Hypnosis-Behavior Modification-What Has Worked For You?

Hey guys, I was wanting to get people's feedback on hypnosis programs that have worked (or not worked) for them. I am very interested in behavior/habit modification and want to here people success in what has worked training their brains whether it be a bad habit or a complete life overhaul. Hope to hear some interesting stories.


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Comments

  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    I recommend the Paul McKenna Instant Confidence CD (I have his whole range of books). Its a 1/2 hour audio that relaxes you and lightly hypnotises you. After a couple of tries, I'd go about my day, then double-take and think "I wouldn't have done that before!" so it produced very subtle improvements. I think it would work on anyone.


  • It probably depends on what you are trying to do-- and not everything works on the same person.  The why of the habit matters too, if it is a form of defense mechanism, habit, etc... is it an interpersonal habit (ie how you talk with people), a health habit (it could simply be an issue of building the habit in the style of BJ Fogg, or it might be there is some emotional block).... 


     


    I've heard hypnotherapy can be a powerful tool-- one word of caution, I've had a hypnotherapist try to 'plant' something that may not have happened, I simply have no memory of a certain event and she insisted something happened that there is no memory of.  So recordings are probably ok, someone vetted by a friend.   




    If it is a willpower issue, I gave an answering summarizing someone else's research on Quora.


     


    non hypnotherapy modalities that can help with behavioral/emotional change:  


    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    EMDR


    Somatic Experiencing


    Parts Work/Internal Family Systems/Jungian Voice Dialogue/ Focusing

    Dialectical Behavioral therapy


    Self-Compassion


     




     


  • MaverickAzzMaverickAzz Powerful

    It probably depends on what you are trying to do-- and not everything works on the same person.  The why of the habit matters too, if it is a form of defense mechanism, habit, etc... is it an interpersonal habit (ie how you talk with people), a health habit (it could simply be an issue of building the habit in the style of BJ Fogg, or it might be there is some emotional block).... 


     


    I've heard hypnotherapy can be a powerful tool-- one word of caution, I've had a hypnotherapist try to 'plant' something that may not have happened, I simply have no memory of a certain event and she insisted something happened that there is no memory of.  So recordings are probably ok, someone vetted by a friend.   




    If it is a willpower issue, I gave an answering summarizing someone else's research on Quora.


     


    non hypnotherapy modalities that can help with behavioral/emotional change:  


    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    EMDR


    Somatic Experiencing


    Parts Work/Internal Family Systems/Jungian Voice Dialogue/ Focusing

    Dialectical Behavioral therapy


    Self-Compassion


     




     


     


     


    That's a great point. I've had excellent results, but you're basically opening the door of your head for someone to plant some BS. You have to vet them and trust them. I've got "my guy" that I go to now and then and the difference is astonishing. I trust him. If anything, he's removed memories of things that may have happened or that I may have made up, and I would use these memories as a stumbling block that would hinder further growth. It helps when they're actually a psychologist too, and not someone that's done a 7 day hypnotherapy course from eBay. ;)


    Ask for qualifications, then look them up. 

    No sorcery, just science. 

  • I am very interested in somatic experiencing.  I do the trama releasing exercises from http://traumaprevention.com/ but I would like to branch out.  It is highly effective!


  • edited June 2013

    This is something that I'm really interested in. Jason Hooper, do you believe those exercises could potentially be helpful for minor PTSD-type anxiety/generalized anxiety? That's something I'm still working on - interestingly diet alone has helped a lot and that's probably due to a healthier brain and nervous system. The way I got into all this health and nutrition information was because of an unfortunate event that took place in which I accidentally ingested a powerful deliriant without knowing. I used to get to the point of nearly having panic attacks just thinking about the event and it would almost cause flashbacks. I'm now over that - I can describe the event without major anxiety (minor anxiety when thinking of it persists), but day-to-day anxiety persists. It is something that has and continues to improve, but it has been nearly 16 months now (not including many other psychological symptoms).


     


    I meditate off and on, but sometimes that gets.... weird. I experience odd physical sensations such as: a sensation of weightlessness, a sensation of being lifted up, a sensation of becoming smaller, sensation of "going out of body", among other sensations. It sometimes produces a "high" in me as well.


