Before I Drop $1,500 On The Bp Vibration Plate...

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Comments

  • Decided not to spend the $$$ on a vertical plane model (in Aus the only option starts at 9k after negotiations). Bought a $100 second hand rocker system and you know what, you can get vertical plane motion if you stand on one side only ;-)


     


    More to the point is actually remembering to use it...


     


    TLDR, buy a second hand unit with adjustable speeds. Don't stress over the vertical plane too much as it is still relative to your body position on the plate. I spent hours...weeks even...fretting over the small stuff. Contacted companies, import agents, dedicated vibration training professionals etc - long story short, unless you plan to do some very specific stuff, getting a good quality rocker plate system will tick all the boxes at a fraction of the cost. The unit I got second hand retailed for something crazy like AU$3500+, they're a dime a dozen if you scour your second hand sites (ebay/craigslist/gumtree/etc).


  • Here's some of my bookmarked research links for your info:


    Vibration training wrt bone density:



    http://www.vibration-training-advice.com/consumer-guide-and-safety-program/articles-21---30/vibration-training-and-bone-density

    Seriously read this entire site by vibration trainers. Lloyd knows his stuff and answered many questions for me (and ultimately I took his advice and bought a quality used pivotal)



    http://www.vibration-training-advice.com/consumer-guide-and-safety-program (read through all the articles, there's a lot to learn)


    Recommended machines: http://www.vibration-training-advice.com/consumer-guide-and-safety-program/favourites
    Crap machines: http://www.vibration-training-advice.com/consumer-guide-and-safety-program/the-blacklist

    Pivotal vs Lineal debate:



    http://au.hypervibe.com/vibration_machine_benefits.php
    http://us.hypervibe.com/blog/understanding-vibration-machine-platform-types/
  • SeanSean


    Sean, I like the simple design. How do you ensure that the motion is linear and only in the vertical axis? 




     


    Motion on most Linear WBV machines is not only in the vertical axis.  A rotating weight is used to produce vibration.  Thus displacement is in one vertical plane and the horizontal plane; both in equal magnitude.


    • With a much more complex vibration mechanism, the horizontal component can me eliminated.  But also, if you stood on a machine with only horizontal vibration, you'd experience how little affect this has on your body.
    • Why would "motion only in the vertical axis matter"?  I don't see any reason it would.  Your body doesn't notice displacement in the ground-plane or horizontal plane. 

     


     



    Contacted companies, import agents, dedicated vibration training professionals etc - long story short, unless you plan to do some very specific stuff, getting a good quality rocker plate system will tick all the boxes at a fraction of the cost.



     


    If you haven't experienced a Linear WBV machine, personally...  Then there's just no way to "know" the difference.  People talk a lot; but they don't say much.  For the sake of your own satisfaction, please find a linear WBV machine to stand of for merely 3 seconds -- you'll then know why it's only the Linear type (not pivotal / rocking type) of machines that pull people in at extreme/absurd prices.

  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭ ✭✭


    Why would "motion only in the vertical axis matter"?  I don't see any reason it would.  Your body doesn't notice displacement in the ground-plane or horizontal plane. 




     


    I recall Dave saying non-vertical vibration motion can damage joints. This makes a lot of sense to me: our bodies and the joints they contain are designed for millions of up/down duty cycles during walking, running, and jumping, as well as some foward/backward stabilization that occurs to a much lesser degree during those activities. After twisting (like I did when my ski twisted my knee around) it seems the second most common motion to cause knee injuries is side-to-side direction changes. As someone with part of my meniscus missing in one knee, I want to be sure to minimize undue stress. Shaking my knee side-to-side at a high frequency seems like something I'd like to avoid. Admittedly, I don't have research on this. 

  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭ ✭✭

    Aha. Rather than post my random recollection, I figured I'd just find the quote. JRE 274, Dave says "There's a bunch of cheap ones that do a side to side rocking that messes up your lower back."


     


    p. 96 in the transcript. You can also control-F "lower back" to find the exact sentence. 


     


    So, that's all I'm basing it on, but in general I stand by my claims that most of our joints are designed primarily for up/down duty cycles. 


  • SeanSean


    Aha. Rather than post my random recollection, I figured I'd just find the quote. JRE 274, Dave says "There's a bunch of cheap ones that do a side to side rocking that messes up your lower back."


     


    So, that's all I'm basing it on, but in general I stand by my claims that most of our joints are designed primarily for up/down duty cycles. 




