Coconut Oil Cognitive Enhancement

edited March 2012 in Brain Hacking
I began a coconut oil experiment last week. I'm taking at least 2 tablespoons per day (Usually more). I wanted a control test to see if my cognitive abilities increased and decided on Sudoku since I have an electronic version, which I have a year history with. I chose easy (vanilla) level, to be able to do more games for more test points. I'm on test point 14 right now, and do realized that it may still not be statistically significant. However, I reduced my best score from 5:34 seconds to 4:16 seconds and have reduced my average time from 7:58 seconds to 6:03 seconds (a 24% improvement in both areas). My IQ as a child was around 121, but has decreased (probably due to improved, less biased testing) to around 117. I'm considering trying to run some IQ tests as well, to log any improvements. Has anyone else had the same type of success with coconut oil, and do you have other ways I can measure to see if this is real or a placebo effect?

Comments

  • You can't really measure the placebo effect on yourself. I'm sure you can come up with half a dozen reasons why that would be problematic.



    What you CAN do is perform another "enhancement" activity, such as adding butter instead of coconut oil to your diet, or doing meditation instead of any nutritional modifications. Basically you want to try to induce the same hopeful optimism that something you're doing is going to work that you got from the coconut oil, in effect "standardizing the placebo effect" to attempt to nullify it as the variable in performance.



    Chances are, you will see differences in your performance between all of the potential "enhancement" practices. The question is whether the differences are statistically significant, for which you will need to be able to calculate your own margins of error, which is also a highly bias-laden prospect.



    The above is why I distrust anyone's claims of quantifiable boosts in mental performance from any given activity -- least of all my own. image/smile.png' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />
  • +1



    Subjectively, I do not feel cognitive improvement from eating coconut oil (or any other OTC nootropic, for that matter).
  • Hey Frank, are there any non OTC nootropics that you have had good experiences with?



    Have you measured any objective improvements?
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