids are glucogenic (can be converted in to glucose). 


    (only leucine and lysine are exclusively ketogenic amino acids). 


    fake it till you make it

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    I actually can't eat eggs anymore without getting nauseous. In my early paleo days, I ate them way too much, and seem to have developed a sensitivity as a result. It's a damn shame, because even growing up I adored eggs.


     


    Is there any way to hack a sensitivity to eggs? They're so damn nutritious and tasty. I'd love to eat them again.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

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  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014


    I actually can't eat eggs anymore without getting nauseous. In my early paleo days, I ate them way too much, and seem to have developed a sensitivity as a result. It's a damn shame, because even growing up I adored eggs.


     


    Is there any way to hack a sensitivity to eggs? They're so damn nutritious and tasty. I'd love to eat them again.




     


    if you have not tested this already,


    you can try just the yolks, in people with 'egg issues' the whites are usually (but not always) the problem. & all the goodness is in the yolks.


     


    & heated* yolks may be less of an issue for you than raw yolks. *you can play around with the level of heating/cooking, from just warming to fully cooked. ie. you can start by just dropping into a hot drink/soup or mix into hot food.


    fake it till you make it

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    Thanks for the input.


     


    Unfortunately, the yolks (even scrambled yolks) upset my tummy :( 


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • I've heard of people resetting their Memory Immune Cells. So, any learned threats have to be relearned.


     


    Sounds kind of dangerous, but that's really all I know about it.


    Selected threads from the BP forum (Use your own signature to highlight threads that you think are important or significant)



  • Is there any way to hack a sensitivity to eggs? They're so damn nutritious and tasty. I'd love to eat them again.




     


    Dave did an episode of the Fat Burning Man show where they talk about food sensitivities. They made it sound like if you are only moderately reactive (as defined by blood results, not bodily reaction,) you can just take a long break from eating a certain food and then see about reintroducing it. That's more a vibe from the whole conversation, not a specific statement or quote, but you can listen here if you want, the food sensitivity talk starts at 12:50. 


     


    So, you could try taking a break from all egg proteins, but keeping in mind so many SAD foods contain eggs, you'd need to basically act like a vegan outside the house. 

  • Have you tried eggs not from chickens? I.e. duck eggs, turkey eggs... the Asian markets have quail eggs, which are minuscule, if you wanted to be really cautious ;)


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014

    OFF: 




    Thanks for the input.


     


    Unfortunately, the yolks (even scrambled yolks) upset my tummy :(




     


     


    Is this why you changed your name? (Jason told you you can't have Demon in your name and use the word "tummy", I will never forget that :D :D )


     


    ON:


    In theory, taking a few months off should fix the allergy.


    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭
    edited December 2014


    Have you tried eggs not from chickens? I.e. duck eggs, turkey eggs... the Asian markets have quail eggs, which are minuscule, if you wanted to be really cautious ;)




    I haven't, actually. This is a good idea!


     




    OFF: 


     


     


    Is this why you changed your name? (Jason told you you can't have Demon in your name and use the word "tummy", I will never forget that :D :D )


     


    ON:


    In theory, taking a few months off should fix the allergy.




    Lol!


    Unfortunately, I've gone a few months between attempts, and the end result is the same. The reaction varies; sometimes I get hardcore nausea almost immediately, and other times it causes diarrhea. It's so weird. In my SAD days as a kid, I used to eat a ton of eggs. I'd make omelets with 6-8 eggs on the regular. Never had a problem with them. Then, when I went paleo, I kept on eating them as a cheap source of protein and BAM! Nausea city.


     


    Thanks for the input though, guys. I guess it has been a few months since I've eaten them. I might give them another try or seek out some non-chicken eggs.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • edited December 2014

    This is why food elimination can be dangerous. If you give yourself a tiny list of foods that aren't 'kryptonite', and rely entirely on those for your diet -- without trying to fix any underlying issues -- you're just going to end up crossing more foods off the "CAN EAT" list and at the final conclusion you'll only be able to eat fat. (This appears to be happening to my mom right now.)


     


    Dave speaks badly of it in the BP Diet book, but moderation can be a good thing.


     


    I can see a lot of people giving themselves allergies by going low-carb Paleo. They'll have few carbs, no homemade broth, not enough veggies (I think Nora Gedgaudas mentioned this on the podcast?) -- in short, their stomach lining is going to get trashed. Combine that with an undeveloped restriction diet (when you're a newbie, your menu is not varied) and you've got allergies in the making. I think Weston A. Price is probably way safer transition diet than Paleo for people coming from SAD. Paleo seems prone to mis-use.


     


    Every big new diet has a backlash phase, where too many people went in to the deep end too quickly, and we're about to enter that phase for Paleo (if we haven't already). On the plus side, we're going to learn a lot.


    Selected threads from the BP forum (Use your own signature to highlight threads that you think are important or significant)

  • Are there a lot of people who get brain fog from eggs?  I have suspected this in myself before, but I hesitate to blame the eggs.  Or maybe I'm just in denial.


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