     


    I'd be interested in trying those techniques, or one of the recommendations from abright - I just have far too tight of funds. I contemplated EDMR but all the local practitioners were costly and just didn't seem qualified enough in my eyes. Thanks for any input!


    http://equilibriohm.wordpress.com/

    http://biohacksblog.com/

    Natural ability without education has more often raised a man to glory and virtue than education without natural ability. - Marcus Aurelius 


  • This is something that I'm really interested in. Jason Hooper, do you believe those exercises could potentially be helpful for minor PTSD-type anxiety/generalized anxiety? That's something I'm still working on - interestingly diet alone has helped a lot and that's probably due to a healthier brain and nervous system. The way I got into all this health and nutrition information was because of an unfortunate event that took place in which I accidentally ingested a powerful deliriant without knowing. I used to get to the point of nearly having panic attacks just thinking about the event and it would almost cause flashbacks. I'm now over that - I can describe the event without major anxiety (minor anxiety when thinking of it persists), but day-to-day anxiety persists. It is something that has and continues to improve, but it has been nearly 16 months now (not including many other psychological symptoms).


     


    I meditate off and on, but sometimes that gets.... weird. I experience odd physical sensations such as: a sensation of weightlessness, a sensation of being lifted up, a sensation of becoming smaller, sensation of "going out of body", among other sensations. It sometimes produces a "high" in me as well.


     


    I'd be interested in trying those techniques, or one of the recommendations from abright - I just have far too tight of funds. I contemplated EDMR but all the local practitioners were costly and just didn't seem qualified enough in my eyes. Thanks for any input!


    ======


    Sorry you had that experience. Imagining myself ingesting a powerful deliriant and the figuring it out later makes me twitchy.  Glad you are feeling better and hope you find a full recovery.


     


     


    Some people use Somatic Experiencing (Peter Levine's work, like Waking the Tiger) for helping with PTSD.  One of the exercises from another book "Healing Trauma" is for reintegrating with your body- the theory being that for some trauma makes the body a not safe place to be/notice- is to gently rub all parts of your body with your hands or a water massager and mindfully notice them and say "this is my [body] it belongs to me"... Depending on your belief system(s) though, and which book of Peter's you read first, he can rub some people the wrong way.  


    Briefly looking at the TRE stuff Jason posted, it sounds like it is based on similar principles of SE... that the body stores trauma and there are different ways to release that, included letting the body complete the tremor/shaking response.  Reading their site makes me sorry I missed their workshop in April!


    A book that some people have found useful, based on "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy" by Stephen Hayes is called "Get out of your mind and into your life" does deal well with mild anxiety for some people.  Another book that may be useful (although more in the cognitive behavioral therapy realm) is "Feeling Good" by Dr. Burns.  Books: cheaper than seeing a therapist, and for some, as effective. ;)


    I discovered that aniracetam may have some anxiolytic effects-- Dave gave 2 to my mom (who is anxiously oriented) and my outside observation was that she talked less, and seemed calmer-- her subjective experience was that she was funnier.  


    What style meditation are you doing?  Some of what you've described sounds within a range of normal, although uncomfortable for some.  

  • I am really interested in this for sports.


     


    I somewhat have a psychological barrier when it comes to fighting and I would really like to get over it. When I am in a competition it is not too bad because everything is so fast so I can't think anyway, but I have a real aversion for "risky" moves in sparring training, and this ends up manifesting itself in a certain style which is slow and not that effective against certain people.


     


    The goal is to think in a way that will facilitate getting faster, reacting better and to be more confident in attackes and risky moves. Of course there is the training component, but I think a healthy mind lets the healthy body perform as well as possible.


     


    Although many people have recommended I actually see someone instead of getting tapes - I was fairly new to the whole concept, and I have a skeptical partner, so I bought an online sports hypnosis session.


     


    For all intensive purposes I think I am being relaxed into a state that I might call hypnosis (of course I could be wrong), but I have not notices any extreme differences in my outlook. Indeed after going off my depression medication I think i might actually be getting worse in this respect.


     


    As I find the tape a good tool for relaxing I still listen to it. I don't think there is anything wrong with someone guiding you to relaxing and trying to encourage you to feel more confident about yourself, but I would indeed like to improve my brain in this perspective.


     


    A few different suggestions have been raised which I will definately check out - if anyone has any experience along the lines of mine, any tips would be greatly appreciated!


