Cold Brew Using Coconut Water

 


Coconut water is:

  • Rich in natural vitamins (especially the B vitamins), minerals, and trace elements (including zinc, selenium, iodine, sulfur, and manganese). ...
  • Full of amino acids, organic acids, enzymes, antioxidants, and phytonutrients.
  • Rich source of electrolytes and natural salts, especially potassium and magnesium.
  •  
  • Coconut water nutrition facts

  • Coconut water is actually the juice present inside the interior cavity or endosperm of young, tender coconut. Its water is one of the nature’s most refreshing drinks, consumed worldwide for its nutritious and health benefiting properties.


    The water is actually obtained by opening a tender, green, healthy, and undamaged coconut. Inside, it's clear liquid is sweet, and sterile and composed of unique chemicals such as sugars, vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, enzymes, amino acids, cytokine, and phyto-hormones. In general, young and slightly immature coconuts gathered from the coconut tree after they reach about 5-7 months of age for the purpose of reaping its drink.


          tender-coconuts.jpg


Botanically, coconut plant belongs to the Arecaceae family of palm trees, and has the scientific name: Cocos nucifera.


Each coconut may contain about 200 to 1000 ml of water depending upon cultivar type and size. Any nuts younger than five months of age tend to be bitter in taste and devoid of nutrients. In contrast, mature coconuts contain less water, and their endosperm thickens quickly into white edible meat (kernel). Coconut milk obtained from the meat, therefore, should not be confused with coconut water.


Coconut palm flourishes well under the costal tropical environments. A coconut tree may yield several hundreds of tender nuts each season. Different species of coconut palms are grown all over the tropics. Naturally, their taste and flavor of water show variations according to saline content in the soil, distance from seashore, climate, etc.


 



 


 



Health benefits of coconut water



  • Coconut water is a very refreshing drink to beat tropical summer thirst. Its liquid is packed with simple sugars, electrolytes, and minerals to replenish dehydration conditions inside the human body.



  • Research studies suggest that cytokinins (e.g., kinetin and trans-zeatin) in coconut water found to have significant anti-ageing, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-thrombotic (anti-clot formation) effects.



  • Coconut water has been generally offered to patients with diarrhea in many tropic regions to replace the fluid loss from the gastrointestinal tract and to reduce the need for hospitalisation. The osmolarity of tender coconut water is slightly greater than that of WHO recommended ORS (Oral Rehydration Therapy) solution. Presence of other biological constituents like amino acids, enzymes, minerals, and fatty acids may account for this higher osmolarity. Nonetheless, unlike WHO-ORS, its water is very low in sodium and chlorides, but rich in sugars and amino acids. This well-balanced fluid composition, along with much-needed calories, would be an ideal drink instead of any other kind of soft drink beverages available in the markets to correct dehydration conditions.



  • Coconut water is composed of many naturally occurring bioactive enzymes such as acid phosphatase, catalase, dehydrogenase, diastase, peroxidase, RNA-polymerases etc. In effect, these enzymes help in the digestion and metabolism.


  • Despite being very light in consistency, its water proportionately has better composition of minerals like calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, and zinc than some of the fruit juices like oranges. (Compare the mineral composition of oranges).

  • Its liquid is also a very good source of B-complex vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pyridoxine, and folates. These vitamins are essential in the sense that the human body requires them from external sources to replenish.



  • Coconut water carries a very good amount of electrolyte potassium. 100 ml of water has 250 mg of potassium and 105 mg of sodium. Together, these electrolytes help replenish electrolyte deficiency in the body due to diarrhea (loose stools).


  • Further, fresh coconut water has a small amount of vitamin-C (Ascorbic acid); It provides about 2.4 mg or 4% of RDA. Vitamin C is a water-soluble ant-oxidant.

 


 



I started out with the idea that the cold brew method might work better with


some probiotics or enzymes added to the water to help break down the coffee over many 


hours, and possibly produce strong and flavorful cold brew coffee. 


 


At first I thought of using kefir, pineapple juice (bromelaine) or papaya juice (papain)


for their obviously strong enzymatic properties, but realized immediately


that this would produce coffee which was far too acidic (bitter).


 


So I checked to see if coconut water might have similar enzymatic properties.


This part especially interested me:


 


'Coconut water is composed of many naturally occurring bioactive enzymes


such as acid phosphatase, catalase, dehydrogenase, diastase, peroxidase, RNA-polymerases etc.


In effect, these enzymes help in the digestion and metabolism.'


 


I tried cold brewing using coconut water instead of water, and did it ever work nicely.


 


Coconut Coffee Recipe


 


  • Start in the morning and fill a glass coffee pot  with unsweetened organic coconut water.
  • Add a few scoops of ground coffee, according to how strong you want  your coffee to be.
  • Light roast is best if you want less bitterness.
  • Mix it well and leave the pot on the counter top for a few hours.
  • In the evening you can  put the pot  in the fridge for the night.
  • The next morning you can heat to drinking temperature (do not boil it).
  • Add to it what you like. 
  • In the summertime, you can have it cold and add ice.
  • The enzymatic activity of the coconut water produces strong coffee with no bitterness.
  • Easily enjoyed black .

 


If you want to cheat like this on your bulletproof coffee by including the natural sugars


of the coconut water, then use this cold brew for your bulletproof coffee once in awhile.


It will probably throw your ketosis right out of whack , so what the heck, add some 


coconut milk and coconut oil for a desert coffee.


