Hypnosis-Behavior Modification-What Has Worked For You?

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Comments

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    Agreed, positive thinking/affirmations can only go so far-- and many end up doing something similar to 'spiritual bypassing'.  It's useful to be able to accurately assess something- which sometimes doesn't happen either with a depressed person (although some studies show they tend to have more realistic pov's); really the biggest issue is cognitive distortions in general-- anxiety is a useful tool sometimes, so is sadness, grief etc.  That's what I like about acceptance and commitment therapy is it isn't designed to "get rid of" these things, but to live with them with out additional distress from them.  Use your emotions as signals (although sometimes the signaling needs fine-tuning depending on what your underlying schemas/beliefs are), rather than being led around by them.  


    And totally agree re friends-- basically they give "change back" messages when they can't cope with changes because your change disrupts the homeostasis of their system, those that are more adaptive than others can generally cope pretty well; but often the change back messages come from their own sense of fear of something (maybe losing your friendship, maybe looking bad, maybe something else...)


    @Jason Hooper-- I've heard good things about both the Alexander method and the Feldenkries method, but I haven't looked into them with much depth.  I suspect there are many viable ways to rebalance your nervous system, and psychomotor connections, Kelly Starrett's book "Supple Leopard" comes to mind as well.    "Bodynamics" is another system that looks at the age of muscle development and theorizes about what did or didn't happen psychologically during certain developmental stages in childhood based on structure/function and movement patterns of right now and how to correct for them; as well as other exercises to quell anxiety in the now; again not more than a cursory look in to that.   I've been doing some ARP stuff with Justin Marchegiani in cupertino, it's interesting.  


    @thatsstevenbaker cool will check out that link!




    @demented_broomstick - the book "The Inner Game of Tennis" comes to mind- it is not something I've read, however many have told me it is great for learning how to use visualizations to improve their skill at sports.  


    I'm sure like many here we all have a reading list a mile long... 

     


     


    Thats awesome, I agree with acceptance therapy we have to learn to accept our faults and to some extent live with what we're dealing with. I like the sedona method for accepting what we are battling with it really has put me in a good place while dealing with terminal illnesses of both parents at somewhat of a young age. I highly recommend the book to anyone trying to look for answers to some intense moments in life.

  • Does anyone have a specific tactic they use against procrastination. I think this is one topic that I don't really see a lot of research literature on besides the typical do it now, afraid of failure, type responses. Anything have anything that has really worked for them?


  • RekaReka ✭✭✭


    Does anyone have a specific tactic they use against procrastination. I think this is one topic that I don't really see a lot of research literature on besides the typical do it now, afraid of failure, type responses. Anything have anything that has really worked for them?




     


    I used to be a world class procrastinator and really hated it. Now every morning when I get up I do a sort of journal, starting with gratitude then making a short to do list of the important items I want to get done that day. At the end of the day I list the things I've achieved. When it's a longer project of which I have to do parts I set up a small plan with reminders in my calendar, this helps me a lot because once I start it with a small part often I continue and do more work than I had planned, getting closer to finishing the job. So the trick is to get started.


    This helps me but we are all different so who knows if it will work for you. However the important change only comes over time so trying it for a week and then abandoning it won't do a thing, I noticed that getting uncomfortable stuff done became easier and I hope it will become second nature soon. I also tried the "eat the frog first" method when you try to get the most uncomfortable task out of the way first then continue with everything else. But I often have no control over the timing of these tasks.


    My real problem area is housekeeping though, my stuff is all over the place and I only put it in order before a family visit.

    It doesn't get easier... It's you who gets better.

     

    Is your social worker in that horse?

     

    Success has a price, not a secret.

  • If you are looking to remove patterns, a Speed Trace might help (e.g. http://easychangeworks.com/articles-nlp/doyletics.htm ) - have tried it, worked for me and two other people I know.


     


    In all cases, it was removing irrational aversions (to food, smell, sight) - but it could be useful for other things too.


  • Well, I think this shutting off of the critical faculty can be incredibly valuable in therapy.  I think it's one of the natural skills of a therapist -- to get people to drop their defenses and feel safe.  I think that is exactly why they require licensure, because therapists who don't know what they're doing can mess up people's minds.


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