Carbohydrates Before Training

What is the rationale for not taking in any carbohydrates before training?


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  • Because anything you consume before your training cannot be assimilated fast enough to do you any good during the training. Those carbs will do nothing for you, if your muscle glycogen stores are low (which they aren't unless you've been keto for an extended period of time), you should have been eating carbs way before that pre workout training window to refill your muscles.


     


    If you are training in a carbohydrate rich environment (e.g., not in a keto state), and you're running a marathon, where you'll be doing aerobic exercise for 2+ hours, consuming some carbs mid workout would be beneficial.


     


    I'm assuming you're talking about an average gym session 1 hour or less, though.


     


     


    There are many recognized health benefits to training fasted, additionally you're able to continue burning body fat while exercising whereas if you spike your blood sugar with the ill conceived pre-workout drink insulin spikes and fat burning stops.


     


    Such a HUGE majority of the "SCIENCE" out there supporting so much of what people believe was funded by companies trying to SELL something.


     


    6 Meals a day - selling snacks, power bars, protein shakes


    Pre-workout - selling shakes, power bars, protein...


    Post-workout - see above...


     


    What if everyone knew you could eat ONCE every 24 hours and it would not slow down your metabolism, and that "6 small meals" a day was total bullshit? It'd be hard to sell something.


     


    What if everyone knew that it does no good to take a pre-workout carb/protein shake? (Small amount of BCAA are beneficial though). magazines that exist solely to sell product would not exist.


     


    What if everyone knew there is no difference in protein synthesis between 1 hour post workout, 4 hours or 6 hours?? Hard to sell protein if all the bros at the gym knew they could just go home within the next 4 hours and cook something, and it'd actually be MORE beneficial to them, since they would still be burning body fat post workout.


     


    So I guess I'd have to ask, what is the rational FOR taking in carbs before training?


  • M. ThomasM. Thomas A Stick of Butter a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.

    The answer is complicated.  It is not just some set in stone definition of you do this pre workout and you do this post workout.  The truth of the matter is dependent on many factors...i.e. workout goals, personal physiology, previous diet...


  • Because anything you consume before your training cannot be assimilated fast enough to do you any good during the training. Those carbs will do nothing for you, if your muscle glycogen stores are low (which they aren't unless you've been keto for an extended period of time), you should have been eating carbs way before that pre workout training window to refill your muscles.


     


    If you are training in a carbohydrate rich environment (e.g., not in a keto state), and you're running a marathon, where you'll be doing aerobic exercise for 2+ hours, consuming some carbs mid workout would be beneficial.


     


    I'm assuming you're talking about an average gym session 1 hour or less, though.


     


     


    There are many recognized health benefits to training fasted, additionally you're able to continue burning body fat while exercising whereas if you spike your blood sugar with the ill conceived pre-workout drink insulin spikes and fat burning stops.


     


    Such a HUGE majority of the "SCIENCE" out there supporting so much of what people believe was funded by companies trying to SELL something.


     


    6 Meals a day - selling snacks, power bars, protein shakes


    Pre-workout - selling shakes, power bars, protein...


    Post-workout - see above...


     


    What if everyone knew you could eat ONCE every 24 hours and it would not slow down your metabolism, and that "6 small meals" a day was total bullshit? It'd be hard to sell something.


     


    What if everyone knew that it does no good to take a pre-workout carb/protein shake? (Small amount of BCAA are beneficial though). magazines that exist solely to sell product would not exist.


     


    What if everyone knew there is no difference in protein synthesis between 1 hour post workout, 4 hours or 6 hours?? Hard to sell protein if all the bros at the gym knew they could just go home within the next 4 hours and cook something, and it'd actually be MORE beneficial to them, since they would still be burning body fat post workout.


     


    So I guess I'd have to ask, what is the rational FOR taking in carbs before training?


     


    Awesome answer! I figured it was the digestion taking time and the fat loss from training fasted.. but was looking for a more detailed answer. Thanks B

  • The answer is complicated.  It is not just some set in stone definition of you do this pre workout and you do this post workout.  The truth of the matter is dependent on many factors...i.e. workout goals, personal physiology, previous diet...


     


    I'm trying to gain muscle. 

  • Fast acting carbs will be absorbed pre work out in time to benefit your training in many ways.

    Fuel for the muscle is important when lifting weights for an hour or so.

    Since I've switched to carbs pre w/o & non post w/o my results have increased dramatically.

    Decreased body fat, increase in strength & lean muscle gain.

    It makes sense to eat carbs pre activity to be used as energy & not stored as fat & no carbs post activity when no energy is required.
  • jspadejspade You are what you eat eats!

    Ablett!


    When you say carbs pre w/o are you talking the night before or hours before? I w/o in the morning (m/w/f) fasted, and am thinking I should have a few extra carbs the night before so I can handle the w/o load the next morning. But everything I've read ie. leangains, cbl says carbs at night after a workout.


  • There is a fantastic book on this topic called "Nutrient Timing".    There is a difference between recovering from a long distance training workout and a weight training workout.  Several earlier comments are 100% correct in that magazines are trying to sell supplements however after a weight training workout an insulin spike is desirable.  I personally tailor my nutrition to length of time training and specific training.  Before a weight training workout I do not eat carbs, especially fast acting carbs.  This will create an insulin spike that is not benefical for me.  While Hammer Nutrition could fit in the category of selling supplements they have some excellent literature based on strong research regarding this topic.


  • Ablett!