  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    I think you'd benefit from Mr McKenna! Here's the book/CD, its pretty cheap: http://www.bookdepository.com/Instant-Confidence-Paul-McKenna/9780593055359


  • Glad to see another advocate of McKenna^ lol. Thanks a lot abright! I'm going to look into all the books you suggested and hopefully purchase some in the near future. I still have so much material to read right now, but maybe I should prioritize those books since there is already a wealth of information through various blogs. Some of what you suggested I have heard of before, maybe a little different but very similar. I watch a lot of Elliott Hulse's psychology/philosophy videos (strength trainer/strongman) and he is a big proponent of "bio-energetic releases" and exercises. Basically, as theorized by many psychologists, psychological/emotional tension can take hold in the physical body, so it's best to rid those tensions and break apart the "muscular armoring". Osho has some great dynamic meditations for this. May have to look into doing them once a week or so while grounding outside.


     


    I have done various kinds of meditations - typically I just focus on my breath, though. Normally, I sit down and put on binaural audio through squareeater.com and do deep nasal breathing while focusing on my breath. Other times I just listen to ambient, peaceful sounds and focus on the breath. I have done it while attempting to sleep before as well, saying "OM" to myself. All of these have had similar effects in terms of 'odd sensations'. Mostly the binaural beats did though - I remember one day walking into class after a morning of binaural audio and light meditation I felt as if I were walking on clouds or something, it was incredibly odd. Thanks again for your thorough response to me, greatly appreciated!


    http://equilibriohm.wordpress.com/

    http://biohacksblog.com/

    Natural ability without education has more often raised a man to glory and virtue than education without natural ability. - Marcus Aurelius 

  • Thats awesome stuff guys keep it coming. I too have listened to some of McKenna's stuff but to some extent, like most other self hypnosis, it seems to stop working rather quickly. I guess i just plateau.


    Has anyone tried any of paul scheele's work using paraliminals,or holosync? I've heard good things. I really want to start learning how to hack human behavioral potential if that make any sense. I am super interested in that portion of the brain that we don't use. Unlike Dave i don't have the capital to shell out 15k to have a laser or whatever he had aimed at his head that made a huge difference. I want to start combining nootropics/meditation/hypnosis to really break through some mental barriers and really see if i can truly change the way my brain operates. 


     


    anyone else have any of the same aspirations and had any success?


  • OceanRayOceanRay
    edited June 2013

    Has anyone tried any of paul scheele's work using paraliminals,or holosync?


     


    Scheele is okay. A lot of the CD hypnotists/affirmation/binaurals do don't much beyond what 30 mins relaxation, going inward and thinking good thoughts will do.


     


    Deeper changes require bigger commitements. A super-skilled hypnotist can help effect amazing change, but anyone going that deep inside you, had better be good. Many hypnotists are not.


     


    Like abrite says, Peter Levine has done amazing work, but he's talking about recovery from severe trauma, which is not your problem it seems. 




    It’s a big error the way US/therapeutic culture has overemphasised positive thinking/affirmations, to the exclusion of ‘realistic thinking’.


    Negative thoughts are crucial at times.Anxiety has advantages in some situations.


    There is a woman in my organisation who is clinically depressed, when I want a clear and accurate overview of what's going on, I go to her.


     


    We are highly social animals and one of the biggest blocks to change is the people around us; friends/family/co-workers. That doesn't necessarily mean keep away from negative people, but socialising your incentives and desire to chnage can do a lot more than some dude talking in your earbuds over the sound of ocean waves.


     


    It's a lifetime of exploration ...





     


  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited June 2013

    @BigPapaChakra: There have been a lot of testimonials that would indicate that TRE may help with all sorts of trauma.  They used to have a tutorial available on YouTube, but they took it down.  I made the process more Bulletproof by skipping all of the stretching anyway (which was the first forty-five minutes.)  The only useful information for me was to actually get into position.  You are a jiu-jitsu guy, so this will be easy.  Lie on your back, put the soles of your feet together and get into a good butterfly guard position optimal for structural support (45°-45°-45°-45°.)  Begin by transferring your weight to your shoulder blades and raise your buttocks off the mat by about six inches.  Relax and allow your legs to twitch.  If your upper body begins to move, go with it.  Some people rock back and forth, some people convulse all over.  It is different for everyone.  When you get some good tremors going, slowly lower your self back on the mat and relax into some more tremors.


     


    @abright: I was thinking of going to a Feldenkrais seminar.  Maybe it is just the marketing, but it sounds to me like a poor man's Jay Schroder (without the electrostimulation.)  I love the holistic concept!  Balance your autonomic nervous system, learn functional movement, and create lasting neuroplasty.  Do you know anything about this?  Are these claims too good to be true?


