Resistant Starch Caused Me To Crash

I have be more or less bullet proof for almost 2 years. I have had continuing gut sensitivity, but way better than before I changed my diet. I had the Genova test for parasites and it came back clean including SIBO. The only flags were inflamation and poor fat absorption, which is probably the consequence of a high fat diet.and not poor fat absorption. So reading all of the up sites to resistance starch I tried potato starch. I could only go for about 4 days before the gas induced lack of sleep forced me to stop. I would take few days off, just enough to recover and try it again, I only got up to 1tsp per day. I even took it in the morning so the gas would mitigate somewhat so I could get a little sleep. At the very end I even tried cold potatoes which were no better. After about a month my zeo was showing no deep sleep and very little rem with a wakeup every half hour or so and my Heart Math numbers crashed to the point I couldn't get out of the red. I took Jon's peppermint cure since sensitivity to starch is often a symptom of SIBO. It has been a month since my resistant starch episode and I am partly recovered.


The symptoms I had with the resistance starch were very much like the way I used to be all the time. Bloating, gas, constipation and bad sleep. I realized that legumes (beans but not peanuts) have always affected me this way. Am I genetically programmed to be sensitive to these foods. or is it just long term gut damage from years of bad diet. There is a history of gut problems my family


I took Garden of Life probiotics for about a year, which I have stopped.


Comments

  • Let me post some really great insights concerning RS.


    Safe starch, resistant starch. What's it going to be next, "Keto Starch"?

    How about we just eat a correct diet?


     



    Mark Sisson has just published The Definitive Guide to Resistant Starch in his blog, Mark's Daily Apple. You can read it here if you want: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-definitive-guide-to-resistant-starch/#axzz2xArdfz3H.


    I know a lot of people are talking about resistant starch these days, and according to Mark Sisson, Richard Nikoley, Tatertot Tim, and Dr. BG are even writing a book about it. But, man, I have to say, I just don't get it!


    By "resistant starch" is meant plant starch that "resists" digestion, starch that is not turned into glucose but that instead travels colonward unscathed, where it is supposed to feed beneficial gut bacteria (assuming beneficial gut bacteria are there to be fed) and create butyrate, a major fuel of local cells.


    This is all well and good--it's certainly good to feed our gut bacteria, and no one would argue that--but consider where resistant starch is found and what one has to do to get this stuff.


    One has got to either eat the likes of green, unripe bananas and plantains (sound tempting?), unsprouted mung beans, raw or cold potatoes (warm, cooked potatoes won't do the trick)--or else do what most aficionados seem to opt for, given that food sources of resistant starches aren't exactly toothsome--the stuff doesn't even have the usual carb appeal!--which is to take spoonfuls of potato starch supplementally. Moreover, if you read the comments, most everybody describes getting uncomfortable abdominal gas from these adventures, although they also describe this as curable by taking a probiotic supplement with the resistant starch supplement. (Dysbiotic gut microorganisms tend to be gas-producing, whereas beneficial gut microorganisms tend to be more acid forming.)


    Aside from the fact that there are plenty of other ways in which we can feed our gut bacteria with actual food--and have successfully done so for some 2.6 million years--where are the paleo/primal principles in the resistant starch fervor? It's a fundament of the primal approach to eat in the ways to which we are genetically adapted, according to which we evolved. You can bet this did not involve chowing down on the extracted starch of toxic solanaceae. As Charlie's comment attests: "Potatoes contain substantial amounts of two glycoalkaloids, namely solanine and chaconine that can wreck havoc on a person’s bowels. These chemicals disrupt gut epithelial barrier integrity and aggravate or maybe cause inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There are more concentrated in the skin of the potatoes. There are other possible toxic reactions to solanaceae that are under appreciated. There is a reported case in 2008 of diabetes insipidus brought on by high dose solanine." Who would invite this? Even resistant starch's reported benefit of increasing insulin receptor sensitivity and its corollary good things can be simply achieved in other ways, for example, by eating a diet high in fat, moderate in protein, and low in carbohydrate mostly from non-starchy fibrous vegetables.


    Supposedly potato starch causes one to have vivid dreams, possibly, as Mark Sisson posits, from its effects on butyrate/GABA or serotonin/melatonin. He writes that resistant starch confers the "ability to hold and direct (in real time) private viewings of vivid movie-esque dreams throughout the night." So I guess that's something, if this sort of thing is up your alley.


    Otherwise, the resistant starch approach just seems to me like an unnecessary, tortuous (and somewhat torturous!) attempt to arrive at a goal that's perfectly well attainable by eating a regular old paleo/primal diet, with some lovely good fats and tasty meats and vegetables, and sans the raw potatoes and green bananas. What do you think?


    - Dan
    ★彡On the path of optimal health...... B)
    ★"Keeping it real"★
    Love to learn, study and apply Nutrition, Health and Athleticism for a Superhuman Life.

  • Dan


    I after reading Marks blog and spending some time on Richards site (Richards site inspired me to do the experiment in the first place) I am wondering if like some people have celiac disease which is an extreme case of gluten sensitivity can I have a sensitivity to resistance starch or some common component contained in these foods. Looking a the list of things that contain RS,  I seem to react to all of them I have recently tried. I agree that if you can attain all the benefits without RS then I am on board. The problem is that my LDL remains high no mater what I do and based on Robb Wolf's comments it seemed like it might be a solution. I am not going to try it again soon, since I have not recovered from my recent experience.  I am just trying to understand what the problem is.


  • You are likely to be missing one of the minor species of gut microbes that helps to digest the Resistant Starch in tag team type fashion. Have a look at the info on the Animal Pharm blog.  You may need to take a probiotic like AOR's Probiotic-3 which Dr Art Ayers (coolinginflammation blog) recommends as it is one of the few that contains clostridium butyrium.  If you have the right gut flora the flatulence disappears altogether after about 3 weeks. Day 5 is usually the worst day. It seems like not all the species that work synergistically to digest the PS increase in number at the same rate which is why you get the gas. If one of the key species is missing altogether, you can only remedy it by taking probiotics or eating fermented foods. Dr BG (Animal Pharm) has a list of three suggested probiotics to help as well. Off the top of my head the only one I can remember is Prescript Assist.


  • Hackergirl


    So I looked at the Animal Pharm blog, there is a lot there. I am taking two of the three recomended probiotics, Primal Defense and Prescipt Assist. I did notice that they recommend potato starch psyllium husk, which I have been taking for a long time to maintain a minimum regularity. I take my probiotics in the AM and psyllium in the evening, I think I will take them together. I am also considering increasing my psyllium  and taking the probiotics more than once a day. I have been hesitant since a lot of people recomend not overdoing probiotics. Other than that my other take is  I need to try to increase my intake of fermented food.


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats
    edited April 2014

    I'm pretty sure psyllium husk is a non-fermentable (insoluble) fiber, so even gut bacteria can't digest it.


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