     


     :)  he's talking about pivotal / rocking type machines.  Pivotal machines just feel completely different from Linear WBV.  I don't think pivotal machines belong in the category of "WBV".


     


    Most Linear WBV machines vibrate both vertically and horizontally. 


    Specifically, I mean to say that this includes The BulletProof Vibe.


     


    Displacement is everything. 


    Slight horizontal displacement: barely noticeable -- I think it can be nothing but healthy. 


    An equal amount (very little movement) of vertical displacement: extremely potent -- this is what Linear WBV is all about. 

  •  




    Motion on most Linear WBV machines is not only in the vertical axis.  A rotating weight is used to produce vibration.  Thus displacement is in one vertical plane and the horizontal plane; both in equal magnitude.


    • With a much more complex vibration mechanism, the horizontal component can me eliminated.  But also, if you stood on a machine with only horizontal vibration, you'd experience how little affect this has on your body.
    • Why would "motion only in the vertical axis matter"?  I don't see any reason it would.  Your body doesn't notice displacement in the ground-plane or horizontal plane. 

     


     


     


    If you haven't experienced a Linear WBV machine, personally...  Then there's just no way to "know" the difference.  People talk a lot; but they don't say much.  For the sake of your own satisfaction, please find a linear WBV machine to stand of for merely 3 seconds -- you'll then know why it's only the Linear type (not pivotal / rocking type) of machines that pull people in at extreme/absurd prices.




     I did stand on some lineal systems that I could get my body on and I still came to the same conclusion after experience, discussion and reading the science that a pivotal system with an adjustable speed is more than adequate for my needs.


     


    $100 pivotal vs ~$10,000 lineals in Australia is a big difference in cost compared to ~$1500 for the vibe plate in the USA. We have an extremely limited choice of options down here, short of building one yourself if you have the know-how.


  • SeanSean



    $100 pivotal vs ~$10,000 lineals in Australia is a big difference in cost compared to ~$1500 for the vibe plate in the USA. We have an extremely limited choice of options down here, short of building one yourself if you have the know-how.



     




     


    I ship internationally.  Unfortunately, to Australia, shipping may cost upwards of $700.

  • I have been saving up for quite a while and finally bought the BP vibe.  It is a very powerful machine!  Yesterday, I did some weighted squats, dead lifts, rows, dips, and pushups on it.  I ended every set with an isometric hold until I could not take it any more.  I am quite sore today.


  • KentekaKenteka

    I too have been debating as to whether to take the plunge with purchasing a linear type vibe plate. I live in the UK so Sean’s WBV wins out on weight and shipping cost.


    I practise the Alexander Technique, which involves allowing the natural tensegrity structure of the body to return through direction and letting go of tensions in the body. Recently I’ve been hearing more and more people talking about “fascia” and it came up in Chris McDougalls recent book Natural Born Heroes (which is a great read /audio book by the way).


    There are already numerous practises which aim to release tensions in the muscles and fascia using various shaking techniques and “discharge” locked emotions or “reset” the body after a difficult day. For example:


    1)       Vibration training as per Scott Sonon’s RESET drill http://www.recuper8.org/


    2)       Bioenergetic, Elliot Hulse: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZ-9i-QFIgU


    3)       Tension/Trauma Releasing Exercises (TRE) Dr. David Berceli http://traumaprevention.com/


    The idea being that vibrating /shaking is done by animals in the wild and is a natural healthy response to shocks. The linear type vibe platforms look like they more closely mimic this action to some extent and should super charge the effects?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5LyRrJimaI


    So whilst I am sure the vibe platforms are great for lymphatic drainage, bone density etc I would love to hear how people are feeling from regular use. I am thinking perhaps a change in the quality of the muscles which goes beyond toning, possibly improved elasticity and ability to relax, improved proprioception? I’m also wondering if anyone has felt more free from past emotional baggage or just more energy in general from using a vibe?


    Love to hear your experiences.


  • CalvinCalvin

    I'm a little skeptical of this. Never has the body been exposed to this kind of vibration throughout evolutionary time. I'm worried about the brain. I know it's floating is some kind of liquid, but still...


    Why not jump with a rope or use a trampoline or something. Just bring a rope with you when you take a jog and do 5-10 minutes of jumping..


  • KentekaKenteka
    Hi Calvin, yes of course that is the other side. I was talking to an instructor in London who used to have a studio full of the linear vibe platforms for classes. After years of use he has now switched them out for rebounders, because they are more natural.
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