     


    http://www.somatic.com/articles/feldenkrais_overview.pdf


  • Scheele is okay. A lot of the CD hypnotists/affirmation/binaurals do don't much beyond what 30 mins relaxation, going inward and thinking good thoughts will do.


     


    Deeper changes require bigger commitements. A super-skilled hypnotist can help effect amazing change, but anyone going that deep inside you, had better be good. Many hypnotists are not.


     


    Like abrite says, Peter Levine has done amazing work, but he's talking about recovery from severe trauma, which is not your problem it seems. 




    It’s a big error the way US/therapeutic culture has overemphasised positive thinking/affirmations, to the exclusion of ‘realistic thinking’.


    Negative thoughts are crucial at times.Anxiety has advantages in some situations.


    There is a woman in my organisation who is clinically depressed, when I want a clear and accurate overview of what's going on, I go to her.


     


    We are highly social animals and one of the biggest blocks to change is the people around us; friends/family/co-workers. That doesn't necessarily mean keep away from negative people, but socialising your incentives and desire to chnage can do a lot more than some dude talking in your earbuds over the sound of ocean waves.


     


    It's a lifetime of exploration ...





     


     


    Thats some insightful stuff oceanray! I agree with the whole dude in your earbuds comment. I bought in too much into the marketing and really thought self hypnosis could really make a difference but you hit another really good point that the majority of change is really self exploration. I am not dealing with a host of problems ie. trauma, depression, anxiety. Just the usual nagging issues that most of all humans face such as Procrastination, approaching new people and situations and the common self confidence stuff. I know there has to be some sort of brain hack or approach that one can use to reprogram these common so called flaws in our mind. I appreciate all approaches, meditation, hypnosis, metaphysics and so on I just think that no one has really nailed it yet. I think the closest thing to a good initial fix is EFT emotional tapping which can also be called acupressure it has helped a lot of people in many faccets of mind/behavior modification. I am not looking for an easy gimmick just trying to get to a proven approach to really change one's actions/habits without it taking years of modifying meditations.


  •  


     


    Like abrite says, Peter Levine has done amazing work, but he's talking about recovery from severe trauma, which is not your problem it seems. 



    It’s a big error the way US/therapeutic culture has overemphasised positive thinking/affirmations, to the exclusion of ‘realistic thinking’.


    Negative thoughts are crucial at times.Anxiety has advantages in some situations.


    There is a woman in my organisation who is clinically depressed, when I want a clear and accurate overview of what's going on, I go to her.


    =====


    Agreed, positive thinking/affirmations can only go so far-- and many end up doing something similar to 'spiritual bypassing'.  It's useful to be able to accurately assess something- which sometimes doesn't happen either with a depressed person (although some studies show they tend to have more realistic pov's); really the biggest issue is cognitive distortions in general-- anxiety is a useful tool sometimes, so is sadness, grief etc.  That's what I like about acceptance and commitment therapy is it isn't designed to "get rid of" these things, but to live with them with out additional distress from them.  Use your emotions as signals (although sometimes the signaling needs fine-tuning depending on what your underlying schemas/beliefs are), rather than being led around by them.  


    And totally agree re friends-- basically they give "change back" messages when they can't cope with changes because your change disrupts the homeostasis of their system, those that are more adaptive than others can generally cope pretty well; but often the change back messages come from their own sense of fear of something (maybe losing your friendship, maybe looking bad, maybe something else...)


    @Jason Hooper-- I've heard good things about both the Alexander method and the Feldenkries method, but I haven't looked into them with much depth.  I suspect there are many viable ways to rebalance your nervous system, and psychomotor connections, Kelly Starrett's book "Supple Leopard" comes to mind as well.    "Bodynamics" is another system that looks at the age of muscle development and theorizes about what did or didn't happen psychologically during certain developmental stages in childhood based on structure/function and movement patterns of right now and how to correct for them; as well as other exercises to quell anxiety in the now; again not more than a cursory look in to that.   I've been doing some ARP stuff with Justin Marchegiani in cupertino, it's interesting.  


    @thatsstevenbaker cool will check out that link!




    @demented_broomstick - the book "The Inner Game of Tennis" comes to mind- it is not something I've read, however many have told me it is great for learning how to use visualizations to improve their skill at sports.  


    I'm sure like many here we all have a reading list a mile long... 

     

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