 


  • If you are feeling really evil, try my 'Ballistic Coconut'  variation & add whipping cream and stevia hot, or coconut icecream in summertime,

Comments

  • edited May 2015

    I had an amazing cup of this coffee yesterday, it was actually the leftovers, which had been accidentally left to soak for a long time.


    The original brew had been cold brewed at room temp. for one half day on the countertop, and then put in the fridge over the night time for about nine hours.  Half of it had been drinken the next morning after straining portions of it through a small stainless steel mesh filter (one of those crude little spoon sized filters from the dollar store)  into a cup sized amount and then reheated.


     


    The remainder of the cold brew,  still full of coffee grounds, was left on the countertop at room temperature for the rest of that day and forgotten there over night until the next morning.


     


    The next morning I found the remainder of the pot still at room temp. inside the base of my coffee machine, and could not bare to throw it away as it still contained a considerable amount of pricey organic coconut water and was probably still good. considering that it had just been sitting in a cool kitchen for one extra day and night.


     


    So I heated it up and this time added some organic whipping cream and stevia to it. The coffee itself I strained through the same small wire mesh strainer instead of a paper coffee filter, and something about the way the small remainder of it had been cold brewing for two days and nights, plus strained through that coarse filter meant that it turned out really thick. The strainer seemed only to catch the larger grounds and there was this thick texture of soupy coffee almost all of which passed right through the filter to be reheated and drinken.


     


    The day before that, the coffee had been thinner and grainier with the filter catching more of the actual coffee grounds and filtering them out, leaving a thinner final brew to be reheated.


    This longer brewed coffee by the next day was different. This was thick and soupy.


     


    It seems that after two days and two nights,  the enzymes in the coconut water had gone to work and broken down quite a bit of the coffee grounds into a fine silt sediment which had formed thick coffee.


     


    When I added the thick 35% cream it became even thicker and tasted exactly like chocolate. I can't wait to make this again, and next time going to leave the entire pot cold brewing


    for two days and two nights before drinking it.


  • edited May 2015

    I am going to try this :


     


    Cold brew made with coconut water, raw coffee beans, and raw cocoa beans roasted in little bit of cocoa butter.


     


    If that doesn't sound tempting ..........it already sounds good and I haven't even tried it  yet.


     


    In a pan, I plan to roast  one half raw coffee beans, one half raw cocoa beans in a tablespoon of cocoa butter, stirring constantly, until it smells perfect (the nose will know)


     


    Grind the roasted beans up while still hot, and then add the warm grind to the coconut water


     


    The longer you cold brew it , the better it tastes. Up to two and a half days , and of course you


    can have it in the fridge for much of that time if you prefer.


    My suggestion is that the cold brew be left in the fridge for the first 36 to 48  hours


    and then left at room temperature for at least four to six hours. This will enable the


    enzymatic activity of the coconut water to go to work on dissolving the coffee/cocoa beans.


     


    The coconut water has natural antibacterial properties of its own, so if using a sterile glass pot


    and keeping it in the fridge for most of the time, there is nothing to worry about.


     


    The final brew can be  heated up before drinking.


     


    It is not necessary to boil it.


     


    If you prefer to boil your cold brew, as the final step  before drinking it, go for it.


     


     It seems better to avoid overdoing it on the heat and try to preserve some of the enzymes etc.in the original coconut water.


     


    one word of caution here


    don't drink too much of this stuff in one sitting if you have any hope of sleeping in the near future,


    it's like eating coffee beans. It will go right into your system, lasting for several hours, 


    and can even keep you awake all night.


  • *ponders* I wonder how this would do with a full 12 hour countertop brew. 




  • *ponders* I wonder how this would do with a full 12 hour countertop brew. 




     


     


    yes, I think at least 12 hours countertop is better. I am new to cold brewing, and wasn't aware that the standard


    is 12 hours at room temperature.


    So a full day and night in the fridge and then 12 hours on the countertop would do it for sure.


     


    I think i was a bit too worried about bacteria than necessary, probably because the coconut water contains that


    natural sugar. Something about leaving unsweetened coffee soaking at room temp. seemed different than the idea


    of letting that sweet coconut water sit around warm for so long. This is why I erred on the side of caution and


    suggested the longer/colder refrigeration method.


    I would guess that coconut water keeps fairly well at room temperature and that 12 hours would be fine.

  • I think you can cold brew in the fridge, regardless. I've done that once with regular cold brew coffee. It was a simultaneous test - 1 batch brewing in the fridge. 1 on the counter. Pretty sure both were perfectly normal tasting. It's been a few months since I did that test, since I don't drink coffee anymore lol.


    But yeah, if you're using coconut water, it'd probably be best to cold brew in the fridge. 




    yes, I think at least 12 hours countertop is better. I am new to cold brewing, and wasn't aware that the standard


    is 12 hours at room temperature.


    So a full day and night in the fridge and then 12 hours on the countertop would do it for sure.


     


    I think i was a bit too worried about bacteria than necessary, probably because the coconut water contains that


    natural sugar. Something about leaving unsweetened coffee soaking at room temp. seemed different than the idea


    of letting that sweet coconut water sit around warm for so long. This is why I erred on the side of caution and


    suggested the longer/colder refrigeration method.


    I would guess that coconut water keeps fairly well at room temperature and that 12 hours would be fine.



  • RekaReka ✭✭✭

    Is this going to give you coconut flavoured coffee? YUM! This sounds extremely good. 


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  • edited May 2015


    Is this going to give you coconut flavoured coffee? YUM! This sounds extremely good. 




     


    try it with coconut milk and unsalted butter added , super smooth.


     


    you don't have to add any stevia, it is just naturally sweet


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