Rip Seth Roberts

edited April 2014 in Biohacker Banter

Not seeing anything related here, and being quite interested in this case, sadly it has been reported that fellow self-hacker Seth Roberts passed away while hiking on April 26th.


 


Very curious to find out any and all details when they are reported.


 


RIP Seth.  We have lost a fellow free-thinker.


 


http://blog.sethroberts.net/


Seeing through the chaotic.

Comments

  • Yeah, I saw this too. Sad stuff...


     


    I loved his interview with John Durant during PaleoCon. He will be missed.


  • StevoStevo Upgrade in Progress

    Very sad. I would be interested to find out more. Its a bit of a wake up call if he died due to some kind of experiment he was doing.


  • Seth's blog was one of my favorites. I wish there were more professors blogging out there. 


     


    I do really wonder about his intake of omega-3s. I'm very skeptical of the omega 3 fad and I wonder if it could have killed him. I'd really like to know more. He was taking almost 5 grams of omega 3 a day. 


  • Since people can respond differently to supplements, you may not want to rule anything out for now.


     


    Having said that, I know a doctor I've done marketing work for that takes 8 to 12 grams of omega 3 a day. But he constantly tracks his omega 3 to 6 ratio, overall index, and all kinds of other things. It's certainly possible to take that much and it be a beneficial thing to do.

  • edited May 2014

    Following up with respect here. In roughly six months we should learn more.


     


    "Cause of Death


     


    May 10, 2014


     


    Hello, this is Seth’s mother Justine. I’d like to offer what little information I have to try to answer some of the questions that were posted about Seth’s death. We’re told that we’ll get a full coroner’s report in about 6 months. In the meantime we were given only “Cause A: Occlusive coronary artery disease” and “Other significant conditions: cardiomegaly.”


     


    Most of you won’t be surprised to learn that Seth had not visited his doctor in Berkeley in many years, and, responding to a recent question, said that he hadn’t been to a doctor during his stay in Beijing either. We are left with 3 sets of paper records. The earliest, dated 2009, reports a Coronary Calcium (Agatston score) screening which he discussed here last October. He obtained a second screening 1-1/2 year later. The first report showed his coronary artery occlusion to be about average for a man his age, with an accompanying risk of heart attack, but no cardiomegaly. The second report, following his conclusion that butter was beneficial for him, and his heavy ingestion of it, showed an improvement in his score: “Most people get about 25% worse each year. My second scan showed regression (= improvement). It was 40% better (less) than expected (a 25% increase).” The report showed the calcification to be unevenly distributed, with most found in his left main coronary artery, and none in all but one of the other arteries. Again, no heart enlargement was reported.


     


    The second medical report set, done in December 2011, was from Beijing and covered an exam that may have been required by his employer, Tsinghua University. This included a physical exam, an x-ray and EKG. All reports were negative, i.e., no abnormal findings and no cardiomegaly.


    The third set of reports, from a laboratory in St. Charles, Ill., used data collected in Berkeley. They list toxic and essential elements in his hair. The latest report, dated July 18, 2013, showed one element rated “high.” This was mercury, “found to correlate with a 9% increase in AMI [acute myocardial infarction]” according to the report. His level was assumed to indicate exposure gained from eating fish. Presumably Beijing’s toxic smog contributed directly both to the mercury level of the fish that he ate there, and to the level in his hair.


     


    The only information about his blood pressure was in the Beijing report where it was recorded at 117/87. I could find no information about cholesterol levels, though it has not been a familial problem. Of the remaining Framingham Study risk factors: Seth did not smoke or have diabetes. He was not overweight and was physically active. Seth’s father died of a heart attack at 72.


     


    Of course, I can’t end this posting without sending my deepest thanks for all of the kind notes posted here. They were hurtful to read because of the reminding. They were healing to read because of the solace gained from learning about his friends and that he was able to help many people.


     


    -Justine


    Seeing through the chaotic.
  • SkeletorSkeletor The Conqueror Worm ✭✭✭

    I don't really know anything about this guy. I'd never heard of him until news of his death began to spread. From what little I've been able to gather, he ate a paleo(?) diet, megadosed on fish oil and other stuff, and then suddenly dropped dead at a young age-- with occlusive CAD and an enlarged heart, no less?? I mean, does that about sum it up? Crazy.


    "I know how to despise mere cool intelligence. What I want is intelligence matched by pure, physical existence, like a statue." --Yukio Mishima

     

    Let's be friends on MyFitnessPal!

  • kaikai


    Following up with respect here. In roughly six months we should learn more.




    *********************************************************


     


    Why does it take six months to obtain a full coroner's report?

  • kaikai


    May 10, 2014


     


    Hello, this is Seth’s mother Justine. I’d like to offer what little information I have to try to answer some of the questions that were posted about Seth’s death. We’re told that we’ll get a full coroner’s report in about 6 months. In the meantime we were given only “Cause A: Occlusive coronary artery disease” and “Other significant conditions: cardiomegaly.”


