Fat linked to spread of cancer

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161207132117.htm

COULD somebody break this down for me and explain to me if this applies to us as in those are the bulletproof diet.

Comments

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    @Jason Miller said:
    Bp coffee is very high in palmitic acid.

    hairy feet Jason... ?

    fake it till you make it

  • The only type of fat mentioned in the article is palmitic acid, which is 9.5% of coconut oil and is not in mct oil since it is an mct. The article also says a 'high fat diet' yet it failed to report the breakdown of what type of fat is fed to the mice apart from palmatic acid. The type of study is only useful to scientists who are looking to study how cancer cells spread and grow and not very useful to you and me

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    @Jason Miller said:
    Butter is high in palmitic acid.

    a smidge over 3 grams per tablespoon(14g), according to the usda nutrient db (~22.7g per 100g).

    ( can I delete my first comment (rhetorical). I forgot about butter. I mean seriously, who puts butter in their coffee.... )

    fake it till you make it

  • Butter is 31% palmatic acid. The dose makes the posion and the article fails to mention dose. This seems to be a case of don't throw the baby out wih the bath water @Jason Miller

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    @Jistbug said:
    Butter is 31% palmatic acid. ...

    @Jistbug that's higher than I could find, interested, do you have a ref you can point me to. thx

    fake it till you make it

  • JistbugJistbug
    edited December 2016

    @daz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfat I could have spent more time to search a more conclusive answer but I figured this is good enough? A billion monkeys with keyboards can't be wrong, right?

  • @Jason Miller I think we're both trying to go in the same Direction yet have different approaches to the solution. While butter does contain palmitic acid, the absolute risk seems to be relatively low considering eating Bulletproof has a wide variety of fats and palmitic acid would only be a very small part of the overall diet

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    @Jistbug said:
    @daz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfat I could have spent more time to search a more conclusive answer but I figured this is good enough? A billion monkeys with keyboards can't be wrong, right?

    thx. yep. saw that one, ~31% of butterFat. butter itself is around 22% palmitic acid by weight.
    (water content of butter is around 18% by weight)

    fake it till you make it

  • WalterWalter ✭✭✭

    All about context, as always. When someone has cancer to begin with, you can be damned sure that person has (or had in the past) a few more pressing issues than intake of palmitic acid.

    More studies are needed to unravel this intriguing relationship, above all because industrialised countries are registering an alarming increase in the consumption of saturated fats and sugar," warns Professor Benitah. "Fat is necessary for the function of the body, but uncontrolled intake can have an effect on health, as already shown for some tumours such as colon cancer, and in metastasis, as we demonstrate here."

    Shocking.

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    Similar sort of study here...
    http://www.bmj.com/content/355/bmj.i5796
    "Intake of individual saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease in US men and women: two prospective longitudinal cohort studies"
    ...only this one relates to heart disease.

    & the 'press release' ; https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/saturated-fats-increased-heart-disease-risk/

    fake it till you make it

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    A high fat diet usually means a lot of fat and carbs. It is not the same as a ketogenic diet. Since the body metabolizes fat differently in this situation I am curious as to how much this applies to the general bulletproofer. Especially because ketogenic diets seem to help at least somewhat with treating cancer...

    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • dazdaz today is a good day ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    I expect(guess) it depends on the type of cancer with regards to keto diets...
    Are there any pro keto cancer studies.

    I remember seeing a few studies where keto diets did not come out too well with regards to cancer, but never looked in to it any further.
    here are the studies I bookmarked;

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.4161/cc.10.8.15330
    "Ketones and lactate increase cancer cell “stemness,” driving recurrence, metastasis and poor clinical outcome in breast cancer"

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19443154
    "Tumor growth in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex on the ketogenic diet"

    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep21807?WT.feed_name=subjects_renal-cancer
    "Long-term High Fat Ketogenic Diet Promotes Renal Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Tuberous Sclerosis" (rat study)

    fake it till you make it

  • DManDMan Master of Arts ✭✭✭

    @daz said:
    I expect(guess) it depends on the type of cancer with regards to keto diets...
    Are there any pro keto cancer studies.

    I remember seeing a few studies where keto diets did not come out too well with regards to cancer, but never looked in to it any further.
    here are the studies I bookmarked;

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.4161/cc.10.8.15330
    "Ketones and lactate increase cancer cell “stemness,” driving recurrence, metastasis and poor clinical outcome in breast cancer"

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19443154
    "Tumor growth in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex on the ketogenic diet"

    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep21807?WT.feed_name=subjects_renal-cancer
    "Long-term High Fat Ketogenic Diet Promotes Renal Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Tuberous Sclerosis" (rat study)

    There is plenty of research going on but it is still in the early stage aka "pre clinical trials" aka mice and stuff... so far it seems a combination of ketogenic diet and radiation therapy seem like a good potential approach for future clinical trials. Some phase 1 clinical trials are on their way. Phase 1 is more about potential side effects rather than therapeutic value for peeps who are interested....

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4215472/

    Despite recent advances in chemo-radiation, the prognosis for many cancer patients remains poor, and most current treatments are limited by severe adverse events. Therefore, there is a great need for complimentary approaches that have limited patient toxicity while selectively enhancing therapy responses in cancer versus normal tissues. Ketogenic diets could represent a potential dietary manipulation that could be rapidly implemented for the purpose of exploiting inherent oxidative metabolic differences between cancer cells and normal cells to improve standard therapeutic outcomes by selectively enhancing metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells.

    Although the mechanism by which ketogenic diets demonstrate anticancer effects when combined with standard radio-chemo-therapies has not been fully elucidated, preclinical results have demonstrated the safety and potential efficacy of using ketogenic diets in combination with radio-chemo-therapy to improve responses in murine cancer models. These preclinical studies have provided the impetus for extending the use of ketogenic diets into phase I clinical trials that are currently ongoing.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26782788

    Although the full mechanism by which ketogenic diets improve oncological and neurological conditions still remains to be elucidated, their clinical efficacy has attracted many new followers, and ketogenic diets can be a good option as a co-adjuvant therapy, depending on the situation and the extent of the disease.

    May you be well, may you be happy, may you be healthy, may you be loved.

    How much to eat:
    advanced | How to train: bulletproof training | HRV: HRV FOR TRAINING HRV BASICS What Affects HRV | Brain  & Memory dual n back training advanced training

     

     

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited December 2016

    I guess this is stating the obvious, but this was a mouse study, and mice metabolize fats differently than humans. Clearly, more research is needed.

    It is also of note that this article is more of an interview than a typical peer-reviewed study. Anyone have a link to the original experiment design, method, and results? When you look at scientific research, it's best not to jump straight to the conclusion. You want to take in all of the components. Much of the time, I skip the conclusion.

  • Hi I have just joined this forum and bulletproof, I am leaning back toward paleo and cherry picking any logical hacks and experimenting. Its funny how as soon as a new approach and lifestyle appears then so do the negatives. Four people in my immediate family have succumbed to cancer anything that could even reduce the odds would be fine. Our Ancestors seem to have very minimal occurrence's of many of these modern diseases, I am leaning toward 90% paleo and a bit of bulletproof until the science becomes irrefutable.

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