Nutritional Benefits Of Herbs In The Bp Diet.

NickatNickat
edited June 2014 in The Bulletproof Diet

Okay so this is obvious but thought it useful to put down here. There has been much talk of raw milk, kefir and the lack calcium in our diet on the forum lately and that got us thinking.


No doubt fresh vegetables and meats can give us nutritional benefits but what about dried and fresh herbs used to flavour them?


 


Surprisingly some can add nutritional values by quite alot. Just a tablespoon of ground thyme, for example, gives about 80mg of calcium. Ground oregano at 86mg or there abouts, slightly more. Not bad values at all.


 


The drying process with longer periods of storage time will eventually deplete these nutritional values but they still have nutritional worth. So what of fresh herbs?


 


Just an ounce of fresh Basil gives 88mg of omega 3 fatty acids and contains Vitamins A, K and C.


Dried Basil has 33mg of the same omega 3 fatty acid with lesser amounts of the same vitamins.


Both pretty good if used daily. Unfortunately the longer the fresh herb is refrigerated, the further the values deplete.


Makes us want to start a herb garden. These are just a few examples of how we can further add nutrients in our diet.


 


Post your favorite herbs, be it fresh or dried with a short note regarding it`s benefits.


e.g. anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and that type of thing.


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Comments

  • Jason HooperJason Hooper ✭✭✭
    edited June 2014

    My two favorite herbs are ginger and cilantro.


     


    Ginger is a member of the rhizome family (like turmeric, bamboo, carnivora).  It is very easy to grow.  You can just buy some from the store, put it in the ground, and wait a year.  It has a nice, zesty flavor and goes well in stir-fry, teas, and beer.  It is a powerful anti-microbial and anti-oxidant.


     


    Cilantro (coriander) is an annual herb in the apiaceae family (parsley, celery, carrots).  It is also easy to grow and self-seeds.  Many people grow this plant indoors because it does not require a lot of sunlight, but do not harvest too much, or you will kill it.  Cilantro, avocado, and lime juice are the staples in a good guacamole!  It also goes great in a stir-fry.  It is an excellent, natural detoxifier.  It is also anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, great for the gut, good for the eyes, immune system, and helps regulate blood sugar.  Cilantro is probably the best herb out there and should be in everyone's garden.


  • @ Jason... how much cilantro do you have to use for "detox" effects?


     


    I love rosemary, thyme, tarragon, dill, turmeric, and ginger in my eggs.....


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats
    I would never eat that much of any of those herbs in a meal though. But yeah, they do add some nutrition aswell as flavor.
  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    Fresh parsley and cilentro salad with lemon and spring onions is a great base for lightly tossed seafood on top as an intro. Wow it's awesome and think of the nutritional benefits.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    @Megs1768



     


    Herbs can be used in additional to supplements. Especially when detoxing. Fresh turmeric root is awesome.


     


    The greater the sources and more natural, the better. It enhances the effect.


    Trying to eat the equivalent in terms of grams or mg in herbs (fresh) would need the appetite of a horse. You might like looking here for combined pill variants of herbs: http://www.ariseandshine.com/whole-body-detox/herbal-nutrition-all-organic-or-wild-crafted-300-capsules.html#prettyPhoto


    The point here is that these herbs are often overlooked as flavorsome items used in cooking.


    That need not be the case at all.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    Just 10g of fresh Basil leaves contain 528mg of vitamin A. Buy organic or grow your own.It`s an alternative to cod liver oil pills. Just remember adding too much vitamin A in your diet can result in liver damage.If your catching colds often you might want to try and add more vitamin A.Try combining 1/4 cup crushed basil leaves, a tablespoon of lemon juice, a half cup of grass fed salted butter and roll into balls. (You can add garlic if you like). Leave in fridge for 30 mins to set.


    Tastes great if left to melt on a steaks.


  • @megs1768


     


    It will not take very much cilantro for the dextox effect.  A teaspoon of cilantro contains enough phenolic compounds to safely remove quite a bit of toxic material from the body for elimination.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014
    Different parts of  herbs may contain higher levels of nutrients and properties. An example would be that the leaf of cilantro plant has more than the stem when we are talking about phenolic content. There is no reason why both can`t be used though.

    If your looking for higher amounts of phenolic and antioxidants per fresh herb at equal weighted amounts you might want to look at Mint and Parsley. Again leaf part higher than the stem in these free radical fighting properties.

     


  • CycloneCyclone rich in satisfats
    Cilantro is also supposed to have some kind of anti-anxiety effects also.
  • brainstorm11brainstorm11 ✭✭ ✭✭

    I've heard (not verified) that herbs actually have a higher nutrient content than other leafy greens. Their strong flavor supposedly indicates nutrient value that has been bred out of things like spinach. Interesting thought


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    @brainstorm11


    You know that wouldn't surprise us at all. Grown fresh for a supermarket and growing fresh from a wild source are two entirely different concepts.


     


    Think about the hybrid techniques and growing technology used to mass produce store bought so called fresh herbs and spices. Now compare that to the wild varieties that exist on the planet. Pretty sure if we examine this further with data we could find reasons and examples why this is the case? The nuclius of a seed pod is very likely to contain more than the leaf but might not always be the case.