     


    Most of you won’t be surprised to learn that Seth had not visited his doctor in Berkeley in many years, and, responding to a recent question, said that he hadn’t been to a doctor during his stay in Beijing either. We are left with 3 sets of paper records. The earliest, dated 2009, reports a Coronary Calcium (Agatston score) screening which he discussed here last October. He obtained a second screening 1-1/2 year later. The first report showed his coronary artery occlusion to be about average for a man his age, with an accompanying risk of heart attack, but no cardiomegaly. The second report, following his conclusion that butter was beneficial for him, and his heavy ingestion of it, showed an improvement in his score: “Most people get about 25% worse each year. My second scan showed regression (= improvement). It was 40% better (less) than expected (a 25% increase).” The report showed the calcification to be unevenly distributed, with most found in his left main coronary artery, and none in all but one of the other arteries. Again, no heart enlargement was reported.


     


    The second medical report set, done in December 2011, was from Beijing and covered an exam that may have been required by his employer, Tsinghua University. This included a physical exam, an x-ray and EKG. All reports were negative, i.e., no abnormal findings and no cardiomegaly.


    The third set of reports, from a laboratory in St. Charles, Ill., used data collected in Berkeley. They list toxic and essential elements in his hair. The latest report, dated July 18, 2013, showed one element rated “high.” This was mercury, “found to correlate with a 9% increase in AMI [acute myocardial infarction]” according to the report. His level was assumed to indicate exposure gained from eating fish. Presumably Beijing’s toxic smog contributed directly both to the mercury level of the fish that he ate there, and to the level in his hair.


     


    The only information about his blood pressure was in the Beijing report where it was recorded at 117/87. I could find no information about cholesterol levels, though it has not been a familial problem. Of the remaining Framingham Study risk factors: Seth did not smoke or have diabetes. He was not overweight and was physically active. Seth’s father died of a heart attack at 72.


     


    Of course, I can’t end this posting without sending my deepest thanks for all of the kind notes posted here. They were hurtful to read because of the reminding. They were healing to read because of the solace gained from learning about his friends and that he was able to help many people.


     


    -Justine




    ***************************************************************************


     


    One thing jumps out here: Seth may not have been going to a doctor, but wouldn't he have collected and tracked lots of data using tools like WellnessFx?

  • Thanks for posting the update, sportsbettingman. I'll be interested to know the results. I wasn't a close follower of Seth's work, but looked at his blog a little and heard a great interview with him on a Paleo conference a couple months ago. I really got a feel for his personality and style as quirky and likeable from that interview.


  • kaikai

    Here is a comment posted by one of Seth's blog by one of his friends (Dave):


     


    "Justine – I am a friend of Seth’s here in Berkeley. I have already been in touch with Amy, and want to communicate my condolences to you also. His passing came as quite a shock to me. I can’t imagine how it might have been for you.


     


    Since you have brought up the issue of the hair test (actually, there were multiple), and since I am the one who was involved with Seth on this issue, perhaps it is now appropriate for me to say something about it. Seth had a mouthful of amalgam fillings. Worse, he also had gold in his mouth; and when differing metals are in combination like this in the same mouth, the less noble one will just dissolve into the saliva. Dental text-books are quite clear that these combinations should be avoided, but dentists routinely ignore it. While I had talked to Seth for a long time about the issue, it was only when I got him access to a Jerome mercury vapor meter that he took it seriously. The level of mercury vapor in his oral cavity was astronomical. If I remember correctly, it was measured at nearly 60mcg/m^3, some 200x EPA limits for long-term exposure. (That’s off the top of my head. If relevant, I can check those numbers.) As a result, he had his amalgam fillings removed.


     


    Subsequently, Seth began to do hair tests, which were uniformly and over a period of years, high in mercury. I tried to tell him that the problem was not gone. That the half-life of mercury in the brain is some 25 years, and so he needed to consider the question of detoxification. Particularly as some of his symptoms, including the insomnia, were certainly consistent with mercury toxicity. And, his need for so many omega-3 oils seemed to indicate a high rate of oxidation of these oils in the body. He listened, but never really did anything about it. Since the main targets of mercury toxicity are the electrical tissues (brain & heart) and the detoxification organs (liver, kidney & skin), I can’t help but think that this must have been a factor in his untimely death. I am sorry to have lost a good friend. I encourage others to consider this aspect of health quite seriously. To explore it further, you can contact DAMS at amalgam.org. They keep a list of amalgam-free dentists and sympathetic MD’s. (Though beware of their detoxification advice.) You might also join the [email protected] and [email protected] lists, and have a look at the books “Amalgam Illness: Diagnosis and Treatment” and “Hair Test Interpretation: Finding Hidden Toxicites” by Andrew Cutler (noamalgam.com). These latter resources provide a slow, low dose, physiologically appropriate detoxification protocol. (It’s not just the detests who are failing to read their textbooks. When it comes to chelation, the MD’s don’t do follow their own advice on the proper dosing of pharmaceuticals.)"


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