Blendtec Setting For Coffee?

Hey Everyone,


 


Any Blendtec users out the who make Bulletproof Coffee? --- If so what setting do you use? Smoothie? Milkshake? etc.


Comments

  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭

    Set phasers to stun!


  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    I don't have a Blendtec, but for a similarish, high-powered blender, I blend about 30-40 seconds on the highest setting. If I'm adding collagen, I do so at the end and blend on low for ~10 seconds. Or I stir it in right before I drink it.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

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  • I've wondered what others do here.


     


    I put the butter, coffee and mct oil in and blend it on the small smoothie setting, which gets cranking. Then I add in the collagen protein and manually put it on the 2nd from the lowest speed for 15 seconds.


     


    From what I've read Dave say, you absolutely want to blend the butter and mct oil at a high speed to emulsify the fats, but you don't want to blend the collagen protein at a high speed as it does something negative to it. Not sure what.


  • I think you've said why you get rid of the foam, but that's just crazy talk. Foam is the best part. 


     




    Then I add in the collagen protein and manually put it on the 2nd from the lowest speed for 15 seconds.


     


    From what I've read Dave say, you absolutely want to blend the butter and mct oil at a high speed to emulsify the fats, but you don't want to blend the collagen protein at a high speed as it does something negative to it. Not sure what.




     


    Proteins are long strands of amino acids. Powerful blenders can literally tear them apart. FWIW I'll blend collagen for only about 3 seconds and it seems to incorporate without grittiness just fine. Since the collagen kills the foam, I do an additional high speed pulse (the squiggly line on the Blendtec Designer series) for a second or two to get that back. Still only about 5 seconds of blending with protein. 


     


    I use the egg whisk setting for the coffee because Blendtecs are loud and I have neighbors downstairs, but faster and longer is probably better. 


  • thanks for that explanation about proteins. Makes sense.


     


    And I'll try cutting down the time to 5 seconds on the collagen blend. do you think going longer at the slower setting is damaging the protein?


  • ACH85ACH85 ✭✭
    edited August 2015

    I really don't know. Is it that any blending will damage a strand of protein or two, and you just get more strands damaged with longer blend times? Or maybe only higher speeds have enough force to break the chemical bonds holding the amino acids together as complex proteins? I'm not sure.


     


    But if you can get smooth coffee at 5 seconds of low speed, why do anything else? With protein, the logical choice seems to be to just blend the minimum to get the results you want. I add the pulse because the part of the result I want is foam. 


  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    I don't understand this notion that blending "damages" the proteins. I mean, yeah, it hacks the chains apart, but aren't they going to be broken down in the body to their constituent parts anyhow? I fail to see how this is an issue. Any insights, ACH85?


     


    I've always blended the collagen last, and only briefly. Same when I add whey to smoothies. But it would be more convenient to throw everything in at once and just throttle it.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!



  • I don't understand this notion that blending "damages" the proteins. I mean, yeah, it hacks the chains apart, but aren't they going to be broken down in the body to their constituent parts anyhow? I fail to see how this is an issue. Any insights, ACH85?




     


    Because Dave Said So. 


     


    My only speculation here is that perhaps our enzymes break down proteins in specific ways, whereas high-force blending does so in haphazard ways. 


     


    Here we have a collagen protein strand:


     


    collagen_%28alpha_chain%29.jpg


     


    Will blending cleave the protein into glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline? Or into chunks smaller than amino acids that may be unusable? Or into some sort of weird half-collagen+glycine thingy? I don't know. In fact I wouldn't be shocked to learn that the bonds of amino acids are strong enough that yes, you cleave the collagen into useful bits while blending. Or not. 


     


    If you want more, send it over to a Q&A. I'm cool with just blending proteins later. In fact, in the time my coffee/smoothie is blending, I reach over to the cabinet, retrieve my protein, and ready the little scooper spoon. So no time is really lost. 

  • You eat oatmeal? Why aren't you dead yet?


     


    I kid.


  • ah, then you can eat anything and thrive.


  • sparefilmssparefilms Post-human Construct ✭✭✭


    I mix protein powder into my oatmeal, if I do it when it's really hot it makes cottage cheese, if I wait 10 minutes it doesn't. What does it mean? It means I don't like it all fucked up so I wait. Are there any other side effects? I'll never have to find out. Haha.




    Side effects include: deliciousness.


     


     




    I'm Scottish.




    No True Scotsman puts protein powder in his oatmeal. Jason puts protein powder in his oatmeal.  Jason is No True Scotsman.


     


    Fixed it for you. (Couldn't resist, oatmeal/porridge is the example that is always used!) 

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