    It's the placenta of life for the plant to grow. Could be worth researching the properties of stem, leaf, seed and fruit not to mention dried or fresh. Flavor and smell need not be as important as we are lead to believe.


    Don't even get us started on the storage of herbs and spices. The mycotoxins caused by bad storage etc...has been covered in another thread. Dave "The Canary" has plenty to say about that there.


    There`s a great article about the assessment of microbiological safety of dried spices and herbs here too:


    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11130-010-0186-0#page-1


     


    Lastly, further natural causes of why some plants produce toxins biologically to repel or counter diseases etc...


    These do change the nutrients of the plants themselves and should be looked at too.


  • NickatNickat
    edited June 2014

    Okay so after getting my results back (Nick) saw that the total White Blood Cell count still low. Was`nt surprized as it is genetically low just like my father's. The Neutrophil count was 1.20 10*9/L just below the lower end of the "in range" amount. Decided to test out the Astragalus plant root to see if this improves the count in the future.


     


    http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/astragalus


     


    It`s a Chinese herb known as huang qi, meaning "yellow leader", because the root is yellow (a little like tumeric).


    Was hoping the amounts of Vitamin supplements A, C and Zinc might have influenced the balance and the clean BP Diet too but the levels hardly moved up much. Maybe this plant root will improve immune function too.


    Anyone used it?


     


    Side Effects and Safety Concerns


     


    People with autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes or systemic lupus erythematosus shouldn't use astragalus unless recommended by a qualified healthcare practitioner. People who have had transplant surgery should not use astragalus.


    The safety of astragalus in pregnant or nursing women or children isn't known.


     


    Possible Interactions


     


    Astragalus may interfere with the effectiveness of corticosteroid medications, such as:


    • Nasacort (triamcinolone)
    • Beconase, Vancenase (beclomethasone)
    • Decadron (dexamethasone)
    • Deltasone (prednisone)
    • hydrocortisone
    • Medrol (methylprednisolone)
    • prednisolone

     


    Astragalus may decrease the effectiveness of drugs that suppress the immune system, such as Imuran (azathioprine), CellCept, cyclosporine, Prograf, Rapamune and Zenapak.


    Theoretically, astragalus can increase the effectiveness of antiviral medications such as acyclovir and amantadine.


  • Interesting.  Astragalus herbs have also been shown to increase telemeter length.  In fact, the ultra expensive supplement, TA-65 is a propriatary blend of astragalus.


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822369


  • John BrissonJohn Brisson The Legend Formerly Known as Ron Swanson ✭✭✭
    edited June 2014


    Okay so after getting my results back (Nick) saw that the total White Blood Cell count still low. Was`nt surprized as it is genetically low just like my father's. The Neutrophil count was 1.20 10*9/L just below the lower end of the "in range" amount. Decided to test out the Astragalus plant root to see if this improves the count in the future.


     


    http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/astragalus


     


    It`s a Chinese herb known as huang qi, meaning "yellow leader", because the root is yellow (a little like tumeric).


    Was hoping the amounts of Vitamin supplements A, C and Zinc might have influenced the balance and the clean BP Diet too but the levels hardly moved up much. Maybe this plant root will improve immune function too.


    Anyone used it?


     


    Side Effects and Safety Concerns


     


    People with autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes or systemic lupus erythematosus shouldn't use astragalus unless recommended by a qualified healthcare practitioner. People who have had transplant surgery should not use astragalus.


    The safety of astragalus in pregnant or nursing women or children isn't known.


     


    Possible Interactions


     


    Astragalus may interfere with the effectiveness of corticosteroid medications, such as:


    • Nasacort (triamcinolone)
    • Beconase, Vancenase (beclomethasone)
    • Decadron (dexamethasone)
    • Deltasone (prednisone)
    • hydrocortisone
    • Medrol (methylprednisolone)
    • prednisolone

     


    Astragalus may decrease the effectiveness of drugs that suppress the immune system, such as Imuran (azathioprine), CellCept, cyclosporine, Prograf, Rapamune and Zenapak.


    Theoretically, astragalus can increase the effectiveness of antiviral medications such as acyclovir and amantadine.




     


    Astragalus helps with liver function.


    My book Fix Your Gut, is offered on Amazon for $9.99.

     

    I also offer coaching:  http://fixyourgut.com/health-coaching-information/

     

    Please join or like the Fix your Gut Facebook. Also please add me on twitter @FixYourGutJB.

     

    http://www.fixyourgut.com

     

  • NickatNickat
    edited July 2014


    Interesting.  Astragalus herbs have also been shown to increase telemeter length.  In fact, the ultra expensive supplement, TA-65 is a propriatary blend of astragalus.


     


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20822369




     


    There is a thread started by Mikeymilios (http://forum.bulletproofexec.com/index.php?/topic/9249-nitric-oxide-lobsters-telomeres-and-aging/) of which we contributed. The TA-65 you mention had escaped us in the fact that it does have astragulus (or at least the extracted pure sourced Cycloastragenol from their roots).


    Now of course this extracted isolated molecule will have telomerase activation activity far greater than the ground root itself but will this help replenish white blood cells in any way?


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