    When you say carbs pre w/o are you talking the night before or hours before? I w/o in the morning (m/w/f) fasted, and am thinking I should have a few extra carbs the night before so I can handle the w/o load the next morning. But everything I've read ie. leangains, cbl says carbs at night after a workout.




    Weight training in a fasted state is detrimental for muscle growth & strength gains.

    What time do u train in the morning?

    U should be able to fit in Some whey/dextrose / mct oil/ cocoa powder 30mins before?
  • There is a fantastic book on this topic called "Nutrient Timing".    There is a difference between recovering from a long distance training workout and a weight training workout.  Several earlier comments are 100% correct in that magazines are trying to sell supplements however after a weight training workout an insulin spike is desirable.  I personally tailor my nutrition to length of time training and specific training.  Before a weight training workout I do not eat carbs, especially fast acting carbs.  This will create an insulin spike that is not benefical for me.  While Hammer Nutrition could fit in the category of selling supplements they have some excellent literature based on strong research regarding this topic.


     


    What is the benefit of an insulin spike post training? Your muscles are insulin resistant after training.


     


    I've heard the rationale that bodybuilders use insulin, therefore it's beneficial to get that spike. Except the problem is bodybuilders use exogenous insulin which is completely different than you drinking some dextrose and getting that natural insulin spike. Anytime you go supratherapeutical with a hormone you're going to get very different results than what's naturally possible. 

  • Weight training in a fasted state is detrimental for muscle growth & strength gains.

     


     


    You're obviously basing your information on old broscience that's hardly even mainstream anymore. This is completely untrue.

  • Carbs pre workout does absolutely nothing. Listen to The podcast with John kiefer and dave asprey. Kiefer made carb back loading, works well.
  • RodRod The Rodfather
    edited April 2013

    Carbs pre workout does absolutely nothing. Listen to The podcast with John kiefer and dave asprey. Kiefer made carb back loading, works well.


     


    That's a good one, also the one with fatigue by Tim Noakes. Thinking you slow down because a lack of  carbs is BS! Go listen to that podcast and learn about the" Governor Model" 


     


    I know this personally is true because I would kill 3 hour training sessions off 1lbs of grass fed beef almost a full stick of K.G.


    Everything I learned about "biohacking" has been baby steps to "circadian biology", that's where the real biohacking comes in. You can buy a bunch of cool shit to "hack" but if you don't have context, you're not winning. Paleo is just a brand now and too many have opinions, it's on you to read and reread the material to not only find truth but to connect the dots. Much love to everyone who has helped me on my journey for restoring my health, please keep in touch. Feel free to message me with health questions Con[email protected] 

  • My favorite comment so far is your body is insulin resistant after a workout.  This is erroneous.  The body is insulin receptive after a weight training workout.  This is the time it needs Protein and Carbs to rebuild.  After about a two hour window the body will become insulin resistant.  The timing of certain nutrients will greatly benefit your efforts.


  • My favorite comment so far is your body is insulin resistant after a workout.  This is erroneous.  The body is insulin receptive after a weight training workout.  This is the time it needs Protein and Carbs to rebuild.  After about a two hour window the body will become insulin resistant.  The timing of certain nutrients will greatly benefit your efforts.


     


    The statement was your MUSCLES are insulin resistant immediately following weight training. Your fat cells are not... Go ahead and get your big carb spike immediately post workout.


     


    The "two hours" is false, read some scientific research on the matter, they've done studies with post workout nutrition and there was zero difference in muscle protein synthesis, 2, 4 and 6 hour post workout meals. 


     


    Interview with Ori:


     


    CW: Ori, throughout the majority of my career I’ve

    recommended fast-acting carbs with protein powder in the post-workout

    meal in order to get an insulin spike and shuttle amino acids into the

    muscles for growth and repair. But after consulting with you I’ve

    realized that I might have been wrong with this approach.



    Can you explain the problems with ingesting simple carbs such as raisins or cherry juice immediately after training?



    Ori Hofmekler: First off, after training your muscle

    becomes temporarily insulin resistant. That’s due to tissue

    micro-injuries which impair the mechanism that utilizes glucose in your

    muscle. Putting a high glycemic fuel in your muscle right after exercise

    will jeopardize energy utilization and disrupt your insulin

    sensitivity. High glycemic fuel includes all kinds of sugars, dried

    fruits and refined flour.



    One of the biggest misconceptions is the idea that an insulin spike

    is necessary for boosting protein synthesis in the muscle. The truth is

    quite different. The real factor is not insulin spike but rather insulin

    sensitivity.



    It has been proven that as long as insulin sensitivity is high, even

    low (fasting) insulin levels along with amino acids will be sufficient

    to trigger mTOR/AKT – the cellular pathway that deposits protein in the

    muscle towards repair and growth.



    Overly spiking insulin with simple carbs immediately after exercise

    impairs insulin sensitivity and diminishes your capacity to sustain a

    healthy metabolism and a lean, strong physique.


     


    http://chadwaterbury.com/the-truth-about-post-workout-nutrition/


     


    Kiefer also talks about muscles being insulin resistant immediately following weight lifting, and how you should wait to ingest anything with carbs.


     


    Your statements are baseless which has been perpetrated by bad information floating around gyms and messages boards, and no science to back it up.


     


    Ori goes into the science behind it, if you want to learn something you should check it out: http://www.amazon.com/Maximum-Muscle-Minimum-Fat-Transformation/dp/1556436890/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1365615509&sr=8-3&keywords=ori+hofmekler

  • you guys are mixing me up... either you need some carbs after workout or you don't.... which one is it so I can plan? lmao


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